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EX LIBRIS 

STEPHEN 

ZOLTAN 

STARR 




HISTORY 



of the 



Tenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry 

Three Months and Three Years Organizations 



By JAMES BIRNEY SHAW 

Secretary of Regimental Association 



LAFAYETTE, INDIANA 
1912 



Committee on Publication of History 



The following were designated by the regiment Committee of ten, one from each company 

to arrange for the publication of the History: Company A— Rodert E. Burns 

T. B. SHAW, Historian." B— Martin V. Wert 

C — David Brant 
D — Elisha Little 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE E-John w _ Calhoun 

Martin V. AVERT F — John H. Stephens 

David Brant G — Alfred Smith 

Thomas M. Small H — Ferguson D. Carson 

Milton C. Hockman, Chairman I — Thomas M. Small 

James A. Price, Secretary K — Milton C. Hockman 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyoftenthreOOinshaw 



DEDICATION 

'T^O the Officers and Members of the Tenth 
Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
living and dead, whose patriotism was un- 
excelled and whose bravery on the field of 
battle was unequaled, this volume is affec- 
tionately dedicated by the 

Author. 



V 



PREFACE 



HEREWITH I present to you a history of our regiment. 
No pains or expense has been spared in its prepara- 
tion. Xo claim is made as to its being absolutely per- 
fect and there is no doubt there will be many omissions, espe- 
cially as to incidents, anecdotes, etc., which is alone chargeable 
to the failure of the members of the regiment in responding to 
the circular sent to you in 1909. This circular requested you 
to state if you were wounded, when and where, if you re- 
enlisted after discharge or final muster out of the regiment, 
your personal experiences, or any particular incident of interest 
that may have come under your observation. Out of 450 cir- 
culars mailed replies were received from 15, therefore I was 
obliged to confine myself to the actual record of events. 

The muster rolls of the regiment are absolutely correct as 
to enlistment and discharge. The post-office addresses of three 
months men are woefully lacking, for the reason nearly all of 
the three months men re-enlisted in other commands and are 
scattered to the "four winds of the earth" and could not be 
found. 

Of the three years organization all of the 1165 men are 
accounted for excepting thirty-three, whose whereabouts or 
their fate is unknown. 

The record of wounded is as near perfect as is possible to 
make it. Diligent search has been made for the list of wounded 
at Chickamauga, but it seems it was never published. 

The matters pertaining to the disgraceful battle of Perry- 
ville including official reports is included but principally the 
relieving of Major General George H. Thomas from command 



of our Corps, and placing in command that non-entity, the "un- 
speakable" Gilbert. 

The matters relating to the Tullahoma and Chickamauga 
campaigns have been inserted with official correspondence, for 
the reason our regiment and division took a conspicuous part 
in these campaigns and to correct many unjust criticisms of the 
manner in which these campaigns were conducted by Major 
General W. S. Rosecrans. 

T am indebted to Robert R. Vest of Company I, for use 
of his diary, also to Mrs. R. G. McQueen for the loan of her 
husband's (R. G. McQueen, Co. D) diary. 

I am also especially indebted to Corporal W. H. Wiley 
(now deceased) for his thrilling account of the battle of 
Chickamauga, he being present through it all. while I was 
ordered by General Thomas to the 14th Corps Hospital for 
duty, leaving the field at 9 o'clock on the morning of the 19th, 
my thanks are due to Comrades Cyrus Clark, James A. Price, 
Co. C, Capt. M. V. West, Co. B., M. C. Hackman, Co K, for 
the interested manifested and assistance rendered. 

With these explanations, I remain, 
Your Comrade, 




Secretary 10th Indiana Infantry. 




This badge was designed 
by Miss Eulora Miller of 
LaFayette, Indiana, and at 
the reunion of the regiment 
at Lebanon, Indiana, Sep- 
tember 19, 1885, was adopted 
as the regimental badge. 



INTRODUCTION 



IT is not necessary, perhaps, to refer to the causes which led 
up to the late Rebellion, so far as the members of the 
regiment is concerned, but for the information of coming 
generations who may read this history. 

The United States of America has been cursed with four 
traitors during the period of its existence. Benedict Arnold 
who in command at West Point, New York, in Revolutionary 
times, betrayed his country for fifty thousand dollars, a com- 
mission as Brigadier General in the British Army, gave all the 
plans of fortifications, the number of men, etc., to the British 
General. Sir Henry Clinton, at New York. The British com- 
mander sent his aide-de-camp. Major Andre, up the river in a 
sloop of war to have an interview with Arnold, and to perfect 
the arrangements for the surrender of West Point. Andre 
landed September 21st, 1780; met Arnold and the latter agreed 
to surrender West Point, on condition that he received from 
the British Government $50,000 and a commission of Brigadier 
General in the British Arm}'. Andre was arrested as a spy, 
tried, convicted and hanged. 

Washington offered to release Andre, if the British Gov- 
ernment would surrender Arnold ; they refused, and Andre 
paid the penalty with his life. Arnold subsequently died in 
London a pauper with not a soul to sympathize with him or 
mourn his death. 

Aaron Burr was the next traitor to his country. In 1804 
after he killed Alexander Hamilton, Burr tried to be elected 
Governor of New York. Failing in this he migrated west and 



there set on foot a scheme for attacking Mexico, and involving 
this country in a war with foreign nations, and establish an 
empire there for the benefit of himself and his co-conspirators. 
Burr was an unprincipled villain and cared not what means was 
necessary to carry out his nefarious schemes. He had planned 
to seize New Orleans, taking forcible possession of the bank, 
and military and naval stores. He intended to induce all people 
west of the Alleghanies to join with him in founding the em- 
pire and proclaim himself emperor. 

The Government finally became cognizant of his plot, 
caused his arrest for treason at Richmond, Va., August 17, 
1807. He was tried but the government failed to find any overt 
act, and he escaped. Finding his influence gone he left the 
country and died a pauper. 

The third person who was to a certain extent a traitor to 
his country, was John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina. In 1832 
he favored secession and was about to put his doctrine in effect, 
when Andrew Jackson, then President, notified him that unless 
he ceased at once his treasonable designs he would "hang him 
higher than Hainan." 

The fourth traitor to his country was Jeff Davis, of Mis- 
sissippi. The treasonable doctrines enunciated by Calhoun was 
spread broadcast over the south, and the doctrine of state 
rights had become a fixed principle in the minds of the south- 
erners. 

The agitation against African Slavery had been going on 
from the election of Washington as President up to 1863. He 



10 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



was in favor of the freedom of the slave. So was Thomas 
Jefferson. 

Jefferson said, "I tremble for the fate of my country if the 
system of slavery is to be perpetuated in the states or extended 
to the territories." This statement in after years proved a 
prophecy. The abolition sentiment gained ground rapidly in the 
North and in 1840 the abolitionists put a National ticket in 
the field with James G. Birney, of Kentucky, as their candidate 
for President. 

The South in the meantime became arrogant. The slave 
holders demanding the right to extend slavery to the territories 
of Kansas and Nebraska. Border ruffians from Missouri, Ark- 
ansas and Texas swarmed over the territory of Kansas for the 
purpose of intimidating the inhabitants thereof from voting 
Kansas a free state. In the Halls of Congress the debates were 
marked with much bitterness. 

The fight against slavery properly began in 1840 and con- 
tinued until 1863. From 1856 to i860, especially in the terri- 
tory of Kansas was the war waged. It was the "dark and 
bloody ground." The border ruffian element from Missouri 



and other border slave states had invaded Kansas, who sought 
to force slavery upon the people of the territory against their 
will and have the territory admitted to the Union as a slave 
state. Murder, rapine and vandalism ran riot. Freemen were 
shot down in their own dooryards with as little feeling as if 
they had been wild beasts. 

John Brown, of Osawatomie, started the ball rolling 
when he invaded Virginia, captured the arsenal at Harper's 
Ferry and attempted to arm the slaves to fight for freedom. 
It was foolhardiness on the part of Brown — simply the work of 
a fanatic which subsequently cost him his life — he being hanged 
December, 1859. The raid however, had its effect on the peo- 
ple of the North, especially in Massachusetts the hotbed of Ab- 
olitionism. In i860 the presidential campaign opened with four 
parties in the field, Republican, Douglass Democrats, Breck- 
inridge (or Southern) Democrats, and the American (Know- 
nothing). The result was the election of Abraham Lincoln, of 
Illinois, for President, and Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, for 
Vice-President. It was very evident that the South would nev- 
er recognize President Lincoln, and at the close of i860 every- 
thing looked dark and ominious. 



CHAPTER I 

1861 



THE year opened with preparations for Secession of the 
States and Civil War. Buchanan, president, was weak- 
kneed, and in full sympathy with the would-be traitors 
and practically shut his eyes to the villainous practices of mem- 
bers of his cabinet. Floyd, as Secretary of War, robbed the 
Government of all its arms and munitions of war, Cobb looted 
the treasury and Toombs the navy. So when Abraham Lin- 
coln was inaugurated, he found an empty treasury and all prop- 
erty of the Government stolen and a section of the country pre- 
paring for war. State after state seceded from the Union, and 
under the leadership of the traitor, Jeff Davis, had attempted 
to organize a government of their own. April 12th, 1861, the 
opening gun of the war was fired on Fort Sumpter in Charles- 
ton Harbor. The fort was defended by Major Anderson and a 
few men who fought until fire compelled them to surrender. 
This action on the part of the rebels fired the heart of the en- 
tire North, and they were getting ready for the conflict. From 
Adjutant General Terrill's Reports we find the following: "The 
telegraph on the morning of the 15th of April, 1861, bore the 
following message from Governor Morton to President Lincoln 
at Washington :" 



"Executive Department of Indiana, 

Indianapolis, April 15, 1861. 
To Abraham Lincoln, 

President of the United States. 
On behalf of the State of Indiana, I tender to you for the 
defense of the Nation and to uphold the authority of the Gov- 
ernment ten thousand men. 

(Signed) Oliver P. Morton, 

Governor of Indiana." 

On the same day President Lincoln issued his proclama- 
tion calling for 75,000 men to suppress the rebellion. The 
quota of Indiana was subsequently fixed by the Secretary of 
War at six regiments of infantry. Governor Morton issued his 
proclamation on the 16th, calling upon the loyal men of Indiana 
to rally around "old glory" in defense of the Union, and by the 
26th day of April the Tenth Regiment was ready for the field. 
The regiment was organized and mustered into the United 
States service on the 25th day of April, 1861, with Joseph J. 
Reynolds as colonel. 

This officer being commissioned a Brigadier General of 
Volunteers on the 10th of May following, Major Mahlon D. 
Manson was promoted colonel. On the 19th of June the Tenth, 
accompanied by the Eighth, left Indianapolis for Parkersburg, 



12 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



West Virginia, by way of Cincinnati and Marietta, Ohio. From 
Parkersbnrg the Tenth marched to Clarksburg and from thence 
to Buckhannon. After a few days rest, it took np its line of 
march as part of General Rosecrans' command at Rich Moun- 
tain, camping at its base on the night of July 10. Early next 
morning the regiment marched by a bridle path a distance of 
nine miles, guided by a young Union man named David Hart, 
when they were brought to a halt by the enemy's pickets who 
fired and ran. It was here that Captain Chris Miller, Company 
A, received a dangerous wound which subsequently caused his 
death. 

The Tenth then took position behind a hill until ordered 
to charge the enemy's works, which was done in gallant style, 
resulting in the rout of the enemy and the loss of their guns. 
Rebel General Garnett, commanding, was killed. After this the 
enemy were driven from their position on the mountain by the 
combined Union forces. Lieutenant A. O. Miller, Co. C, was 
selected by General Rosecrans to take possession of all the 
arms, etc., captured, which consisted of several cannon, large 
amount of ammunition, wagons, camp and garrison equipage. 
Lieut. Miller then hauled down the Rebel flag and raised the 
Stars and Stripes in its stead. 

After the battle the Tenth camped on the ground and the 
next day (July 12) marched for Beverly, where it remained 
until July 24, when it was ordered to Indiana and mustered out 
August 4, 1861. The battle of Rich Mountain was the first 
victory of the war. The loss in the Tenth was 3 killed and 15 
wounded. 



Report of Brigadier General W. S. Rosecrans, U. S. A., of 
the Engagement at Rich Montain, Va. 



Headquarters First Brigade U. S. Volunteers. 
Beverly, Va., July 19. 1861. 
Major : 

In obedience to the order of the Major General command- 
ing, I have the honor to submit the following report of the op- 
erations of the First Brigade, consisting of the Eighth, Tenth 
Volunteer Militia, Thirteenth Indiana U. S. Volunteer Infantry 
and the Nineteenth Ohio Reg. Volunteer Militia, which resulted 
in dislodging the Rebel forces from their intrenched position at 
Camp Garnett on Rich Mountain. 

After the armed reconnaissance was over, by direction of 
the Major General, I ordered the Eighth Indiana to bivouac in 
advance of the camp at Roaring Creek, and the Tenth ami 
Thirteenth into camp. About 10 P. M. I came to headquarters 
with a plan for turning the enemy's position. The general hav- 
ing considered it. and heard information on which it was based, 
was pleased to direct me to carry it out, and for that purpose 
ordered Colonel Sullivan of the Thirteenth Indiana and Burd- 
sal's Cavalry, temporarily attached to the brigade, and that the 
movement should begin at daylight of the next morning. The 
troops were ordered to parade in silence, under arms without 
knapsacks, with one day's rations in their haversacks, and their 
canteens filled with water. By inadvertence the assembly was 
sounded in the Nineteenth Ohio regiment and lights put in sev- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



13 



eral tents, when I discovered it, they were promptly extin- 
guished. The pickets relieved, the regimental camps and guards, 
with the sick and a few men of each company remaining, or- 
ders were given that the reveille should be beaten at the usual 
hour, and the column formed and moved forward in the fol- 
lowing order : 



Eighth Indiana under Benton 
Tenth Indiana under Manson 
Thirteenth Indiana under Sullivan 
Nineteenth Ohio under Beatty 

Total Infantry 
Burdsal's Cavalry 



Aggregate 



242 strong 

425 " 
650 " 



1842 

75 

1917 



Colonel Lauder, accompanied by the guide led the way 
through the pathless forest, over rocks and ravines, keeping 
far down on the southeastern declivities of the mountain spur, 
and using no ax, to avoid discovery by the enemy, whom we 
supposed would be on the alert, by reason of the appearance 
of unusual stir in our camp, and the lateness of the hour. 
A rain set in about 6 A. M. and lasted until about 11 o'clock 
A. M., with intermissions, during which the column pushed 
cautiously and steadily forward, and arrived at last in the rear 
of the crest on top of Rich Mountain. Hungry and weary with 
an eight hour march over a most unkindly road, they laid down 
to rest, while Colonel Lander and the General examined the 



country. It was found that the guide was too much scared to 
be with us longer, and we had another valley to cross, another 
hill, another descent beyond that to make, before we could reach 
the Beverly road at the top of the mountain. On this road we 
started at 2 o'clock and reached the top of the mountain, after 
the loss of an hour's time by mistake in the direction of the 
head of the column, in rectifying which the Tenth Indiana took 
the advance. Shortly after passing over the crest of the hill, 
the head of the column, ordered to be covered by a company 
deployed as skirmishers, was fired into by the enemy's pickets, 
killing Sergeant James A. Taggart and dangerously wounding 
Captain Chris Miller, of the Tenth Indiana. 

The column advanced through the dense brushwood, 
emerging into rather more open brushwood and trees, when 
the Rebels opened a fire of both musketry and six-pounders, 
firing some case shot and a few shells. The Tenth advanced 
and took position at "A" plan No. 1*, with one company de- 
ployed as skirmishers covering its front. The Eighth Indiana 
advanced and halted in columns of fours at B. The Thirteenth 
Indiana advanced to C, in an old road, where it was ordered to 
occupy the heights with three companies at d d d, and skirmish 
down the hill keeping strong reserves at the top. 

Three companies were ordered back to E, to cover the de- 
bouche up the valley on the left. The companies of the remain- 
der were to fill in the space in the line marked III, the re- 
maining two companies standing at t. The Nineteenth Ohio 
came down the road and halted in column at H. Owing to a 
misunderstanding of orders, Colonel Sullivan occupied the hill 



*This plan in this report not found. 



14 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



with his whole regiment, and it took forty minutes to correct 
the error and get into proper position as indicated. The com- 
mand "forward" was then given, and another company from 
the right of the Tenth deployed as skirmishers, leaving an in- 
terval through which the Eighth could pass in column and 
charge the Rebel battery on the left of their position at Z as 
soon as our fire had told properly. At the same time Colonel 
Sullivan was to take four companies, and charge around the 
road on the left. 

After an advance of fifty yards and some heavy firing 
from our line the enemy showed signs of yielding and I gave 
orders to the Eighth Indiana and sent them to the colonel of 
the Thirteenth Indiana to charge in column. The Eighth made 
a mistake and got into line at B, where in consideration of their 
abundant supply of ammunition I left them. The Thirteenth 
went into column at D, Plan 2. Seven companies of the Nine- 
teenth Ohio deployed into line at H, and delivered two splendid 
volleys when the enemy broke. Meanwhile I rode around to 
the Thirteenth and drove them into a charge up across the road 
shown at I. The Tenth Indiana charged by fours at T. The 
Eighth came down and charged upon the Rebel front at K. The 
battle was over, the enemy dispersed ; one piece of cannon taken 
at A. another at B, and their dead and wounded scattered over 
the hillside. 

Learning from a captive that the Forty-fourth Virginia 
and some Georgia troops and cavalry were below, and finding 
it too late to continue operations against the Rebel position that 
evening with troops as much exhausted as were ours, and 



threatened too by succors, the troops bivouacked in the position 
shown on plan 2, Lieutenant Colonel Hollingsworth going down 
the ridge with six companies to the position mentioned, within 
a half mile of the Rebel pickets. The two six-pounders cap- 
tured were put in order and under command of Captain Kon- 
kle. Nineteenth Ohio, placed one looking down the Beverly road 
at C, the other at D looking toward Camp Garnett. 

During that rainy night our men bivouacked cheerfully and 
turned out with great promptitude whenever the Rebel move- 
ments alarmed our pickets. About 3 o'clock in the morning of 
the 12th, our pickets brought in a prisoner from the Rebel camp 
from whom I learned their forces were disorganized and prob- 
ably dispersing. This determined the disposition for the attack 
on the camp. I ordered Colonel Beatty, with all the Nineteenth 
Ohio to proceed along the ridge and take their position on the 
south side of the road, and directed Burdsal's cavalry, accom- 
panied by one company of the Tenth Indiana, to reconnoiter 
clown the road. Colonel Sullivan with the Thirteenth Indiana, 
was to follow the movement promptly and by his skirmishers 
to clear the hillside north of the road. These orders were 
obeyed and finding the position abandoned, Burdsal's Cavalry 
and Company C, Tenth Indiana, entered camp about 6 o'clock 
A. M., where they found and took prisoner 10 officers, 5 non- 
commissioned officers and 54 privates, the descriptive list of 
which is hereto attached and marked "A." Colonel Beatty en- 
tered the upper camp about the same time and occupied it, tak- 
ing charge of the property, among which were two six-pounders 
and some eighty tents, four caissons and 100 rounds of am- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



15 



munition. Colonel Sullivan of the Thirteenth Indiana, came 
in and occupied the camp on the north side of the road, and took 
charge of the horses, wagons, tents, tools and implements of the 
Rebels there. The Eighth and Tenth Indiana were left in po- 
sition and were charged with the duty of burying the dead. 
They remained until next morning, the 13th, when the whole 
force moved forward to their present encampment at Beverley. 

Having given the details, I close my report by the follow- 
ing summary of the movement: With strong detachments 
from the Nineteenth Ohio, Eighth, Tenth and Thirteenth In- 
diana and Burdsal's Cavalry, amounting to 1912 rank and file, 
I set out at 5 A. M. of the nth by a circuitous route, through 
a trackless mountain forest, reached the Beverly road at the 
top of Rich Mountain, where I found the enemy advised of my 
approach and in force with two six-pounders, field pieces and 
infantry, from various circumstances judged to have been from 
800 to 1200 strong, though probably not all of them in action. 
We formed about 3 o'clock under cover of our skirmishers, 
guarding well against a flank attack from the direction of the 
Rebels' position, and after a brisk fire, which threw the Rebels 
in confusion, carried their position by a charge, driving them 
from behind some log breastworks, and pursued them into the 
thickets of the mountain. 

We captured twenty-one prisoners, two brass six-pound- 
ers, fifty stand of arms, some corn and provisions. Our loss 
12 killed and 49 wounded. The Rebels had some 20 
wounded on the field. The number of the killed, we could not 
ascertain, but subsequently the number of burials reported to 



this date 135 — many found scattered over the mountain. Our 
troops informed that there were one or two regiments of Reb- 
els toward Beverly, and finding the hour late, bivouacked on 
their arms amid a cold, drenching rain, to await daylight, when 
they moved forward on the enemy's intrenched position, which 
was found abandoned by all except 63 men who were taken 
prisoners. We took possession of two six-pounders, four cais- 
sons, one hundred rounds of ammunition, two kegs and one 
barrel of powder, 19,000 buck and ball cartridges, two stand 
of colors and a large lot of equipment and clothing, consisting 
of 204 tents, 427 pairs pants, 124 axes, 98 picks, 134 spades 
and shovels, all their train consisting of 27 wagons, 75 horses, 
14 mules and 60 pairs harness. 

The enemy finding their position turned, abandoned in- 
trenchments which, taken by the front would have cost us a 
thousand lives, and dispersed through the mountains, some at- 
tempting to escape by the way of Laurel Hill and others aiming 
for Huttonville. Among the former were the command of 
Colonel Pegram which, unable to join the Rebels at Laurel 
Hill, surrendered to the Major General (McClellan) on the 
13th. Our loss in the engagement killed and wounded is shown 
in the statement hereto appended marked B. The list of pris- 
oners taken is shown in the paper hereto appended, marked D. 
The invoice of property captured and turned over to the post 
quartermaster is hereto annexed marked E. 

In closing this report I deem it proper to observe that, 
considering the rawness and inexperience of both officers and 
men, the fact that one-fourth were on picket guard the prev- 



i6 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



ious evening and had made a most fatiguing march through 
rain, and with only inadequate supplies of food their conduct- 
was admirable. Among those who are entitled to special 
mention are Col. Lander, who with the guide led the way into 
the very midst of the action; Colonel Manson, of the Tenth 
Indiana who was everywhere along his line, inspiring the men 
by his voice and presence and who bravely led the charge of 
his regiment. Colonel Benton was ready to obey orders, and 
moved his men with alarcritv. Colonel Sullivan charged with 
his command as the Rebels were dispersing, and captured sev- 
eral of the prisoners. Major Wilson of the Tenth was con- 
spicuous for coolness and promptitude of action. Lieutenant 
Colonel Colgrove of the Eighth Indiana deserves especial 
mention for his coolness while forming his men under fire. 
Major Foster of the Thirteenth Indiana showed coolness and 
self-possession in forming a portion of his men under fire of 
cannons. 

My thanks are due to Captain Kingsbury, my assistant 
adjutant general and Captain A. Irwin Harrison, for their 
valuable and efficient aid in carrying orders under fire. The 
Tenth Indiana was under fire for an hour and a half. The 
Xineteenth Ohio distinguished itself for the cool and hand- 



some manner in which they held their post against a flank 
attack and for the manner in which they came into line and 
delivered their fire near the close of the action. 

I consider Colonel Beatty to have managed his men 
well and to have been ably seconded by Colonel Hollingsworth 
and Major Buckley. For individuals who distinguished them- 
selves under the eyes of their regimental commanders, I re- 
spectfully refer to the reports of Colonels of regiments here- 
with submitted. Very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 
W. S. Rosecrans, 
Maj. S. Williams, U. S. A., Brig. Gen'l Commanding. 

A. A. G., U S. A. Headquarters Army of West Virginia. 

Upon its arrival at Indianapolis, Colonel Manson at once 
proceeded to reorganize the regiment for the Three Years 
Service. About 85 of the three months men reenlisted in the 
three years organization. Others entered the service in other 
organizations, many of them becoming officers, serving until 
the close of the war. 

The following is the muster rolls of the Three Months Or- 
ganization : 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



17 



Muster Roll of Field and Staff Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service 



NAME AND RANK 

Col. Joseph J. Reynolds 

Lt. Col. Jas. R. M. Bryant— 

Maj. Mahlon D. Manson 

Maj. W. C. Wilson 

Adit. Joseph C. Suit 

Q. 31. Zebulon M. P. Hand- 

'Surg. Thomas P. McCrea 

Asst. Surg. Wm. H. Myers— 
Chap. Thomas C. Workman 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 25, 
April 27, 
April 27, 
May 18, 
April 24, 
April 19, 
April 30, 
April 30, 
April 30, 



1S61 
1861 
1801 
1801 
1881 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



May 17, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 0, 1801 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1801 

Aug. 0, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Promotion 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Rich Mtn., Va., 
July 11, 1861 



G. 63d Ind. Apr. 0, 
1863 



1 rno 
3m 12d 
3m 12d 



3m 13d 
3m 18d 
3m 7d 
3m 7d 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



43 yrs 



Total 
Service 



43 years lm 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



Col. 40 Ind. 

Vol. 
3 yrs. 2 days 



3 yrs 3m 17d 
3m 18 days 
3m 7 days 
3m 7 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Promoted Brig. Gen. Mav 17, 1861. Promoted 

Maj. Gen. Nov. 29, 1862. Dead. 
Dead. 

Promoted Colonel May 10, 1861. Dead. 

Dead. 

Transferred to Co. G 128th Ind. June 15, 1865. 

M. O. 128th April 10, 1806. Dead. 
Was with Gen. Scott at capture of Mexico 

City, Mex., Mexican War. Dead. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 



Non-Commissioned Staff 



Sgt. Maj. Jos. M. Douglass- 
es M. S. Dillard C. Donahue 

Drum Maj. John Pickard 

Eife Maj. Prank Pickard 



April 24, 1801 

April 24, 1861 

April 24, 1861 

April 24, 1861 



Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 



Exp. 


Service 


Exp. 


Service 


Exp. 


Service 


Exp. 


Service 



1st Lt. H 3d Ind. 
Cav., Oct. 28, '61 



3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 



5 days 
3d Cav., 6m 



9m 15 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 



Resigned May 2, 1862. Dead. 
Greencastle, Ind. Unknown. 
Omaha, Neb. Unknown. 
Unknown. 



iS 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "A" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County 



NAME AND RANK 



Capt. Chris Miller 

1st Lieut. -John E. Xaylor. 

2nd Lieut. Alvin Gay 

1st Sergt. C. H. Thompson. 



2nd Sergt. Win. H. Maubran 
3rd Sergt. Alexander Colvert 

4th Sergt. Charles Hasty 

5th Sergt. -James A. Taggart 
1st Corp. Jas. M. Downing-. 
2nd Corp. Luther C. Kelly... 
3rd Corp. Jeremiah Kinney.. 
4th Corp. George Coulson... 
Musician Bayou LaF. Lucas 
Musician Edward R. Early.. 

Aggett, George 

Ashby, -Joseph L 

Aubert, John 

Baer, John A. 

Barrett, George W 

Brown, Patrick 

Bollock, Ezekiel, Jr 

Bryant, Frank M. 

Byrnes, William K. 



Entry into> 
the Service 



April IS, 1861 

April 18, 1S61 

April 18, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 
April 23,1861 
April 23, 1S61 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23,1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 2.3, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Cause of 
Discharge 



6, 1861 Exp. 
6, 1861 Exp. 
6, 1861 Exp. 
6, 1861 1 Exp. 

6, 1861 1 Exp. 



6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 



Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Rich Mtn., Va. 

July 11, 1S61 
Near Leeds, Va., 

Dee. 20, 1862 



Rich Mtn., Va., 
July 11, 1861 



Re-Enlisted in 



Aug. 3, '61, (Harris 
Light) 2d N T Cav 
1st Lt. Co. H, 40 

Ind., Dec. 30, '61 
Maj. 6 Cav. Mar. 

5, '64. Lt. Col. 

6 Cav, July 1, '65 

Aug. 30, '61, Srgt. 

Co. D, 26 Ind. 



Aug. 3, '61, Lieut. 
I, 2d N. Y. Cav. 



L 5th Ind. Cav. 
Aug. 19, 1862 



U. S. Navy 



Sergt. Co. A, 40th 
Ind. 



Sergt. Co. A, 40th 
Ind. 



Rich Mtn., Va„ 
July 11, 1861 



Co. H, 3 yrs. 10th 



1st Lieut. D, 72d 
Ind., Jan. 1, '63 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 19d 
3m 19d 
3m 19d 
3m 13d 

3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
2m 18d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



2 yrs 8m 27d 
9m 14 dyas 
6m 10 days 

3 yr 22 days 



3 yrs 4m 7d 



4m 13 days 



In 40th 2 yrs 
6m; in V R C 



3 yrs lm 4d 



1 yr 11m ISd 



Total 
Service 



3m 19 days 
3 yrs 3m 16d 
1 yr lm 2d 

9m 23 days 

3 yrs 4m 5d 



3 yrs 7m 20d 
2m 18 days 
3m 7 days 



3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
7m 26 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
2 yrs 9m 13d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



3 yrs 4m 17d 



3m 13 days 



2 yrs 3m Id 



M. O. as Maj. 2d N. T. Cav. Apr. 30, 1864. 

Disability. LaFayette, Ind. 
Resigned Sept. 4, 1862. Dead. 

Mustered Out 6th Cav. Sept. 15, 1865. Dead. 
Mustered Out as a private Sept. 21, '64. Dead. 

Mustered Out June 23, 1865. LaFayette, Ind. 

Killed at Rich Mtn., Va., July 11, 1861. 

Killed by ears at Lebanon, Ind., 1884. 

Unknown. 

LaFayette, Ind. 

Thorntown, Ind. 

Died Jan. 1, 1S63. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Transferred to V. R. C. from 40th Ind. 

Unknown. 

Mustered Out as 1st Sergt. Co. A 40th, Dec. 4. 
1S64. Dead. 

See Co. H Roll, 3 yrs. 10th. Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Promoted Adjt. 72d Ind. Mar. 17, 1863. Re- 
signed Pee. 19. 1SC4. Ind ianapolis. Lid. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



19 



Muster Roll of Company "A" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Carter, Henry C. 

Carter, Lewis 

Corey, Chas. H. 

Corkins, John 

Flannigan, John 

Frederick, Roderick B 

Godrnan, Jefferson 



Hasty, Jasper N. 
Headley, David 

Holloek, Martin 



HoIIockoh, Frederick 

Holmes, JohD 

Homan, Oliver P. 



Howard, John 

Huffen, Tilghman A — 

Ingle, William 

Johnson, John L. 

Kalberer, Louis 

Lamasney, Michael T.. 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 23, 1861 

April 23,1861 

April 23,1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 



April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 

April 23,1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 



Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 

6, 1861 
6, 1861 

6, 1861 
6, 1861 



6, 1S61 
6, 1861 

6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 



Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Service 
Service 



Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Shiloh, Apr. 7, '62 



Service Aldie, Va., Oct. 9, 
1862 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Mission Ridge, 
I'enn., Nov. 25, '6 



L 5th Cav., Aug. 

21, 1862 
10th Ind. Battery 

40th Ind., Co. A, 

Feb. 19, 1862 

7th Iowa Cav., 

July 16, 1S63 

L 5th Ind. Cav., 
Feb. 20, 1864 

10th Batty. Ind. 

L. A., Jan. 23, '62, 

alias J. T. Harper 



Q 32d, Aug. 24, '61, 
150, Jan. 27, '65 
D. S. Gunboat 
Monoeacy, Sept. 
1865; 7th D. S, 
Infty., June 19,'70 



I, 2d N. Y. Cav 

Aug. 3, '61; D, 135 

Ind., May 23, '64 



I, 2d N. Y. Cav. 
Aug. 3, 1861 
E, 3yrs. 10th 

10th Ind. Battery 
Dec. 17, 1861 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 

3m 13d 
3m 13d 

3m 13d 
3m 13d 



3m 13d 
3m 13d 

3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



2 yr 11m 27d 

10th Bat. 4m 

40th ly, 7th 
Iowa, 1 yr. 
3m 12 days 

1 yr 3 mo 

3 yrs 5m 17d 



3 yrs 3m lOd 
7m 13 days 

2 yrs 6m 25d 

1 yr 6m 13d 

3 yrs 9 mos 



13y 5m 22d 



7m 6 days 



3 yr 10m 20d 



3 yrs lm 8d 



Total 
Service 



13 yrs 7m 5d 



3m 13 days 
10m 19 days 



4 yrs 2m 3d 
3 yr 13 days 
3 yrs 4m 21d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Cutler, Ind. 
Evansville, Ind. 
Dead. 

Discharged L 5th Cav. Aug. 18, 1865. Dead. 

Dead. 

M. O. 40th Ind. Feb. 19, 1863. Disability 
M. O. 7th Iowa Cav. Oct. 28, 1864. Dead. 

M. O. May 30, 1865. Close of war. Dead. 

M. O. 10th Battery July 10, 1865. Clark's Hill, 
Ind. 



M. O. 32d Sept. 7, '64. M. 0.150th Aug. 5, '65. 
M. O. Monoeacy May 26, '70. M. O. 7th TJ. S. 
Infty. June 19, '75. Died Feb. 28, 1880. 



Discharged account of wounds. M. O. 13oth 
Ind. Sept. 29, 1864, as Sergt. Dead. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

M. O. 2d N. Y. Cav. June 23, 1S65. Dead. 

See Co. E, 3 yrs. 10th. LaFayette, Ind. 

M. O. 10th Battery Jan., 1S65. Chicago, 111. 



HISTORY 01? THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "A" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Liverrnore, Benj. W. 
Longlois, Peter L. _ 
Longwell, John W. _ 



Lucas, Edwin R. 

Lucas, Joseph 

Luddington, James A._ 
Lynn, William H. H. _ 

Mackessey, John 

Marriott, Leon 

Michaels, Eli T. 

ililligan, Theop W. _._ 

Murry, Lewis 

Ogan, Henry C. 

Ott, William 

Owens, Thomas 

Preiss, Henry 

Rawles, David 

Robinson, Andrew 

SandelL Frank __ 

Shelby, Jonathan 

Simmons, Henry S. _._ 
Slade, Clark P. 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 23,1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1861 
1861 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 

6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Near Stevensburg, 
Va., Nov. 7, '63 



Re-Enlisted in 



16th Ind. Battery. 
1st Sgt., Feb. 20,'62 
L, 5th Ind. Cav., 

Aug. 22, 1862 
H, 40 Ind., Dec. 30, 
1861: I, 7th Ind. 
Cav., Sept. 5, '63 
I, 2d N. T. Cav., 

Aug. 3, 1S61 



H, 3 yr 10th, also 
Hancock's Corps 



E, 3y 10th: 12 Ind. 

Batty, Dec. 4, 1864 

E, 3 yrs. 10th 

K 3 yrs. 



I, 2d N. T. Cav. 
Aug. 3, 1861 



I, 11th Ind. Cav. 
Jan. 13, 1864 

G 32d Ind., Aug. 

24, 1861 

10th Batterv, 

Dec. 17, 1861 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



I, 2d N. Y. Cav., 
Aug. 3, 1861 



10th Ind. Battery. 

Dec. 17, 1861 

16 mo 

10th Ind. Battery. 



In Tenth 



3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 

3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 



3 yrs 4m 15d 
3 yr 24 days 

2 yrs 9m 20d 

3 yrs lm 14d 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



2 yrs 9m 2d 



1 yr 8m 6d 
3 yr 14 days 
3 yrs lm 7d 



3 yr 10m 20d 



3 yrs lm Kid 



Total 
Service 



3 yrs 7 mos 
3 yrs 4m 7d 
3 yrs lm 3d 

3 yrs 4m 27d 
3 mo 13 days 
3 mo 13 days 
3 mo< 13 days 
3 mo 13 days 
3 mo' 13 days 



1 yr 11m 19d 

3 yrs 3m 27d 
3 yrs 4m 20d 



4 yrs 2m 3d 



3y 4m 29d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



M. O. 16th Battery July 5, 1865, as Captain. 

Died in Alaska. 
M. O. 5th Cav. Sept. 15, 1865. Dead. 

M. O. Dec. 13, 1862. M. O. July 21, 1865, as 
2d Lieut. Dead. 

M. O. I, 2d N. Y. Cav. Oct. 16, 1864, as Corpl. 

LaFayctte, Ind. 
Creston, Iowa. 

M. O. 10th April 21, 1804. Disability. See 3 

yrs. 10th, Co. H. Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Unknown. 

M. O. Sent. 19, 1864. See 3 yrs. 10th. M. O. 

12th Battery July 7, 1S65. LaFayette, Ind. 
See Co. E, 3 yrs. 10th. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Starved at Belle Isle, S. C. Date unknown. 

Unknown. 

M. O. 11th Cav. Sept. 19. '63. LaFayette, Ind. 

M. O. 32d Sept. 7, 1S04, as Sergeant. LaFay 

ette, Ind. 
M. O. Jan. 24, 1S65. Unknown. 

Unknown. 

M. O. 2d N. Y. June 23 1S65. Seattle. Wash. 

Unknown. 

M. O. 10th Batterv Jan. 24, 1S65. Died Mar. 

17, 1SS0. 
Rossville, Kilns. Unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



21 



Muster Roll of Company "A" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Smith, Layton W. 
Sterk, Joseph H. _. 
Stewart, James M. 

Stocks, William 

Tolliver, John 

Truett, Thos. C. -_. 

"Vick, Noah 

Warner, William __. 
Weathers, Robt. A. 
Webb, Samuel G. — 

Willetts, Eli 

Willetts, Isaac 

Wood, Rezin V. — 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 

April 23, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6, 1S61 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 18G1 
6,1801 
6,1861 
6,1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp, 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Seivice 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Rich Mtn., Va., 
July 11, 1S61 



I 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



Ro-Enlisted in 



10th Ind. Battery, 
Dec. 17, 1861 



Rich Mtn., Va., 
July 11, 1861 



Rich Mtn., Va., 
July 11, 1S61 



In Tenth 



Corp. D 40th Ind., 
Dec. 31, 1861 

10th Ind. Battery, 

Jan. 23, 1862 

H, 3 yrs 10th 



Rich Mtn., Va., D, 40 Ind. Infty 
July 11, 1861 Dec. 31. 1861 

I, 2d N. Y. Cav., 

Aug. 5, 1861 

A, 40 Ind., Oct. 31, 

'61, as 2d Lieut. 

1st Sergt. H, 40th 

Ind., Jan. 22, '62 

Lt. H. 3yrs 10th 



3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 
3m 13d 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



3 yrs 6m 23il 



4 yrs in 40th 
3 yrs 5m 17d 



3 yr 11m 20d 
1 yr 2m 17d 



10m 18 days 



Total 
Service 



3y 10m 9d 



4 yrs 3m 13d 

3 yrs 6 mos 
3m 13 days 

4 yrs 3m 3d 
1 year 6 mos 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



M. O. July 10, 1865, 10th Battery, as Sergeant. 

West Lebanon, Ind. 
Covington, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Died at LaFayette, Ind. 

M. O. 10th Battery July 10, 1S65. LaFayette, 

Ind. 
See Co. H, 3 yrs. 10th. No address given. 



M. O. 10th Dec. 25, 1865. LaFayette, Ind. 
Discharged disability Oct. 22, 1862. Unknown. 
M. O. as Captain A 40th Ind. Unknown. 
1 year 2 mos I Deserted from 40th Nov. 4, 1S62. Unknown. 



3m 13 days 



See Co. H, 3 yrs. 10th. 
Danville, III. 



Muster Roll of Company "B" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Warren County 



Capt. James R. M. Bryant— Apr. 23, 1861 

1st Lt. Dickinson Fleming— Apr. 27, 1861 

2d Lt. Levin T. Miller Apr. 27,1861 

1st Set. John P. Neiderour— :Apr. 25,1861 

2d Sgt. Franklin Goben jApr. 25,1861 

3d Sgt. James H. Bonebrake Apr. 25, 1861 

4th Sgt. Hermes P. Downing'Apr. 25,1861 



Aug. 


6, 1861 


Aug. 


6, 1861 


Aug. 


6,1861 


Aug. 


6, 1861 


Aug. 


6, 1861 


Aug. 


6,1861 


Aug. 


6,1861 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 



Rich Mtn., July 
11, 1861 



Mai. 33d Ind. Nov. 

10, 1862 
Lieut. K 33d Ind., 

Sept. 6, 1861 

B 3yrs. 10th 



2d Lieut. H 60th 
Ind., Feb. 25, '62 









3m 


9 


days 


3m 


9 


days 


3m 


12 


days 


3m 12 


days 


3m 


12 




3m 


12 


days 



ly 10m 12d 
3y 10m 15d 



2y 10m 6d 



3m 9 days 
2y lm 21d 
4y lm 27d 

3m 12 days 



Promoted Lieut. Col. See Field and Staff. 
Com. Lt. Col. S6th Ind. Declined. Dead. 
Resigned Sept. 22, 1S64. Wichita Falls, Tex. 

Promoted Capt. K 33d Ind. Nov. 10, '62. Pro- 
moted Maj. 33d Oct. 1, '64. Promoted Lt. 
Col. May 4, '65. M. O. 33d July 21, '65. Dead. 

See "B" 3 years 10th. 

Washington, D. C. 

3y lm ISd Promoted 1st Lieut. H 60th Apr. 2S, '63. Pro- 
moted Capt. H 60th Oct. 1, '63. M. O. Dec. 
31, '64. Consolidated Rcgt. Treasury Dept., 
Washington, D. C. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "B" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Warren County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



1st Cpl. Walter H. Crow—. 
2d Cpl. John TV. Slauter— . 
3d Cpl. George Q. Chandler. 
4th Cpl. Abraham Andrews. 

Musician Henry Halls 

Musician Marion Lutz 

Adams, James M. 

Adams, John Q. 

Adams, George 

Allen, Perry TV. 

Anderson, Peter TV. 

Andrews, Charles 

Asbton, Napoleon 

Benedict, TVilliam 

Bymer, TVilliam 

Brown, Andrew 

Burrows, John TV. 

Bunnell, Lewis 

Busby, TVilliam 

Cadwalder, Elisha 

Cating, Elisha 

Clark, David S 

Cooper, Jacob 



Entry into 
the Service 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



25, 1861 
25, 1S61 
25, 1S61 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25,1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1801 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 





















P 72d Ind., Jan. 
6, 1864 









Corpl. K 33d Ind. 
Sept. 10, 18111 



Re-Enlisted in 



K 33d Ind., Sept. 

16, 1861 
1st Sergt. K 3.3d 
Ind., Sept. 16, '61 



Sergt. E 86 Ind. 

Sept. 4, 1861 
Sergt. P 72d Ind. 

Aug. 28, 1862 



3m 1: 
3m 1: 
3m 1 
3m 1 
3m 1: 
3m 1 



2 days 
2 days 
days 
2 days 
2 days 
2 days 



Corpl. K 33d Ind. 
Sept. 23, 1861 



Corpl. K 33d Ind. 
Sept. 16, 1861 



Sergt. P 72d Ind. 
Aug. 28, 1862 



3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



3 yrs 3 days 
3y 3m 15d 



Total 
Service 



3y 3m 15d 

3y 6m 27d 



ly 8m Sd ly 11m 17d 



2y 9m 2d 
4m 28 days 



3 yrs. 11 d 
8m 7 days 







3y 


9m 28d 


4y lm 7d 


3y 


10m 5d 


4y lm 14d 






2m 


19 days 


5m 28 days 


3y 


10m 5d 


4y lm 14d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



M. O. 33d Sept. 19, 1864. 

M. O. 2d Lieut. K 33d Ind., Dec. 31, 1864. 

Clark's Hill, Ind. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

Danville, 111. 

Carthage, Mo. 

Unknown. 

Transferred D 44th Ind., Jan. 6, 1864. M. O. 
D 44th Ind., Sept. 14, 1865. Unknown. 
Williamsport, Ind. 

M. O. S6th June 6, 1865. Delphi, Ind. 

M. 0. 86th June 6, 1865. Williamsport. Ind. 

Discharged P 72d Jan. 25, 1863. Dead. 

Unknown. 

West Lebanon, Ind. 

M. O. July 21, 1865. Lebanon, Ind. 

Attica, Ind. 

M. O. July 21, 1S65. Vet. unknown. 

Unknown. 

Rossville, 111. 

Died at Bowling Green, Kv., Nov. 16, 1S62. 

Dead. 
Dead. 



M. O. 33d July 21, 1865 
Unknown 



Unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



23 



Muster Roll of Company "B" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Warren County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Ent 
the 



ry into 

Service 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



-I- 



Cronkhite, Stephen __. 

Dalton, James L. 

Davis, Nehemiah 

Elder, Duncan 

Ethington, Scott 

Fleming, Ambrose 

Gemmer, Philip 

Goodwine, William H. 

Graves, Thomas 

Hall, Robert 

Harper, Orrin E. 

Heekley, John J. 

Helms, Jesse A. 

Jackson, David T. _.. 
Johnson, Almond C. _ 

Jordan, William 

Jordan, Miles 

Jordan, Levi 

Keifer, Julius 

Keister, Sampson 

Lee, Adelbert D. 

Link, Lewis 

Maher, Geo. W — 

Meighan, James A. „ 



Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr, 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



25, 1861 
23, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1S61 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
fi, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Sergt. E 86th Ind. 

Sept. 4, 1861 
Lieut. P 72d Ind. 

Aug. 9, 1862 



Capt. E 86th Ind. 
Aug. 14, 1862 



Sergt. K 33d Ind. 

Sept. 16, 1861 

K 33d 

Lieut. F 72d Ind. 
Aug. 9, 1862 



F V2d Ind., Aug. 

4, 1862 
Oorpl. F 72 Ind.. 

Aug. 4, 1862 
Corpl. K 33d Ind., 

Sept. 16, 1861 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



2y 9m 2d 
2y 10m 17d 



2y 9m 23d 



3y 10m 5d 



6m 22 clays 



2y 11m 20d 
2y 11m 20d 
3y 10m 5d 



Total 
Service 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



3 yrs 11 days Promoted 2d Lieut. M. O. 86th as 1st Sergt.. 

June 6, 1865. Alvin, 111. 
3y lm 26d Promoted Captain March, 1S63. M. 0. 72d 

June 26, 1865. Watseka, 111. 
Unknown. 



4y lm 14d 



Dead. 

Post 75, Elkridge, Kan. 

Watseka, 111. 

Promoted Maj. June 13, '63. M. O. 86th June 6, 

1865. Williamsport, Ind. 
West Lebanon, Ind. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. May 1, '65. M. 0. 33d 

July 21, 1865. Williamsport, Ind. 
Williamsport, Ind. 



10m 1 day i Dishonorably dismissed 72d Mar. 1, 

ville, 111. 
Dead. 



3y 2m 29d 
3y 2m 29d 
4y lm 14d 



Dead. 

Perryville, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Marshfield, Ind. 

M. O. F 72d July 24, 



M. 0. P. 72d July 24, 

Marshfield, Ind. 
M. O. 33d July 21, 1865. Dead 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 



Marshfield, Ind. 
1865, as a private. 



24 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "C" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Warren County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Murphy, Martin 

Xorduft, William 

Sowels, Moses 

Owens, William W. 

Parker, Johnson 

Patterson, -John 

Quick, Charles 

Reddick, Flisba 

Hodgers, James 

Rodger?, William 

Rosenbraugh, Mordeeai . 
Rosenbraugh, Norman S 

Salisbury, Thomas 

Solts, William C. '. 

Sheffer, Francis D. 

Shipps, John M. 

Struble, Peter 

Sullivan, Andrew 

Swarts, Isaac 

Swarts, Wesley 

Watts, B«ni. T. 

White, Willi; 

Woodward, James H 



Entry into 
the Service 



Apr. 25, 1861 

Apr. 25, 1861 

Apr. 25, 1861 

Apr. 25, 1861 

Apr. 25, 1S61 



Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25,1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



0, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1S61 
6,1861 
6,1861 

6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Corpl. K 33d Ind 
Sept. 16, 1861 

Sergt. P 72d Ind., 
Aug. 28, 1862 

Sergt. K 33d Ind., 
Sept. 16, 1861 

1st Sergt F V2d 
Ind., Aug. 26, '62 



F 72d Ind., Jan. 
1864 



H 116th Ind., Aug 
17, 1863 



Sergt. E 86th Ind., 
Sept. 4, 1861 



Corpl. E 86th Ind, 
Sept. 4, 1861 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 
3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 

3m 9 days 



In Other Or 

ganizations 



3y 10m 5d 
2 yrs. 10m 
3y 10m 5d 
2y 9m 8d 



ly 8m 8d 



6m 12 days 



2y 9m 2d 



Total 
Service 



4y lm 14d 

3y lm 9d 

4y lm 14d 

3 yrs 17 days 



ly 11m 17d 



9m 29 days 



3 yrs 11 days 



ly 9m Od 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Unknown. 

Promoted 1st Lieut. K 33d Jan. 1, '65. M. O. 

33d July 21, '65. Williamsport, Ind. 
Promoted 2d Lieut. F 72 Mar. 24, '63. M. O. 

as 2d Lieut. F 72d June 26, '65. Unknown. 
M. 0. 33d as a private July 21, '65. Unknown. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. P 72d Mar 2, '63. Promoted 
1st Lieut. P 72d Mar. 24, '63. M. O. 1st Lieut. 
F 72d June 3, '65. Dead. 

Silver Creek, Ohio. 

Transferred D 44th Ind. Jan. 6, "64. M. O. D 

44th Ind. Sept. 14, '65. Unknown. 
Williamsport, Ind. 

M. O. H 116th Ind. Mar. 1, '64. Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

M. O. S6th June 6, 1S65. Dead. 

Unknown. 

Marshfield, Ind. 

Santa Ana, Cal. 

Died ~in 86th at Murfreesboro, Tenn., Feb. 3, '63. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Williamsport, Ind. 

Williamsport, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "C" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Capt. John W. Blake 

1st Lieut. Joseph C. Suit--. 
1st. Lieut. Abram O. Miller 
2d Lieut. Sam'l H. Shortle— 
1st Sergt. Milton W. Newton 
2d Lieut. H. H. Mclntyre— 

3d Lieut. Tbos. J. Griggs_— 

4th Sergt. Uriah Young 

1st Corp. David F. Allen 

2d Corp. Eugene A. Rauth— 

3d Corp. Wm. W. Wilds 

4th Corp. Noah T. Catterlin 

Musician Stephen M. Aiken. 
Mus'n Thos. J. Annentrout. 

Abbott, John W. __1_-1 

Albright, Henry L. 

Alley, James A. 

Amos, Francis F. M. B 

Atwood, William 

Aughe, Samuel 

Baker, William 

Belknap, Leonidas H 



Entry into 
the Service 



Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 

Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 

Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



25, 1S61 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 

25,1861 
25,1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 

25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



Cause of 
Discharge 



6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861! 

6, 18611 
6, 1861 ' 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 1 

6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re Enlisted in 



K 3 yrs. 10th 



C 3 yrs. 10th 
K 3 yrs. 10th 



1st Sgt. K 72d Ind 
Inf. July 17, '62 



C 3 yrs. 10th 



K 3 yrs. 10th 



I 100th Ind. Vols. 
Aug. 20, '62 



K 3 yrs. 10th 



26th Ind Inity. 

100th Ind. Infty. 

K 3 yrs. 10th 



1st Cpl. I 80 Ind. 
Sept. 4, '62 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



3m 12 days 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 

3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 

3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



ly 10m 9d 



2y 9m lid 



Total 
Service 



3m 12 days 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



2y lm 21d 



3m 12 days 



3m 12 days 
3y 23 days 

3m 12 days 



4m 19 days 



3m 12 days 



8m 1 day 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. Indianaolis, Ind. 
Promoted Adjutant. See Field and Staff. 
See Co. C, 3 yrs. 10th. 
See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 
Unknown. 

Promoted 1st Lieut. K 72d. Nov. 14, 1862. 

Promoted Capt. K 72d, April 22, 1863. 

M. O. May 26, 1864. Nashville, Tenn. 
Beatrice, Neb. 

Mission Creek, Neb. 

See Co. C, 3 yrs. 10th. Frankfort, Ind. 

Peoria, 111. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Promoted 1st Lieut. I 100th Ind., Nov. 26, '63. 

Promoted Capt. I 100th Ind., April 1, 1865. 

M. O. 100th June 9, 1865. Effingham, 111. 
See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Dead. 

Dead. Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Frankfort, Ind. 

Post 139, Westfleld, 111., or Kilmore, Ind. 

M. 0. 86th Jan. 23, 1863. Disability. 
Frankfort, Ind. 



26 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "C" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Clinton County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Belknap, Myron H. 

Boyle, James H. 

Blake, James A. 

Blacker, Luke H. 

Carter, Joseph 

Clark, Samuel A. 

Coflman, John S. 

Dawson, Mathias 

Durbon, Amos J. 

Fernald, Benj. W. 

Gibbons, James 

Harlin, Freeman 

Hastwiek, John T. 

Hedriek, Martin V. B.__ 
Hobson, Wm. P. 

Hunt, John W. 

Hutchinson, William T. 
Isgrigg, Andrew J. 



Jacobs, Richard 
Kelly, Samuel __ 
Knable, Milton _ 
Lauden, David . 
3tc-Clurg, John . 



Entry into 
the Service 



Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 

Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 

Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



25, ISfll 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25,1861 
25, 1S61 
25, 1861 



25, 1S61 Aug, 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25,1861 
25, 1801 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 

25,1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 

25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6, 1S61 
6, 1S61 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 j 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 

6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 

6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp, 
Exp, 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Wounded at 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Mission Ridge, 
6a., Nov. 25, '63 



1st Sgt. I 86 Ind. 

Sept. 4, '62 

C 3 yrs. 10th 

I 40th Ind. Infty. 

Dec. 21, '61 

H 3d Ind. Oav. 

Sept. 12, '61 

K 3 yrs. 10th 



Rich Mtn., Va 

July 11, '03 



Re Enlisted in 



K 3 yrs. 10th 
K 3 yrs. 10th 



10th Batty. Ind 
L. A., Jan. 7, '6- 
K 3 yrs. 10th 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Cpl. H S6th Ind., 
Aug. 12, '62 



K 3 yrs. 10th 



H 3d Ind. Cav., 
Mar. 8, 1864 
Sept. 12, 1861 



K 3 yrs. 10th 



O 3 yrs. 10th 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 

3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 

3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



2y 7m 15d 



ly 3m 12d 
3y 8m 27d 



2y 5m 20d 



86th 11m 9d 
2d Reg. C. 
ly 10m 20d 



Total 
Service 



2y 10m 27d 
3m 12 days 
ly 6m 24d 
4 yrs 9 mo 
3m 12 days 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



2y 6m 2d 
3m 12 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



M. O. 86th April 19, 1864. Wounds. 

Frankfort, Ind. 
See Co. O, 3 jrs. 10th. 

Resigned April 2, 1863. Frankfort, Ind. 

M. O. Sth Cav. June 8, 1865. Homer, 111. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Unknown. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Unknown. 

Killed Kcnesaw Mtn., June 27, 1864. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

j Elkhart, Ind. 



I 



3y 2m 20d [Transferred to Vet. Res. Corps Aug. 1, 1S63. 
M. O. June 30, 1S65. Kempton, Ind. 



3d 3y 5m 24d 
5th 1 yr 



3m 12 days 



4y 9m 6d 



3m 12 days 



3m 12 days 



See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Sublett, Mo. 

M. O. Mar. 15, 1S«6. Thorntown, Ind. 

Stockwell, Ind. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Unknown. 

See Co. C, 3 yrs 10th. 

Dead. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "C" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Clinton County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



McLaughlin, Orlandolf 

MeKown, William 

McCoy, Henry D. 

Michael. Joseph 

Miller, Chamberlin B._. 

Miller, James M. 

Moore, James W. 

Moore, William A. 

Myers, Daniel M. 

Xeeves, Daniel 

Packer, Israel 

Packer, Andrew J. 

Peak, Thomas S. 

Price, John O. 

Pritehard, Ephriam _._ 

Richardson, David 

Richardson, John 

Richardson, Richard ___ 

Rodkey, John L. 

Rogers, David 

Rourk, Daniel 

Singleton, William 



Entry into 
the Service 



Slatter, Amos 



Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



25, 18(31 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25,1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 



Apr. 25, 1861 Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Exp. Servrce 



Rich Mtn„ Va., 
•July 11, '61. Stone 
River, Dec. 31, '62 



Re Enlisted in 



F 3 yrs. 10th 
K 3 yrs. 10th 



K 3 yrs. 10th 

O 3 yrs. 10th 

E 3 yrs. 10th 

K 3 yrs. 10th 



K 40th Ind., Feb. 
19, 1862 



A 86th Ind. Inf.. 
Aug. 1, 1862 



LENGTH DP SERVICE 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3ni 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 

3m 12 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



40th, 2y 6m 



Total 
Service 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



3y lm 17d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Paola, Kan. Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Sec Co. P, 3 yrs. 10th. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Unknown. 

Delphi, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Howard, Kan. 

Frankfort, Ind. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

See Co. C, 3 yrs. 10th. 

See Co. E, 3 yrs. 10th. 

See Co. K, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Kohaka, Mo. 

Monitor, Ind. 

Michigantown, Ind. 

Michigantown, Ind. 

Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps Aug., 1864. 

Frankfort, Ind. 
Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Promoted Corporal. M. O. S6th June 6, 1S65. 
Sheridan, Ind. 

Frankfort, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "C" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Clinton County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Tipton, Lorenzo G. 

Thompson, Thomas J. __ 

Thornton, David 

Tan Dyke. John W. S 

Vice, William D. 

Wiseo, Reuben 

Widner, "William 

Wflliams, -John J. 

Williams, James A. 

Wise, John P. 

Witt, John W. 

Torgus, John A. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 

Apr. 25, 



Discharge 

from the 
Service 



1861 Aug-. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6,1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re Enlisted in 



P 3 yrs. 10th 
C 3 yrs. 10th 



I 86th Ind. 



3 yrs. 10th 



K 72d Ind., Mar. 
5, 1864 



E Y2d Ind., July 
25, 1862 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



4m 21 days 



2y 11m Id 



Total 
Service 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



3m 12 days 
Sm 3 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



3y 2m 13d 



See Co. F, 3 yrs. 10th. 

See Co. C, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Unknown. 

Died at Nashville. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Sec Co. C, 3 yrs. 10th. 

Died of wounds, Nashville, Tenn., July 26, '64. 

Unknown. 

Promoted 1st Lieut. E, Dee. 3, '64. M. O. 72d 

Ind. June 26, '65. Frankfort, Ind. 
Thorntown, Eoone Co., Ind. 

Unknown. 



Muster Roll of Company "D" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County 



Capt. William C. Wilson.— April 19,1861: Aug. 6, 1861 



Capt. Samuel L. Wilson May 13, 1861 Aug. 6, 1861 

1st Lieut. Alex. Hogeland-- April 19, 1861 [ Aug. 6, 1861 
2d Lieut. John Brower April 19, 1861 Aug. 6, 1861 



1st Sergt. John JEoeap April 23, 1861 

2d Sergt. Uoees Crapo April 23, 1861 

M Sergt. Peter Cook April 23, 1861 



Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 



Rich Mtn., July 
11, 1861 



Rich Mtn., July 
II, 1801 



Col. 40 Ind., Sept. 

23, '61; Col. 108 
Ind., July 12, '63; 
Col. 135 Ind., May 

24, '04. 

2.1 Lieut. 10th Ind. 
Baty. Nov. 30, '62 
G 3 years 10th 

D 135th Ind. May 

23, '04; P 150 Ind. 

Pcb. 13, '65. 
Scrgt. D 40th Ind. 

Dec. 31, 1861 
Scrgt. I 4th Ind. 

Oav., Aug. 4, '62 



3m 17 days 

2m 18 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 

3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 



9m 19 days 



ly 5m 24d 



4 years 
7m 7 days 



ly 


lm 


6d 


iy 


6m 


123 


3m 17 days 


4y 


3m 


13d 


10m 


22 


days 


3m 13 days 



Promoted Major Aril 25, 1861. 
Resigned Colonel 40th Mar. 27, 1S62. 
M. O. Colonel lOSth July 17, 1S63. 
M. O. Colonel 135th Set. 4, 1864. Dead. 

Honorably discharged May 24, 1864. Dead. 

Sec Oo. G, 3 years 10th. Louisville, Ky. 

M. O. 135th Sept. 29, 1864. Corporal. 

M. O. 150th Aug. 5, 1S65. Sergeant. 

378 S. 2d St., Williamsburg, N. Y. 
Mustered Out 40th Ind. Dec. 31, 1S65. Dead. 



Deserted Mar. 13, 1803. 
Dead. 



Williamsport, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "D" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



4th Sergt. Peter Mattler 

1st Corp]. James W. Knox_. 
2d Corpl. Herman Harms.. 
3d Corpl. Chas. Halderman. 

4th Corpl. Chas. Crane 

Musician William Virgin 

Musician James Gilmartin.. 

Angus, George 

Barber, Roger 

Bergaman, Henry 

Bianea, Louis 

Bumgart, Frederick 

Cleaver, Mahlon 

Clemmens, Frank 

Coe, Azred 

Cook, John 

Cunningham, John 

Curran, Thomas 

Davis, George B. 

Davis, Lewis SC. 

Davis, James H. 

Dale, Oliver S. 

Doherty, Michael 



Entry into 
the Service 



1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23, 1861 

1 23,1861 

1 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 

April 23, 1861 



Apr: 
Apr: 
Apr 
Apr: 
Apri 
Apr! 
Apr: 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apri 
Apr: 
Apr 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. fi, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Rich Mtn., Va., 
July 11, 1861 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



Re-Enlisted in 



. In Other Or- Total 

ganizations Service 



E 3 yrs. 10th Inf. 



1st Sergt. A 63d 

Intl., May 1, '62 

G 3 yrs. 10th Inf. 



years 10th 



G 3 years 10th 



Sergt. G 60th Ind. 
Jan. 15, 1862 



Co. D 40 Ind. Inf 



Oo. C 72d Ind. 
Vols. 



Band Ind. Inf. 



3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 



3m 13 days 



3 yrs 2 days 



3y 3m lod 
3m 13 days 



2y 5m 6d 



2y Sm 19d 



4 yrs 14 days 4y 3m 27d 
3 yrs 6 days 3y 3m 19d 



10m 14 days 
3y lm 14d 



ly lm 27d 
3y 4m 27d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



See Co. E, 3 years 10th. Dead. 

Monitor, Ind. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

M. O. A 03d Ind. as a private May 3, 1865. 

Unknown. 
See Co. G, 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See Co. E, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

See Co. G, 3 years 10th. Dead. 

Promoted 2d Lieut A 11th Ind. Cav. Dec. 4, '63. 

Resigned line 20, 1864. LaFayette, Ind. 
Unknown. 

Dead. 

Blakesburg, Iowa. 

Unknown. 

M. O. 40th Ind. Jan. 15, '65. LaFayette, Ind. 

M. O. "2d Ind. Aug. 19, '62. LaFayette, Ind. 

LaFayette, Ind. 

M. O. 9th Ind. Aug. 19, '62. Indianapolis, Ind. 

A 40th Ind. Dead. 



3° 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "D" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County (Continued) 



XAME AND RANK 



Durgan, Edward 

Ensbarger, -James W. 
Felix, Charles, Sr. .._ 

Fink, John 

Foley. David 

Garver, Frank 

Gentes, Daniel 

Gentes, Isaac 

Gobat, Frederick A — 
Graves, George W. — 
Grooms, James YS". __ 

Gwin, James W. 

Hamilton, Squire 

Henry, John 

Hoffman, Julius 

Jones, Charles 

Jones, Oliver 

Kinder, Joseph 



Koll, Louis 

Laughton, James C. 

Lucas, Herman 

Mattjx, Thomas 

Medry, James 

Miller, Levi 

HeCabe, David 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1861 
1S61 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug 
Aug 



1881, Aug 
1861 Aug 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



,1861 Aug. 
, 18611 Aug. 



April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 



0, 1S61 
6, 1861 
6, 1S61 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1S61 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 



Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1801 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Kxp 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Rich Mtn., Va., 
July 11, 1861 



Shelby, Term., 

July, 1863 

Cartersville, Ga., 

June, 1864 



Re-Enlisted in 



Co. G 40 Ind. Inf. 



G 3 years 10th 



Private D 40 Ind.. 

Dee. 31, 1861 

G 100th Ind., Aug. 

3, 1862 



A 116th Ind., uJly 

30, 1863 

G 3 years 10th 

H 40th Ind., aJn. 
23, 1862 



10th Ind. Battery 



H 3d Ind. 
Cav. 



32d Ind 1st Ind. 
Battery 



E 150th Ind. 
I 2d N. Y. Cav. 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3ra 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 

3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m I;: .l;iys 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



1 year 



3y 11m 21d 
2y 10m 5d 



7 months 



10m 18 days 



3y 6m 23d 
3 years 



5m 19 days 
2y 10m 2d 



Total 
Service 



ly 3m 13d 



4y 3m 4d 
3y lm 18d 
3m 13 days 
10m 13 days 



ly 2m Id 



3y 7m 3d 

3y 3m 13d 



9m 2 days 
3y lm 2d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



M. O. 40th Ind. as Corporal Oct. 25, 1865. 

West Point, Ind. 
Unknown. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See Co. G, 3 years 10th. 



Promoted 2d Lieut. D 40th Sent 1, 1865. M. O. 
as 1st Sergt. D 40th Dec. 21, '65: vet. Dead. 
M. O. June 8, 1865, G 100th Ind. Dead. 

Dead. 

M. O. A 116th, Mar. 1, 1864. Dead. 

See G, 3 years 10th. 

Discharged H 40th Ind. as Sergt. Nov. 4, 1862. 

Dead. 
Unknown. 

Deserted. Unknown. 

West Point 

M. O. 10th Batty. July 7, 1865. Dead. 

M. O. Sept. 10, 1S64. Indianapolis, Ind. 



In Kansas somewhere. 

Dead. 

LaFayette, Ind. 

M. O. 150th Ind. Aug. 5, 1S65. Dead. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Battle Ground, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



31 



Muster Roll of Company "D" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



MeGlothlin, James I April 

Orb, Francis J. April 

O'Connor, James 'April 

Perrine, James M. April 

Pinkerton, William 0. 'April 

Priehert, John H. lApril 

Rank, Henry April 

Rextrew, Valentine April 

Robinson, Isaac X. April 

Scblessmiller, Valentine April 

Snoddy Lewellyn 0. April 

Snyder, Levi April 

Steckel, William F. April 

Stall, Joseph April 

Solomon, Isaac 'April 

Thomas, John L. lApril 

Truwiger, Aaron 'April 

Trucker, Tolliver B. __. 
Van Buren, Wm. H. __. 

Veach, Robt. 

Weinhardt, John H 

Washer, Henry 

Whitehead, James 

Young, Henry 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
Youst, Peter ' April 



23, 1861 
23, 1S61 
23, 1S61 
23, 1S61 
23, 1861 
23, 1S61 
23, 1861 

23,1861 
23,1861 
23, 1861 
23,1861 
23,1861 
23,1861 
23,1861 
23, 1861 
23,1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23,1861 
23, 1861 
23,1861 
23,1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 15, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp, 
Exp, 
Exp, 
Exp, 
Exp, 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Rich Mtn., Va., 
July 11, 1861 



Chickamauga Ga 
Set. 10, 1863 



Rich Mtn., Va. 
July 11, 1861 



Re-Enlisted in 



K 40th Ind., Feb, 
19, 1862 



H 40th Ind., an 
22, 1862 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



G 32d Ind. 



Co. K 150 Ind. Inf. 



In Tenth 



3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 

3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



3y 10m 2d 

40th: 
!y 35th U. S 
3y lm 2d 



2y 2m 26d 



5ra 3 days 



Total 
Service 



7y lm 15d 
Sy 4m 15d 



8m 16 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Dead. 

Ooffcyvflle, Kans. 

LaFayette, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

M. O. K 40th Ind. Dec. 21, '65, as Crpl. R. E. 35 
U. S. Infty., 3 years. Died Feb. 21, 1905. 

M. O. K 40th as Sergt. Dec. 21, 1865; et. 

South Bend, Ind. 
Unknown. 

See E, 3 years 10th. 

Dayton, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Dayton, Ind. 

Died at Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 20, 1863. 

Unknown. 

Missing at Rich Mtn. July 11, 1801. Dead. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

M. O. 150th Aug. 5, 1865. Dead. 

Dead. 

See E, 3 years 10th. 

LaFayette, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "E" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Capt. William Taylor April IS, 1S61 

1st Lieut. John A. Stein April IS, 1S61 

Sd Lieut. Henry C. Tinney— April IS, 1861 
1st Sergt. Edward O. Brown April 23, 1861 

2d Sergt. David MeBride April 23, 1861 

3d Sergt. Adam Orth Benin April 23, 1861 
ith Sergt. Harvey J. Sawyer April 23, 1861 

lit CorpL Amos E. Goe April 23, 1861 

2d Corpl. Marc Ashaffenburg April 23, 1861 

3d Corpl. John Laurie April 23, 1861 

4th CorpL Daniel S. McCoy. April 23, 1861 
Musician Ethan Allen -Jones April 23, 1861 

Musician Bose J. Taylor April 23, 1861 

Armstrong, Druse April 23, 1861 

BaD, William T. j April 23, 1861 

Blackmer, Collins April 23, 1861 

Brewer, Chas. A. April 23, 1861 

Briley, John I April 23, 1861 

ter, Jesse April 23, 1861 

Clark, "William B. I April 23, 1861 

Clark, Allison i April 23, 1861 

Onrmorjs, Tbeo. L. April 23, 1861 

Crotise, George W. April 23, 1861 

.-, Alfred April 23, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Cause of 
Discharge 



i 



Aug. 6, 1861 | 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 0, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 0, 1861 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Major 40th Ind. 



Adjt. lllth Ind. 
A. A. G. 



Capt. A 130th Ind 
Lieut. G 100 Ind. 
19th U. S. Infty. 

Lieut. 72d Ind. 

G, 3 years 10th 



G 20th Ind. 



Co. L, 5th Ind. 
Cav. 



E, 3 years 10th 
E, 3 years 10th 



E, 3 years 10th 
C 40th Ind. 



10th Battery Ind 
L. A. 



Lieut, loth Hatty. 
Ind. L. A. 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 18 days 
3m IS days 
3m IS days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3ni 14 days 



In Other Or 
ganizations 



5m 16 days 



3 years 3m 



5m 21 days 
2y 10m 12d 



2y 5m 17d 



2 years 9m 



3y 6m 23d 



Total 
Service 



9m 4 days 
3m 18 days 
3y 6m 18d 



9m ;.» days 
3y lm 26d 



2y 9m Id 
3m 14 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



3 yrs 14 days 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



3m 14 days 



3y 10m 7d 



3y lm 17d 3y 5m Id 



Dead. 

Promoted A. A. G. on Staff of Gen. T. A. Mor- 
ris. Died at LaFayette, Ind., Aug. 14, 1885. 

Resigned from 40th Ind. Dee. 25, 1864. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Mustered Out 150th Aug. 5, '65. LaFayette, Ind. 

Mustered out 100th June 15, 1865. Dead. 

Unknown. 

Resigned from 72d Ind. Dec. 10, 1864. 

Denver, Coio. 
See G, 3 years 10th. 

Soldiers' Home, LaFayette, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Killed at Fair Oaks, Va. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

See E, 3 years 10th. 

See E, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Mustered Out 10th Battery July 10, 1S65. 

Robinson, 111. 
Unknown. 

Mustered Out 10th Battery July 24, 1S65. 
Orange City, Fla. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



33 



Muster Roll of Company "E" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Crapp, George 

Diffenbaugh, Chas. 
Dernerley, Jacob _. 

Derby, Nisei 

Earhcart, David B. 
Eldred, Jobn D. .._ 



Entry into 
tbe Service 



\pril 23, 1881 
Vpril 23, 1801 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 



Elenga, Remb't R. April 

Elliott, James W. April 

Elliott, David L. I April 

Elliott, William JApril 

Ellis, Quincy A. lApril 

Franklin, Harmon April 

Fleek, Nicholas .April 

Gault, Jobn B. [ April 

Golt, John W. April 

April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



Heyn, Isaac 

Hindman, Samuel 

Hinds, Charles C. 

Hood, William 

Hunt, Edgar C. 

Jackson, Hannibal R. April 

James, John lApril 

Jennings, Jasper N. lApril 



23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1801 

Aug. 0, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 0, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 0, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Jettersviile, Ga., 
.lime 5, 1865 



G, 3 years 10th 

E 3 years 10th 

E 3 years 10th 

72d Ind. 

Sgt. Moj. 135; Lt, 

Co. B 150 Ind. Inf 

I 2d N. Y. Cav. 

Aug. 6, 1801 



G, 3 years 10th 



10th Ind. Battery 



Adjt. 1st Regt. 
Ind. Art. 



E, 3 years 10th 



12th Battery Ind 
L. A. 



E, 3 years 10th 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 clays 
3m 14 days 
8m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



9m 24 days 
3y 10m 22d 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 clays 
3m 14 days 
ly lm 8d 
4y 2m 2d 



3m 14 days 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



3m 14 days 
8m 24 days 



3m 14 days 



See G, 3 years 10th. 
See E, 3 years 10th. 
Sec E, 3 years 10th. 
Unknown. 

Mustered Out 135th Ind. Sept. 29, '64. 

Mustered Out 150th Ind. Aug. 5, '65. Dead. 
Oaptured in Wilderness May 5, '64. Escaped 

May 15, '64. Rejoined Command at Cold 

Harbor, Va. LaFayette, Ind. 
Killed at Rich Mtn., July 11, 1861. 

See G, 3 years 10th. Arab, Marshall Co., Ala. 



Transferred to V. R. C. Denver, Colo. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

LaFayette, Ind. 

Dead. 

Rising Sun, Ohio Co., Ind. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

See E, 3 years 10th. 

LaFayette, Ind. 

Topeka, Kans. 

E, 3 years 10th. 



34 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "E" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Johnson, Lewis 

Joyce, Andrew 

Lucas, Van Rensselaer 

Lutz, Joseph S. 

Mace, Edward H. 

Miesse, Adams 

Murphy, Chas. A. 

Powell, John W. 

Powers, Jesse 

Quigley, William 

Raines, Colburn 

Ready, Martin 

Rose, Nelson J. 

Russell, Daniel R. 

Russell, Jasper X. 

Buss, 'WiUiam 

Schilling, William 

Schraeder, Albert 

Seifert, Alexander 

Sivey, Albert M. 

Simler, Henry 

Simpson, John D. 

Slessinger, Lewis 

Snow, Orren D. 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



■23, 1S61 
23, 1S61 
•23, 1861 
■23, 1861 
■23, 1861 
■23, 1S61 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
•23, 1861 
■23, 1861 
23, 1861 
■23, 1861 
23, 1861 
-23, 1861 
23, 1861 
■23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 
23, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 6, ISfil 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



Re Enlisted in 



E, 3 years 10th 



E, 3 years 10th 



Capt. 13th U. S. 
Infty. 



10th Battery Ind 
L. A. 



Hospital Steward 
11th Ind. Cav. 
I 4th Ind. Cav. 



In Tenth 



E, 3 years 10th 
E, 3 years 10th 



E, 3 years 10th 



N. C. S. 3 yrs 10th 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



3y 1m 7d 



ly 9m 6d 
ly 5m 22d 
2y 10m 13d 



Total 
Service 



3m 14 days 



3m 14 days 



3y 4m 21d 



t yrs 20 days 
ly 9m 4d 
3y 1m 27d 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



3m 14 days 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



See E, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Post 133, Suspension Bridge, N. Y. 

Mustered Out 10th Battery Jan. 24, 1865. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Mustered Out 11th Cav. Sept. 4, '65. Dead. 

Mustered Out 4th Ind. Cav. July 29, '65. Dead. 

Mustered Out 72d Ind. July 24, 1865. 

LaFayette, Ind. 
See E, 3 years 10th. 

See E, 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

See E, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

See N. C. S., 3 years 10th. 

2513 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



35 



Muster Roll of Company "E" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Tippecanoe County (Continued) 





Entry into 
the Service 


Discharge 
from the 

Service 


Cause of 
Discharge 






LENGTH OE SERVICE 




NAME AND RANK 


Wounded at 


Re-Enlisted in 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 


Stoll, Charles 


April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 


Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 






3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 11 days 






Dead. 






Lieut. 35th Ind. 
Co. E 


3y 9m 14d 


i yrs 28 days 


Mustered Out as Captain Sept. 30, 1865. 
























3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 






Dead. 


Wright, Lewis _ 




3d Ohio Cav. 






Unknown . 



Muster Roll of Company "F" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Clay County 



Capt. Ezra Olds 

1st Lieut. Demetrius Parsley 
2d Lieut. Isaac W. Sanders.. 



1st. Sergt. Junius Hunt 

2d Sergt. Webster Nance 

3d Sergt. Lewis Manker 

4th Sergt. Bobt. W. Osborne 

1st Corpl. Geo. W. Kress 

2d Corpl. William Lovessey. 

3d Corpl. Elisha Hadden 

4th Corpl. Rodney Grimes... 
Musician Robt. B. Wright.. 

Musieian John C. Britton 

Albright, Henry 



April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 



April 25, 
April 25, 
April 25, 
April 25, 
April 25, 
April 25, 
April 25, 
April 25, 
April 25, 
April 25, 
April 25, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 

Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 






Capt. Co. B 133d 
Ind. Infty. 




Cav. Co. G 
Capt. Co. G 8th 
Ind.: Capt. Co. 
D 115 Ind.; Lieut. 
Co. B 133 Ind. 






Lieut. IT. S. C. T. 












L. A. 












125th 111. 









days 

days 
days 

days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 



3m IS days 
2y 10m 19d 
11m 26 days 



7 months 
3y 2m Id 

ly 3m Sd 



Mustered Out 133d Ind. Sept. 24, 1864. Dead. 

Mustered Out 2d Cav. July 22, 1865. Unknown. 

Mustered Out VSth Oct. 5, 1862. Mustered Out 
115th Ind. Feb. 12, 1864. Mustered Out 133d 
Ind. Sept. 24, 1864. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Topeka, Kans. 

Brazil, Ind. 

Clay City, Ind. 

Terre Haute, Ind. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Vermilion, 111. 

Brazil, Ind. 

Center Point, Ind., or Indianapolis, Ind. 



36 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "F" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Clay County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Armstrong, Frank W. April 

BeDnefield, Robt. N. April 

Bennefleld, Benj. S. April 

Belk, William April 

Belk, Benj. F. April 

Brockney, James K. April 

Britton, Demas D. April 

Bresler, Daniel H. April 

Brush, George W. April 

April 
April 
April 



Brush, "William A. . 
Bowling, Richard T. 

Burk, John 

Chipman, Frederick A. April 

Chambers, Jesse April 

Cordery, William April 

Conwell, Benj. F. April 

Davis, Isaac P. April 

Dimlavey, John April 

Earlish, Christian April 






Eamhart, Henry 11. S.. 
Eaglesfleld, Geo. W. _.. 

Eazlev, Godfrey 

Ford, London 



April 
April 
April 
April 



25, ISfll 
25, 1S01 
25, ISfll 
25, 1S61 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 
25, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 0, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause ol 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



78th Ind.; 135th 
Ohio 



Co. E 2d Ind. 

Cav. 

2d Ind. Cav. 

2d Ind. Cav. Co. B 



Rich Mtn., July 
11, 1861 



2d Ind. Cav. 
Co. B 



LEXGTH OF SERVICE 



12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
IS days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 
12 days 

12 days 

13 days 
12 days 



In Other Or 
gamzations 



2 months 



3y 9m 27d 



ly 3m 6d 



ly 6m 21d 



Total 
Service 



5m 12 days 



4y lm 7d 



ly 6m 18d 



ly 10m 3d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Terre Haute, Ind. 

Dead. 

Mustered Out 2d Cav. Oct. 4, 1864. Dead. 

Harmony, Ind. 

Mustered Out 2d Cav. July 22, 1865. 

Harmony, Ind. 
Brazil, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Stanton, Clay Co., Ind. 

Brazil, Ind. 

Cardonia, Clay Co., Ind. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Humbolt, Kan. 

Brazil, Ind. 

Brazil, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

Turner, Ind. 

Died from wounds. 

Mustered Out 2d Cav. July 22, 1S65. 

Terre Haute, Ind. 
Unknown. 

Dead. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



37 



Muster Roll of Company "F" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Clay County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Gonter, Samuel 

Gifl'ord, Joseph C. 

Gibbons, Jacob 

■Hix, Harvey 

Hansil, George W. 

Hollingsworth, Robt. M. 

Hill, Roswell S. 

Keeler, David 

Keeler, Uriah 

Kidd, Andrew J. 

Leasure, James A. 

ilcDonald, Alexander 

Morgan, George W. 

Moore, John 

Moore, William E. 

Moore, James A. 

Moore, Clark A. V. 

Mark, Jamesc A. 

Mathews, James T. 

Myers, John 

Nicholson, Andrew 

Olds, Alonzo B. 

Parsley, Edwin B. 

Pell, John P. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



April 25, lSlil 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1801 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
I April 25, 1861 



Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1801 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1801 
Aug. 0, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 0, 1801 
Aug. 0, 1861 
Aug. 0, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 0, 1861 
' Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Wounded at 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Reseca, Ga., May 
14, 1861 



West Point, Ga„ 
April, 1805 



2d Ind. Cav. 

2d Ind. Cav. Co. B 

Promoted Major 

2d Ind. Cav. 

2d Ind. Cav. Co. G 



Re Enlisted in 



2d Ind. Cav. 

Co. G 

71st Ind. 6th Cav. 



2d Ind. Cav. Co. G 



2d Ind. Cav. Co. G 



8th Ind. Battery 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 



days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



ly 2m 6d 



3m 10 days 



9m 20 days 
6m 8 days 
2y 11m 2Vd 



Total 
Service 



ly 5m lSd 



6m 22 days 



ly lm 8d 
9m 20 days 
3y 3m 9d 



2y 11m 27d 



2y 11m 27d 



3y 3m 9d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Mustered Out 2d Cav. Dec. 13, 1862. Unknown. 

Brazil, Ind. 

Center Point, Ind. 

Center Point, Ind. 

Bridgeton, Ind. 

Dead. 

Leg amputated. Mustered Out 2d Cav. July 

22, 1865. Brazil, Ind. 
Missing in action, Atlanta, Ga., July 30, 1864. 

Brazil, Ind. 
Mustered Out 2d Cav. Oct. 4, 1864. Unknown. 

Brazil. Ind. 

Unknown. 

Mustered Out 2d Cav. Oct. 4, 1804. Unknown. 

Pueblo, Colo. 
3y 3m 9d Mustered Out 2d Cav. Oct, 4, '64. Brazil, Ind. 

JDead. 

Dead. 

Brazil, Ind. 



2y 6m Id 



Is living. Pension claim on flic. 

Mansfield, Ind. 
Unknown. 

Mustered Out 8th Batty. July 20, 1S65. 

Unknown. 
Dead. 



Harmony, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "F" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry^ Three Months-,' Service — Clay County (Continued) 







Discharge 

from the 

Service 


Cause of 
Discharge 


Wounded at 


! 

Re-Enlisted in 


LENGTH OP SERVICE 




NAME AND RANK , f^^ice 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 


Pratt. Isaac F. _ . April 25, 1S61 


Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 






3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 








Painter, William . __l April -'5, 1S61 












Pavne, John A. April 25, 1881 
Bobinson, Robt. j April 25, 1861 





Lt. 2d Intl. Cav. 
Co. H 


2y 2m IGd 


3y 2m 16d 


Mustered Out 2d Cav. Mar. 11, 1S65. Unknown. 


Eoriden, Abel __ - April 25, 1861 
Eilev. James - . ..April 25, 1861 





2d Ind. Cav 
G & B 

2d Ind. Cav. 35th 
Ind. Infty. 
Iowa Regt. 

2d Ind. Cav. 


2y llm 4d 


2y 5m 2Sd 


Starved to death in Andersonville prison. 


Stalleup, James H. TV. __ I Anril 25, 1S61 








SnmVard, 'Miles Y. 


April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 








Stunkard, James 










Srnsart. Franklin T) 


Badly wounded 










Tatham, Samuel 










Ward, Frederick 












Wettfall, Tillman 








Westiall, Winston __ _ __ 












Ynr-nm. Samuel 












1 





HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



39 



Muster Roll of Company "G" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Montgomery County 



NAME AND RANK 



Capt. Mahlon D. Manson... 
1st Lieut. James H. Watson 
1st Lt. Ebenezer H. Morgan 
2d Lt. James H. Vanarsdal- 
lst Sergt. James H. Wasson 
2d Sergt. Leroy W. Greene.. 
3d Sergt. Thomas T. Martin 

4th Sergt. Isaac Davis 

1st Cpl. David W. Hartman 
2d Corpl. Thomas M. Powell 
3d Cpl. James H. Tammany 
4th Corpl. Joseph Simpson 

Musician Andrew Gray 

Musician John Ott 

Austin, Abner V. 

Bailey, Charles 

Birchfield, William P 

Boots, James 

Borden, John D. 

Bloss, Charles 

Britton, Aaron 

Burdett, Albert 

Cheeney, Hamilton 

Clew, John 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 17, 
April 17, 
April 17, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 
Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Sen 7 ice 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Sendee 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



B, 3 years 10th 



20th Ind. Battery 



B, 3 years 10th 



3m 19 
3m 10 
3m 19 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 



days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



2y 8m 9d 



Total 
Service 



2y 11m 21d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



See Field and Staff. 

Promoted Captain April 26, 1861. Dead. 

Dead. 

See B, 3 years 10th. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Thorntown, Ind. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Mustered Out 20th Batty. June 28, 1865, as 

Corporal. Craw*fordsville, Ind. 
Alma, Harlan Co., Neb. 

Ci awf ordsville, Ind. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

See B, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 



40 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "G" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Montgomery County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Colwell, 'William __ 
Conway, John M. 
Cape, George L. _. 

Coombs, Eli 

Coombs, John 

Cory, Coramando 
Davidson, .James .. 

Devoe, Allen 

Dewling, William _ 
Duncan, "William S. 
Edmonds, William 
Eieher, David C. __ 
Elliott, John T. _._ 

Elliott, John 

Evans, Morris B. - 

Fryer, John R. 

Fulwider, Andrew . 

Ginger, George 

Ginger, John 

Grinsted, Xoah J. _ 

Oi-ubb, Joseph 

Hartness, Thomas 
Hays, Bobt. A. ... 
Hemphill, Jamea .. 



Entry into Discharge 
the Service from tlle 
Service 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



24, 1S61 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 
24, 1861 

24, 1861 

25, 1861 
25, 1861 



Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug 6, ISB1 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp, 



Wounded at 



Service 

Service ___ 

Service 

Service . 
Service ... 

Service 

Service 

Service' 

Servicel 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Service 

Servicel 



Re-Eniisted in 



B, 3 years 10th 



B, 3 years 10th 
B, 3 years 10th 
B, 3 years 10th 



Co. I 11th Ind. 
Inf. 



Co. I 11th Ind. 
Inf. 



B, 3 years loth 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 clays 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 

12 days 



In Other Or 
ganizations 



3y 10m 25d 



3y 10m 25d 



Total 
Service 



3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 



4y 2m 7d 



4y 2m 7d 



3in 12 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



See B, 3 years ICth. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See B, 3 years 10th. 

See B, 3 years 10th. 

See B, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Mustered Out 11th Ind. Inf. July 26, 1S65, 

Unknown. 
Dead. 



Mustered Out 11th Ind. Inf. July 26, 1865. 

Unknown. 
Unknown. 



Dead. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 
See B, 3 years 10th. 
Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Demi. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



41 



Muster Roll of Company "G" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Montgomery County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Hickman, William H 

Hickman, John 

Hillis, Levi H. 

Hogsett, John W. - 

Hauver, Barnet 

Jarret, Henry 

Lane, Henry S. 

Liter, Martin 

McMaken, Benj. r. _ 
McNeeley, William H 

Miller, Isaac F. 

Mongaran, Frank — 

Murphy, Charles 

Nicholson, Elihus 

Norman, Thomas J. 

O'Hara, Henry 

Ornbaum, Andrew M 

Opperman, John 

Powell, George W. __ 

Rooney, John 

Runner, William 

Sham, Seigfried 

Simpson, James M. _ 
Smith, James 



Entry into 
the Service 



Apr 
Apr. 
Apr 
Apri 
Apr; 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apri 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apri 
Apr: 
Apri 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1801 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1S61 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re Enlisted iu 



B, 3 years 10th 
B 72d Ind. 



B, 3 years 10th 



B, 3 years 10th 



I 11th Ind. Int. 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 
3m 12 



days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



3 yrs 10 day; 



3m 12 days 
3y 3m 22d 



3m 12 days 



3m 12 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Crawiordsville, Ind. 

Bagnell, Mo. 

Dead. 

See B, 3 years 10th. Saltilloville, Ind. 

Mustered Out 72d Ind. July 24, 1865. Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Ehnwood, 111. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

See B, 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Michigantown, Clinton Co., Ind. 

See Co. B, 3 years 10th. 

Dayton, Ind. 

Dead. 

Glendale, Colo. No such P. O. 

Dead. 

Shannondalc, Ind. 

Dead. 

Terre Haute, Ind. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 



4-' 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "G" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Montgomery County (Continued) 







Discbarge 

from the 

Service 


Cause of 
Discharge 


Wounded at 




LENGTH OE SERVICE 




NAME AND RANK 


Entry into 
the Service 


Re -Enlisted in 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 




Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exd. Service 






3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 
3m 12 days 










April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1S61 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 
April 25, 1861 




Lieut." 17th Batty. 
Ind. L. A. 


3y lm ISd 


3 yrs. 4m 


Mustered Out 17th Batty. April 30, 1864. 

LaPayette, Ind. 
Dead. 


Sprasne, Daniel G. _ 


























"Williamson, William H. 










Unknown. 



Muster Roll of Company "H" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Putnam County 



Capt. "William Conkiin 

1st Lieut. E. R. Bladen 

2d Lieut. David X. Steele 

1st Sergt. Ostrander Dicks.- 
2d Lieut. William L. Telton 
3d Sergt. Harrison "Wright-- 
4th Sergt. Sam! X. Rodgers 
1st CpL Marshall A. lloore 
2d Corpl. Lyeurgus Stoner— 
3d CorpL John W. Baker— 

4th Corpl. Adams Jones 

Musician James S. Conklin. 
Musician Arthur M. Walls.- 

Barnes, Eli -— 

Battison, Daniel — 



April 26, 
April 26, 
April 26, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 
1861 Aug. 
18611 Aug. 
1861 Aug. 
1861 Aug. 
1861' Aug. 
1861 Aug. 
1861, Aug. 
1861! Aug. 
1861 Aug. 



6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 18(51 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Major 71 Ind. Int. 



3m 11 days 
3m 11 days 
3m 11 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 



Killed at Richmond, Ky., Aug. 30, 1862. 

Spencer, Ind. 

See Field and Staff, 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Effingham, 111. 

Greencastle, Ind. 

Greencastle, Ind. 

Carpentersville, Ind. 

Dead. 

See N. C. S., 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



43 



Muster Roll of Company "H" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Putnam County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Bladen, James M. .. 
Bladen, Franklin — 
Bruner, Wm. H. .... 
Browning, Samuel _. 
Brown, Henry F. __. 

Burnett, Irani 

Chapin, Geo. T. 

Cheszeski, Frederick 
debaters, Ezra I,. . 
Collins, James H. _. 
Cofl'man, John S. ... 
Cooper, John W. _-. 

Dicks, Alford 

Eakin, William 

Earp, Henry 

Fuller, Nathan C. - 

Gibb, John 

Gibbs, Lorenzo A. _. 

Gross, Peter 

Hadden, William F. 

Hamlin, Marion 

Hardin, John W. ... 

Hardin, Benj. E. 

Harvey, Stephen 8. - 



Entry into 
! the Service 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
Aprii 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
186i 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1881 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

0, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1881 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Fxp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



He-Enlisted 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 13 days 

sicp si lug 

13 days 

3m 13 days 



3m 1 



3m 13 days 



3m 1 
3m 1 
3m 1 
3m 1 
3m 1 
3m 1 
3m 1 
3m 1 



days 



days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
3 days 
3 days 



3m 13 days 



3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Dead. 

Dead. 

Lena, Parke Co., Ind. 

Chanute, Kans. 

Unknown. 

Blue Rapids, Kans. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Carpentersville, Ind. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Denver, Colo. 

Unknown. 

Greencastle, Tnd. 

Deserted May 1, 1861. Unknown. 

Greencastle, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Oconee, 111. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 



44 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "H" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service— Putnam County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Hausier, Clinton M. J. 

Hawley. Philo C. 

Hilton, William 

Huston, Yolney P. 

Hughes, John 

James, Franklin 

James, Thomas J. 

Jones, George il. 

Kinder, John 

Kiser, David 

Kling, George 

Lamasters, Fielding _.. 

Lane, John 

Lane, Robert 

Lee, John TV. 

Moore, Franklin J. 

Moore, Tilghman 

ilyres, William 

JleCTay, Henry H. ___ 

MeGill, James H. 

Mellvaine, Jacob 

HcClain, Calvin O. ... 
Parker. William 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 
April 24, 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



isai 

1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6, 1S61 
6, 1S61 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 
6, 1861 



Cause ot 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Rich Mtn., Va., 
July 11, 1861 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



Ir 


Tenth 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3 m 


13 


chiys 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 




13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3nl 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3 m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


3 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 


3m 


13 


days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Greeneastle, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Greencastle, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Columbus, Ind. 

Charleston, 111. 

Greeneastle, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

North Middleton, Bourbon Co., Ey. 

Died July 27, 1861. Wounds. 

Quiney, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Greeneastle, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



45 



Muster Roll of Company "H" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Putnam County (Continued) 





Entry into 
the Service 


Discharge 

from the 

Service 


Cause of 
Discharge 


Wounded at 


Re-Enlisted in 


LENGTH OF SERVICE 




NAME AND RANK 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 


Rankin, Oliver ... April 24, 1S61 


Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Sei-vice 
Exp. Sennce 
Exp. Sei-vice 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Sennce 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 






3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
2m 11 clays 






See N. 0. Staff, 3 years loth. 










Dead. 




April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1881 
April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1861 
April 24, 1861 
May 20, 1861 










Whitcsville, Ind. 


















60th Tnrl. Mich. 
Batty. 


















Warde, William I. _ 








LaFayette, Ind. 














White, Elijah ... 












White, George W. . ... 












White, William P. . . 








Wilson, David __ - 










Greencastle, Ind. 














Wright, William . .. 












Wuun, Smith B. 























46 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "I" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Voiunteer Infantry— Three Months' Service — Boone County 



NAME AXD RANK 



Capt. William C. Kise 

1st Lieut. Jehu TV. Perkins.. 

2d Lieut Reuben C. Kise 

1st Sergt. John TV. Dooley— 

2d Sergt. George Seott 

3d Sergt. Allen F. Coombs.. 

4th Sergt. Ira Alexander 

1st Corpl. George TV. Smith. 

2d Corpl. Felix Shumate 

3d Corpl. TVm. E. McAuley.. 
«h Cpl. TVm. II. Remington 
Musician Genio S. Lawrence. 
Musician Richard G. Dorinire 

Allison, Alfred T. 

Berry, Sylvester 

Besto, Michael 

Bosley, Martin V. __ _ 

Bragg, John M. 

Breedlove, TVm. T. 

Brown, William X. 

Campbell, Alex. S. 

Carten, Abram A. 

Coombs, John H 

Daughcrty, Austin 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1861 
April 23, 1S61 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 186] 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6. 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 0, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exn. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



TVounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Lt. Col. 3 yrs 10th 

I 3, years 10th 

F. & S., 3 years 

10th 

F. 40th Ind. 1st 

Lieut. 

I, 3 yrs. 10th 

B 154 Ind. 



86th Ind., Co. A 
I, 3 years 10th 



G 116th Ind. 
I, 3 years 10th 
I, 3 years 10th 
I, 3 years 10th 



Fife Maj. 40 Ind 
I, 3 years 10th 



F, 40th Ind. 
I, 3 years 10th 

3Sth 111. 
A, 3 years 10th 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 11 days 
3m 14 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



3y 2m 12d 



4 months 



months 



7m 9 days 



3y 11m ISd 



3y 4m 6 1 



Total 
Service 



3m 
3m 
3m 
3y 
3m 
7m 
3m 
8m 
3m 
3m 
10m 
3m 
3m 
3m 
3m 
4y 
3m 
3m 
3m 
3m 
3y 



17 days 
17 days 
17 days 
5m 26d 
14 days 
14 days 
14 days 
14 days 
14 days 
14 days 
23 days 
14 days 
14 days 
14 days 
14 days 
2m 2d 
14 days 
14 days 
14 days 
14 flays 
7m 20d 
14 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



3m 14 days 



See Field and Staff, 3 years 10th. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. 

See Field and Staff, 3 years 10th 

Mustered Out 40th Ind. Feb. 10, 1864. Dead. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. 

Mustered Out 154th Aug. 6, 1865. Lebanon, Ind. 

Cason, Boone Co., Ind. 

Killed at Stone River, Tenn., Jan. 1, 1863. 

See I, 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Mustered Out 2d Lieut. 116th Mar. 1, 1864. 

Dead. 
I, 3 years 10th. 

See 1, 3 years 10th. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Mustered Out 40th Ind. Dec. 31, 1S64. Dead. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. Dead. 

Traders Point, Ind. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

Boone, Iowa. 

Resigned 2d Lieut. 40th Ind. April 24, 1S64. 

Eliznville, Ind. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

See Co. A. 3 years 10th. 






HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



47 



Muster Roll of Company"!" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Boone County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Davis, John C. 

Davis, Spier B. 

Dennis, Andrew 

Diekerson, Walter B. _ 

Diekerson, Alex. K. 

Dodson, John S. 

Endieott, Wm. C. 

Gladman, Archibald ._ 
Hancock, James H. ._ 
Hardin, Addison P. __ 
Hazelrigg, Geo. W. — 

Hoover, John 

Jugger, Joseph H. ___ 

James, David F. 

James, Alexander O. - 

Keese, Geo. W. 

Keath, TVm. R. 

Kise, Elisha K. 

Lawrence, John W. __ 

McCoy, Martin 

McQuitty, Van Buren. 

Mreshon, Eli E. 

Miller, Israel H. 

Nevels, Moses 



Entry into 
the Service 



Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr; 
Apr: 
Apr 
Apr 



1S61 
1851 
1861 
1881 
1881 
1861 
1861 
1881 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
18.81 



Discharge 
from the 

Service 



Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 0, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1801 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Altg. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause ol 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exd. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Sendee 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Sendee 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Servici 
Sendee 
Sendee 
Sendee 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Sendee 
Service 



Re Enlisted in 



F, 40th Ind.: Miss. 

Marine Brig. 

F, 3 years 10th 

I, 3 years 10th 

K, 3 years 10th 

F, 3 years 10th 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



F, 3 years 10th 



I, 3 years 10th 



3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 



Never Re-enlisted 



F, 3 years 10th 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



3y 9m lOd 



S6th Ind. 
Co. F 



2y 5m 29d 



Total 
Service 



4 yrs 24 days 



•2y 10m Yd 
3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



3:n 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
2y Dm 13d 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



:lin 11 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Discharged from 40th Ind. Aug. 28, 1865. 

Lebanon, Ind. 
Unknown. 

Died Camp Chase, Ohio, Mar. 4, 1865. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See Co. F, 3 years 10th. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. 

See Co. K, 3 years 10th. 

See Co. F, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Dead. 

See Co. F, 3 years loth. 

Coldwater, Branch Co., Mich. 

See Co. 1, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Terre Haute, Ind. 

Accidentally killed at Lebanon, Ky., Dec, 1861. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

Died Madison, Ind., Feb. 10, 1865. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See Co. F, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 



4S 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "I" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Boone County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Olive, David H. 

Owens, George 

Owens, George W. 

Owens, Wm. C. 

Parish, Francis M. 

Parish, John H. 

Pennington, Wm. H. 

Peunington, John W. 

Powell, Thomas J. 

Perkins, Ira S 

Price, Harvey C. 

Rayburn, Wm. J. 

Redding, James J. 

RoseK Nathan W. 

Riley, William W. 

Sanders, James W. 

Shumate, William 

Smith, Alexander F. 

Snedeker, William H. H.. 

Stephenson, Josiah 

Stephenson, Amos B. 

Taggart, John A. 

Tandy, William G. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Apr: 
Apr 
Apr: 
Apri 
Apr: 
Apr 
Apr 
Apri 
Apr 
Apri 
Apri 
ADri 



1 18, 1861 
1 23, 1861 
I 23, 1861 
1 23, 1861 
1 23, 1861 
1 23, 1861 
1 23, 1861 
1 23, 1861 
1 23, 1861 
1 23, 1861 
1 23, 1881 
1 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
Anril 23, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



July, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1S61 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Atlanta, Ga. 



I 55th In. 1. : 

G 116th Ind. 



Re-Enlisted in 



H 86th Ind.: 86th 
Ind. H. Lieut. 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



Unassigned recruit 



Co. F 86th Ind. 
Inf. 



3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 14 
3m 13 
3m 13 
3m 13 
3m 13 
3m 13 
3m 13 
3m 13 
3m 13 



days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 
days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
6m 21 days 10m 5 days 



8m 17 days 



3m 14 days 

3m 14 days 

1 year 



3m 13 days 

3m 13 days 

3m 13 days 

3m 13 days 



-I 3m 13 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Indianapolis, Ind. 
Cawker City, Colo. 
Boyleston, Ind. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. 

Mustered Out 116th Mar. 1, 1864. 

Lebanon, Ind. 
See N. C. Staff, 3 years 10th. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. 

Dead. 

Seward, Neb., Post 3. 

Unknown. 

Reeces Mills, Ind. 

Transferred to V. R. C. Dead. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

Unknown. 

See Co. I, 3 years 10th. 

Lebanon, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



49 



Muster Roll of Company "I" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Boone County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



Tuttle, Cleveland 

Watts, George H. 

Williamson, Robert A. 
Williams, Enoch M. _.. 
Wilson, Theodore A. _. 
Wilson, William J. — 

Witt, Silas M. 

Woods, James M. 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1881 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 
April 23, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 8, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 

Aug. 6, 1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Sendee 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Co. A 86th Ind. 
Inf. 



Co. F 40th lnd. 
Inf. 



Sgt. Co. G 116 Ind 
Co. H 135 Ind. 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 


3m 13 


days 


3m 13 


days 


3m IS 


days 


3m 13 


days 


3m 13 


days 


3m 13 


days 


3m 13 


days 


3m 13 


days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 







ly 


2m 


16d 


3y 


6m 


26d 


Urn 


12 


days 



Total 
Service 



3m 13 days 
3m 13 days 
ly 5m 29d 
3m 13 days 

3y 10m 9d 

yrs 13 days 

ly 2m 25d 

3m 13 days 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Unknown. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

Resigned as 1st Lieut. Co. A 86th Ind. ug. 19, 

1863. Lebanon, Ind. 
LTnknown. 

Resigned as 1st Lieut. 40th Ind. June 14, 1865. 

"Good of Service." 
Unknown. 

Mustered Out 116th Ind. Mar. 1, '64. Mustered 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Out 135th Ind. Sept. 29, '64. Pontiac, 111. 



Muster Roll of Company "K" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Marion County 



Capt. Charles C. Smith 

Capt. William H. Morgan.^ 
1st Lt. Richard T. Fahnestock 
2d Lieut. Benj. F. Beitzell___ 

1st Sergt. Joseph Patten 

2d Sergt. Alfred C. Fox 

3d Sergt. Wm. C. Shortridge 
4th Sergt. William Brown___ 
1st Corpl. Charles C. Wilson 
2d Corpl. Nathaniel Follett_- 

3d Corpl. James Orrick 

4th Cpl. Patrick H. Sheehan 
Musician Oscar H. Necly 



April 
June 
April 
May 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



June 24, 
Aug. 6, 
Aug. 6, 
Aug. 6, 
Aug. 6, 



Aug 
Aug 
Aug 
Aug 
Aug. 
Aug. 6 
Aug. 
Aug. 6 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 









Exp. 






Exp. 


Service 
Service 


Exd 


Exp. 






Exp. 


Service 


Exp. 


Sen 7 ice 


Exp. 


Service 


Exp. 


Service 


Exp 


Service 





Capt. U. S. A. 
Col. 25th Ind. 



Lieut. 57th Ind. 



19th U. S. Inity. 



2m 5 days 
Ira 13 days 
3m 18 days 
3m 1 day 
3m 15 days 
3m 15 days 
3m 15 days 
3m 15 days 
3m 15 days 
3m 15 days 
3m 15 days 
3m 15 days 
3m 15 days 



5y 5m 20d 



5y 9m 2d 



705 11th St., Washinton, D. C. Unknown. 

Dead. 

Lost on Str. "Sultana" April 27, 1865. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Dead 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

LaFayette, Ind. 

Present address Money Order Div., P. O. Dept., 
Washington, D. C. 



5o- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "K" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Marion County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 


Entry into 
the Service • 


Musician Hiram H. Hand___ 


April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 


22, 1861 
20, 1861 




20, 1861 




20, 1S61 




20, L861 


Beldon, Jason B. 


20, 1861 


Brooks, George W. 
Berquin, Joseph 
Cahil, Alartin 


20, 1S61 
20, 1861 
20, 1861 
20, 1861 




20, 1861 




20, 1861 


Clifton, Josian . _ 


20, 1S61 




20, 1861 




20, 1861 


Cunningham, Francis C. 


20, 1861 
20, 1861 




20, 1861 




20, 1861 




20, 1861 


Ely, TViUiam H. 


20, 1861 


Etherington, Leiris T. _ 
Fannestock, Edmund A.„ 
Fisher, Solomon ___ 


20, 1861 
20, 1861 
20, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug, 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 

■:< , isi;i 

20, 1S61 

20, 1861 

20, 1861 

20, 1861 

20, 1861 

20, 1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



20, 1861 

20, 1861 

20, 1891 

20, 1861 

20, 1861 

20, 1861 

20, 1861 

20, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 

6, 1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 



6, 1861 
6, 18(51 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp 
Exp, 
Exp, 
Exp 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 

St'l'ViCC 

Service 
Service 
Service 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 

Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Wouuded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



H, 3 yrs. loth 



H, 3 yrs. 10th 



G, 3 yrs. 10th 



liith U. S. Inf. 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3m 15 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 

11 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 

7 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 



In Other Or 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



3m 17 days 



3m 17 days 



3ra 17 days 
11 days 



7 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Promoted Q. M. Sergt. Dead. 

Unknown. 

See H, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See H, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

See G, 3 years 10th. 

Deserted May 1, 1861. Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

New Albany, Floyd Co., Ind. 

Danville, Vermillion Co., 111. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Post 262, Aledo, III. 

Died Clarksburg, a., July 1, 1861. 

See H, 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Donovan, 111. 

Deserted April 27, 1861. Unknown. 

Dead. 

Unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Si 



Muster Roll of Company "K" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Marion County (Continued) 





Entry into 
the Service 

April 20, 1881 
April 20, 1881 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, lsiil 
April 20, 1861 
July 1, 1881 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1881 
April 20, 18'il 
April 20, 1881 
Aprii 20, 1881 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1881 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1881 
April 20, ISfil 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1861 
April 20, 1881 


Discharge 
from the 

Service 


Cause of 
Discharge 


Wounded at 


Re-Enlisted in 


LENGTH OF SERVICE 




NAME AND RANK 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 




Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 
Aug. 8, 1861 
Aug. 6, 1861 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 






3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
lni 7 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 


































































































































Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 
Aug. 20, 1861 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exd. Service 






3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
























































Karen, William . . 




























































Lyons, William __ ... _ 










Unknown. 


Lewis, John B. 












MeDermott, Thos. _ 










Hugo, Elbert Co., Col. 



HISTORY 01' THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Muster Roll of Company "K" Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry — Three Months' Service — Marion County (Continued) 



NAME AND RANK 



McMahon, Dilts 

Meek, Samuel 

Minor, John B. 

Payne, Hiram B. 

Payne, William E. ___ 

Pings, Stephen 

Reagee, James C. 

Rowen, Eldridge C. — . 

Rugg, George H. 

Stephenson, James M. 
Stevenson, John F. __. 

Sweet, Franc:? M. 

Shoemaker, John 

Smith, Frederick 

Snyder, Henry 

Seott, Andrew J. 

Staley, James G. 

Sahm, Siegfried 

Thayer, Geo. W. 

Williams, Isaac H. ___ 

Woods, Riley 

Woods, Leroy 



Entry into 
the Service 



April 20, 
April 20, 
June 19, 



Apr 

Apri 
Apr 
Apri 
Apr 
Apri 
Apri 
Apri 
Apr; 
Apr: 
Apr 
Apr: 



1 20, 
1 20, 
1 20, 
1 20, 
1 20, 
1 20, 
1 20, 
1 20, 
I 20, 
1 20, 
1 20, 
1 20, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



1861 1 Aug. 



April 20, 
April 20, 
April 20, 
April 20, 
April 20, 
April 20, 
April 20. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 
Exp. 



Service . 
Service . 
Service . 

Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 
Service . 

Service . 

I 
Service]. 

Service!. 

Service L 



Wounded at 


Re-Enlisted in 


LENGTH OF SERVICE 


REMARKS AND P. O. 




In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


ADDRESS 






3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
lm 18 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 

3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 

3m 17 days 

3m 17 days 






Hugo, Elbert Co., Col. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

See 3 years 10th. 

See 3 years 10th. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Casnee, 111. 


























3 yrs. 10th, E. 
3 yrs. 10th, E. 














































Co. I2dN. T. Cav. 
Aug. 25, 1865 


-Tan. 25, 1885 




















Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Transitville, Ind. 

Monticello, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Cor. Yakima Ave. and 21 St. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 

Unknown. 




























































. Tacoma. Wash. 






3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 
3m 17 days 







































CHAPTER II 

1861 



THE reorganization of the Tenth Regiment Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry began in August, 1861, and rendezvous 
at Camp Tippecanoe, LaFayette, Indiana. Nine com- 
panies were already in camp and on September 6, 1861, the 
last company arrived in camp about 4 o'clock P. M., and after- 
ward, known as Company D. 

The regiment was recruited in the old Eighth Congres- 
sional District and the counties comprising this district were 
as follows: Benton, one company; Boone, three companies; 
Clinton, two companies; Fountain, one company; Montgomery, 
one company ; Tippecanoe, two companies. 

The Benton County Company (D) was raised in 
Benton, Tippecanoe and Warren, but the credit was given 
to Benton. The regiment was supplied with the old fashioned 
"wedge tents," which held about six men ; they were close and 
uncomfortable. "Camp Tippecanoe" was located about one 
and a half miles south of LaFayette near the old Railroad 
Junction of the LaFayette and Indianapolis, Wabash and New 
Albany and Salem Railroads. The location of the camp was 
good, being on a high hill with plenty of shade and water. 

The time of the men was principally employed in learning 
how to cook, and "squad drill." The old muskets furnished 
us at that time had neither "lock stock or barrel" and about 
the only thing dangerous about them was the "bayonet," which 
some fool was liable to use accidentally or otherwise. 



The disposition of the men to break guard was the rule 
and not the exception. The "guard house" was a frame con- 
struction, made of 4x4 uprights boarded up with plank. It 
was a frail institution, and carried no terrors to those who 
were "fortunate" enough to become an inmate. 

General J. J. Reynolds at this time was in western Vir- 
ginia and a grape vine report was that he was surrounded 
(Sept. 16th). His brothers, John L, James M., Edward H, 
and William F., residing in the city, hurried out to camp, very 
excited and urged Colonel Manson to hurry to his relief. Man- 
son finally received orders to report to Indianapolis for "muster 
in," and get ready for the front. Everything was hurley bur- 
ley. Relatives and friends swarmed the camp to bid the boys 
good-bye. The usual scenes were witnessed ; wives, mothers, 
sisters and sweethearts wept and moaned, and for awhile it 
looked as though the regiment would not get out of camp. To- 
ward evening Colonel Manson ordered the guard doubled, and 
not a man be allowed to leave camp under any circumstances. 
There were already some 30 or 40 in the guard house and they 
were ordered kept there until morning, when the regiment 
would leave on the early train for Indianapolis. The boys were 
restless and wanted to "go to town" once more, but no, they 
must stay there. The old saw, "Where -there's a will there's 
a way," held good in this case and the prisoners held a "coun- 
cil of war," selected a leader and "planned a campaign." The 



5-1 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



leader ordered them in lineup on the front and ends of the 
guard house. They stooped down, secured a good hold with 
their fingers under the lower edge of the structure, and every- 
thing in readiness the "general" gave orders to "Hee-o'-Hee," 
and in one minute the guard house was lying in the bottom of 
the ravine, on the west end of camp, and the men scattered in 
the brush and woods "streaking" it for town. The guards 
rallied, halted the men and threatened to "shoot." The rest 
of the boys in camp concluded they would go too, so they 
formed in solid column, charged the guard line and took ttie 
guards with them, guns and all. Nearly all the officers were 
down town, and when Manson heard of the stampede he gal- 
loped out to camp, organized a patrol of what was left and 
started for the city to round up the "deserters." By three 
o'clock in the morning about all of the command was again in 
camp. Reveille sounded, roll call was had, and the men ordered 
to get breakfast and be ready to march. 

September 17th, at 8 o'clock A. M., the regiment marched 
to the Junction, boarded the cars and was soon on our way to 



the capital. We arrived at Indianapolis about 2 o'clock in the 
afternoon of the same day, went into camp on West Washing- 
ton street, which was afterward known as "Camp Bill Tay- 
lor," named in honor of William Taylor, of LaFayette, who 
was formerly captain of Co. E in the three months service. 

The "Bell Tent" was issued to us and we immediately pro- 
ceeded to organize "messes" and settle down to business. These 
tents would hold twelve men and each one was privileged to 
select their own messmates. 

September 18th and 19th, 1861. We "fell in" for muster 
into the United States service by Major General Thomas J. 
Wood. Removing our hats, holding up our right hands, "we 
solemnly swore that we would support the Constitution of the 
United States, that we would defend our country against all 
its enemies, foreign and domestic, that we would obey the 
orders of our superior officers and strictly and promptly per- 
form all duties assigned us. So help us God." 

The following is the muster rolls of the three years or- 
ganization : 




MAJ. GEN. GEORGE H. THOMAS 
Our First Brigade Commander 



Field and Staff 



Original Muster 


8 




Additions during three years - 


12 






— 


20 


LOSSES 






Killed - 


1 




Promoted - 


3 




Resigned - - - - - 


9 


13 


Mustered out Sept. 19, 1864 - 




7 


Died since the war 


16 




Living - - - - - 


2 





Non -Commissioned Staff 



Original muster - 


6 




Additions 


6 






— 


12 


LOSSES 






Promoted - - - 


2 




Died 


1 




Discharged 


3 


6 


'Mustered out Sept. 19, 1864 




6 


Died since the war - 


S 




'Living - - - - - 


4 




L T nknown 


1 





" - : . 



Field and Staff 



WIW: Mzm, 



! 




LIEUT. COL. WILLIAM C. KISB 






COLONEL MAHLON D. MANSON 



ADJUTANT REUBEN C. KISE 



5S 



HISTORY 01? THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



FIELD AND STAFF— Three Years Service 



NAME AXD RANK 



Col. Mahlon D. Manson.. 
Lt. Col. Win. C. Kise 

Maj. Abram 0. Miller 

Adjt. Reuben C. Kise 



Q. M. David N. Steele 

Chap. George T. Daugherty 
Surg. Joseph S. Allen 



Sept. 18, 1861 



Ast. Srg. Conrad S. Perkins jSept. 18, 1861 



Entry into 
the Service 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. IS, 1861 

Sept. 18, 1861 

Sept. 18, 1861 



Mar. 24, 1862 
Nov. 18, 1862 

Aug. 23, 1862 

June 21, 1S62 



Sept. 18, 1861 June 15, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1861, April, 1863 



A. Srg. Robt. A. Williamson 
Ast. Surg. Increase J. Avery 
Art. Surg. Wm. H. Martin- 



Mar. 4, 1S62 
April 24, 1882 
April 24, 1882 



Oct. 3, 1S62 
Feb. 27, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1834 
Jan. 22, 1863 
May 20, 1863 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Promotion 
Disability 

Promotion 

Promotion 



Resignation 
Resignation 
Resignation 
Resignation 
Exp. Service 
Resignation 
Resignation 



Wounded at 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



Re Enlisted in 



Selma, Ala., April 



Col. 116th Ind. 



Col. 72d Ind. Aug. 



24, 1862 



Major 120th Ind. 
Mar. 1, 1S64 



6m 6 days 
1 year 2m 

ly 2m 17d 

1 year 20d 



1 year 3d 
7 months 
1 year 15d 
5m 9 days 
2y 6m lad 
9 months 
1 year 26:1 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



2y 8m 27d 
7 months 

2y 10m 3d 

4 years 3m 



Total 
Service 



2y 10m 3d 
1 year 9m 

1 years 20d 

5y 3m 20d 



1 year 8m 
7 months 
1 years 15d 
5m 9 days 
2y 8m 15d 
9 months 
1 year 26d 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Promoted Brig. Gen. Mar. 24, 1862. Resigned 

Dec. 21, '61. Mexican Vet. Died Feb. 4, 1895. 
Promoted Col. Apr. 5, '62. Resigned from 10th 

Nov. 18, '62. M. 0. 116th. Mexican Vet. 

Died Lebanon Sent. 10, 1884. 
Promoted Lt. Col. ADr. 5, '62. Brevetted Brig. 

Gen. Mar. 13, '65. M. 0. June 26, '65. Died 

April 24 1901. 
Promoted A. A. G. June 21, 1862. Resigned 

A. A. G. Mar. 16, '64. Promoted Maj. 120th 

Ind. Mar. 1, '64. Promoted Lt. Col. 120th 

Ind. Aug. 17, '64. Promoted Col. 120th Ind. 

Sept. 1, '6.3: Brevetted Brig. Gen. Mar. 13, '65. 

M. O. 1866. Dead. 
Resigned June 15, 1862. Died Feb. 28, 1906. 

Resigned April 19, 1862. Dead. 

Resigned Oct. 3, 1862. Dead. 

Resigned Feb. 27, 1862. Dead. 

Promoted Surgeon May 21, 1863. Dead. 

Promoted Surgeon Oct. 8, 1862. Dead. 

Promoted Surgeon Jan. 23, 1863. Dead. 













f\ 


on-Commission 


ed Staff- 


-Three Years Service. 






Sgt. Maj. John D. Simpson. 


Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 

April 


18, 

18, 

IS, 
18, 

18, 

18, 
18, 

1, 


1831 

1861 
1861 
1861 

1861 

1861 
1861 

1862 


Dec. 19, 1864 
Sept. 20, 1864 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 




Major 154th Ind. 


3 years 3m 

3 years 2d 
6m 2 days 
ly 5m 7d 

ly 8m 20d 

5m 7 days 


6m 8 days 


3y 9m 8d 

3 years 2d 
6m 2 days 
ly 5m 7d 

ly Sm 20d 

5m 7 days 


Captured Chickamauga, Ga., SeDt. 19, 1863. 


Q. M. S. Chas. F. Wilstaeh.. 




Promoted Lieut. Co. H. Com. Maj. 154 Ind. 
April 27, 1865. Dead. 
Promoted Quartermaster June 16, 1S62. Dead. 


Com. Sgt. David B. Hart- 










Fife Maj. Daniel Conklin 


Feb. 2-5, 1863 
Feb. 25, 1863 
Feb. 25, 1862 


G.O.War Dep 
M. 0. Chief 
Mus'n & Bnd 
G.O.War Dep 
M. 0. Chief 
Mus'n & Bnd 
Disability 






Service. Died at Nashville Tenn., Mar. 20, '62. 
Died May 12, 1S96. 


Drum Maj. Jas. S. Conklin. 








See Co. H, 3 months 10th. Dead. 


Hos. Std. Leonard H. Miller 








Dead. 


Bugler Oliver S. Rankin 








Served as a Scout. Was last seen at Chicka- 


Fife 31aj. William F. Cobb.. 


Sept. 19, 1864 








2y 6m 18d 




2y 6m 18d 


mauga Sept. 19, '63, as a Rebel officer on 
Hardee's staff. Was a Union spy. Dead. 
Care Insane Hospital, Indianapolis, Ind. 



COMPANY A 



Company A was recruited and organized at Lebanon, 
Boone County, Indiana, during the month of August, 1861, by 
James H. Hamilton and Thomas A. Cobb. 

When the company had 
been recruited to 64 men 
they went to Indianapolis, but 
subsequently reported to 
"Camp Tippecanoe," at La- 
Fayette, going into camp on 
August 28, 1861. An elec- 
tion of officers was held which 
resulted as follows : 

Capt, Jas. H. Hamilton 
1st Lieut. Thos. A. Cobb 
2nd Lieut. C. P. Rodman 
1st Sergt. Martin T. Jones 
These officers were com- 
missioned by Governor Mot- 
captain thomas l cobb t011] September 2, 1861. 
September 18, 1861, the company was mustered into the 
United States service with 101 men. Recruits received during 
the service 9, making a total of 110 men in the company dur- 
ing the three years. 

The company sustained during its service the following 
losses : 




Resigned 2 

Killed in Action 5 

Died of Wounds -I 

Promoted 1 

Discharged on Account of Disability. ... 16 

Died 10 

Deserted 2 

Transferred to Miss. Marine Brigade. ... 2 

Transferred to V. R. C 3 

Transferred to 58th Indiana Infantry. . . .23 
Mustered out Sept. 19, 1864 45 

Total no 

The transfer to the 58th Indiana consisted of 17 veterans 
and 6 recruits, making a total of 23. 

This company was composed of first-class soldiers, they 
were always ready for duty and in camp kept "things lively." 
Uriah Starbuck was captured at Chickamauga and after months 
of starvation was exchanged, but died from the effects thereof 
at Annapolis, Maryland. 

Died since the war 51 

Living 36 

Unknown 3 

For further information see Muster Roll. 



6o 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY A 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Capt. James H. Hamilton.- Sept. 2, 1861 
1st. Lieut. Thomas A. Cobb Sept. 2, 1S61 
2d Lt. Carson P. Rodman— Sept. 2, 1861 
1st Sergt. llartin T. Jones— l Sept. IS, 1861 



2d Sergt. William S. Cresap-I Sept. 18, 1861 Nov. 3, 1863 Resignation 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Nov. IS, 1S62 
Sept. 19, 1861 
April 1, 1S62 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Resignation 



Sd Sergt. Abner W. Smith — 
±rh Sergt. Willi am M. Ross— 
5th Sgt. Moses A. Daugherty 
1st Corpl. Daniel Abernetby 
2d CorpL Josiah Beaman— 
3d Corpl. Daniel O. C. NeaL 
4th Corpl. James A. Weed- 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



5th Corpl. Oliver P. Bouldin Sept. 

6th Corpl. James 31. Watts. Sept. 
7th Corpl. William H. Wiley Sept. 
6th Corpl. Menitt S. Mason Sept. 

Drummer Jacob S. Cobb Sept. 

Pifer Hiram Baker "ipt. 

Wagoner Wm. R. SimpMns— Sept. 

Anderson, Joseph W. Sept. 

Bennett, William Sept. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 

1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Sept. 
July 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



1864 
1862 
1864 
1864 
1861 



Sept. 5, 1864 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



1864 
1864 
1864 



Sept. 
Oct. 



1864 

1862 



Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Transfer 

Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Disability 



Wounded at 



Chickainauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Injured at Chicka- 
mauga by Artil'y 



Re Enlisted in 



Adjt. S6th Ind. 
Aug. IS, 1862 



Ast. Srg. 135 Ind. 

May 24, 1S64 
Ast. Srg. 154 Ind. 

April IV, 1865 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



ly 2m 16d 
3 yrs 17 day! 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



2 yrs. 1 day 



2y lm 16d 



6m 13 days 



3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 15 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

5m 11 days 

5m 23 days 

2y 11m 14d j 10m 20 days 

3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
7m 12 days 
3 years Id 
1 years 24d 
4m 1 day 



Total 
Service 



ly 2m 16d 
3 years 17d 



2 years Id 
2y 7m 29d 

3 years Id 
9m 15 days 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
5m 11 days 
5m 23 days 
3y 10m 4d 

3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
7m 12 days 
3 years Id 
1 year 24d 
4m 1 day 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Dead. 

Promoted Captain Nov. IS, 1862. Lebanon, Ind. 

Promoted Cant. Co. H 86 Ind. Jan. 23, '63. 

Resigned Apr. 1, 1862. Lebanon, Ind. 
Promoted 2d Lieut. Apr. 2, '62. Promoted 1st 

Lieut. Nov. IS, '62. Killed at Chiekamauga, 

Ga., Sept. 19, '63. 
Promoted Chaplain Oct. 26, '62. M. O. 135th 

Ind. Sept. 24, '64. M. O. 154th Ind. Aug. 4, 

'65. Dead. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. Nov. 18, '62. Promoted 

1st Lieut. Sept. 20, '63. Dead. 
Westfleld, Ind. 

Promoted 1st Sergeant. 151S Barth Ave. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
M. 0. as Sergeant. Lebanon, Ind. 

M. 0. as Sergeant. Died 1896. 

Died at Somerset, Ky., Mar. 1, 1862. 

Died at Lebanon, Ky., Mar. 12, 1862. 

Veteran. Transferred to 58th Ind. Promoted 
2d Lieut. A 5Sth Ind. M. 0. 58th, July 25, 
1865. Close of war. Pratt, Kans. 

Died Dee. 9, 190S. 

Promoted Sergeant. Died Sept. 15, 1911. 

Died Dec. S, 1910. 

Appointed Chief Musician. Lebanon, Ind. 

Deserted April 30, 1863. Dead. 

Dead. 

Atwood, Kans. 

Killed at Mill Springs, Ky., Jan. ID, 1862. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



61 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY A 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Berryhill, William ___ 
Berryhill, Mathew A. 

Berry, Henry 

Buffinger, William H 

Bullock, Edward 

Burch, Frank 

Burns, Robt. E. 

Burgess, Andrew J. - 
Campbell, James W. 
Campbell, John A. __ 
Chavers, John A. _._ 

Cavin, Elijah 

Cooley, Wm. F. 

Davidson, Wm. H. __ 
Daugherty, Wm. W. 
Edwards, James L. . 

Etenburn, Henry 

Francis, John W. ___ 

Fox, James A. 

Gray, Albert M. 

Hammond, Wm. H. 

Hardesty, Jesse 

Hardesty, Urias 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept. 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept. 
Sept. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1851 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1801 



1864 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 
from the 
' Service 



April 1, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. .5, 1864 

Sept. 5, 1864 
April 30, 1 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Oct. 15, 1862 
Feb. 3, 1863 
Sept. 5, 18S4 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sert. 19, 1884 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 

Transfer 

Disability 

Transfer 

Disability 

Transfer 

Transfer 

Exp. Service 

Transfer 

Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Re Enlisted in 



Sergt. H 11th Ind. 

Cav., Dec. 24, '63 

1st Lt. F 150 Ind. 

Mar. 2, 1865 



Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 

1S64 
Injured at Chicka- 
mauga by Artil'y 



Chickamauga. Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



6m 13 days 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
2y 11m 14d 
2y 11m 14d 
2y 11m lid 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
2y 11m ltd 

Grn 24 days 
7m 12 days 
2y 11m 14d 
1 year 27d 
ly 4m 15d 
2y 11m 14d 
3 years Id 
1 yr. 17 days 
3 years Id 
5m 2 days 
3 years Id 
2y 11m 14d 



ly 8m 26d 

5m 9 days 



Total 
Service 



10m 20 days 
8m 21 days 
10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 
10m 5 days 



10m 


20 


days 




10m 


20 


days 


10m 


20 


days 






10m 


20 


days 



2y 3m 9d 
3y 5m lOd 
3 years Id 
3y 10m 4d 
3y 7m 5d 
3y 10m 4d 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3y 10m 4d 

ly 3m 29d 
7m 12 days 
3y 10m 4d 
1 year 27d 
ly 4m 15d 
3y 10m 4d 
3 years Id 
ly lm 7d 
3 years Id 
5m 2 days 
3 years Id 
3y 10m 4d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



M. O. 11th Ind. Oav. Sept. 19, 1865. Dead. 

Pi-omoted Capt. F 150th Ind. June 25, 1865. 
M. O. 150th Aug. 11, '65. Ardmore, Ind. Tor. 
Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1865. Franklin, O. 
Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. 0. 

58th May 26, 1865. Dead. 
Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1865. Mulvane, Kans. 
Lebanon, Ind. 

Kirklin, Ind. 

Died Dec. 10, 1908. 

Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, '65. Close of war. R. R. 12, 

Lebanon, Ind. 
Recruit. Transferred to 5Sth Ind. M. O. 58th 

July 10, 1865. Close of war. Dead. 
Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 
58th July 2.5, '65. Close of war. Frankfort, Ind. 
Died July 28, 1909. 

Transferred to Mississippi Marine Brigade. 

De Witt, Arkansas Co., Ark. 
Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, '65. Close of war. St. Anne, III. 
Alvin, 111. 

Recruit. Transferred to A 5Sth Ind. M. O. 

5Sth July 25. '65. Close of war. Dead. 
LaFayette, Ind. 

Died at Lebanon, Ky„ Feb. 20, 1862. 

Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred to 58th Ind. M. O. July 
25, '65. Close of war. Tulsa, Okla. 



62 



HISTORY OP THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY A 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Hardesty, John Sept. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Harris, Pierson D. 
Herrin. Benjamin . 

Hixon, Alkana 

Holloway, -John 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Kokendolfer, David Sept. 



Kimble, Isaac 

Kineaid, Jno. C. — 

Lane, Henry S. 

Lewis, Leonidas A. . 

Love, Philip 

Lindsey, Eollin 

Lynch, Ira A. 

Mannus, Chas. W. . 

Mace, Jesse 

McCoy, James M. ... 
McConaha, Wm. F. . 
McColm, William ... 
McDonald, James ... 
McKinzie, John W. . 
McKinzie, Joseph ... 
McKinzie, Samuel M. 

Mills, John 

Mills, Francis M. _._ 



Sept. 

Dee. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



IS, 1S61 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
1, 1861 
4, 1862 
18, 1862 
7, 1863 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1S61 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 

July 10, 
Sept. 19, 
Feb. 7, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1884 
1862 
1S62 
1864 
1863 
1S64 



Mar. 30, 
Feb. 6, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 5, 
June 23, 
Sept. 5, 



1864 
1864 
1862 
1864 



Sept. 5, 
Dec. 15, 
April 30, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 



18S4 
1863 
1862 
1864 
1864 



Jan. 14, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 



Transfer 
Disability 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Wounds 
1 -ansfer 



Wounded at. 



Chickamauga, Ga. 

Sept. 19, 1863 
Mill Springs, Ky., 

Jan. 19, 1862 



Re Enlisted in 



Transfer 
Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Chickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



2y 11m ltd 
3 years Id 



Chickamauga, Ga. 

Sept. 19, 18(i3 



9m 22 days 
3 years Id 
ly 4m 17d 
3 years Id 
4m 25 days 
1 year 26d 
1 year 18d 
1 year 28d 
2y 11m 14d 
9m 5 days 
2y llm 14d 
4m 28 days 
ly lm 18d 
2y llm 14d 
2y 2m 27d 
7m 12 days 
3 years Id 
2y llm 4d 
. 2 years 7d 
2y 8m 26d 
3 years Id 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



10m £0 days 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



9m IS days 



9m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



3y 10m 4d 
3 years Id 



10m 20 days 



9m 22 days 
3 years Id 
ly 4m 17d 
3 years Id 
4m 25 days 
1 year 26d 

1 year 18d 
ly llm 18d 
3y 10m 4d 
9m 5 days 

3y 9m Id 
4m 28 days 
ly lm 183 

3y 9m 4d 
2y 2m 27d 
7m 12 days 
3 years Id 
3y 10m 4d 

2 years 7d 



3 years Id 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 58th 

July 25, 1865. Close of war. Unknown. 
Died Jan. 26, 1910. 

Taken prisoner, 1862. Died Huntsville, Ala., '62. 

Died Sept. 25, 1894. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Accidentally killed Sept. 8, 1882. 

Died at Columbia, Tenn., April 24, 1862. 

Transferred Miss. Marine Brigade Mar. 30, '63. 

Recruit. Dead. 
Died at Dayton, 0., May, 1878. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. M. O. 58th 
July 25, 1S65. Brightwood, Marion Co., Ind. 

Veteran. Transferred to A 5Sth Ind. M. O. 
58th July 25, 1S65. Stockwell, Ind. 

Richland Center, Wis. 

Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th June 22, 1865. Dead. 

Died at Mill Springs, Ky., Feb. 15, 1862. 

Died at Bowling Green, Ky., Nov. 5, 1882. 

Veteran. Transferred to A 5Sth Ind. M. O. 

58th June 25, 1865. Died Jan. 3, 1910. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

Galena, Kans. 

Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

5Sth July 25, 1865. Harper, Kans. 
Killed at Chattanooga, Tenn., Sept. 25, 1S63. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. Dead. 

R. R. 9, Lebanon, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



63 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY A 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Moore, Daniel G. Sept. 18, 



Moore, Isaac N. 

Moore, "William W. - 

Moore, John 

Mort, William W. — 

Myres, Benj. F. 

Neales, James B. 

Norris, Ghas. W. 

Oliver, "William 

Osborne, John "W. 0. 

Payne, John F. 

Perkins, James G. __ 
Perkins, William H. . 

Perkins, John H. 

Place, Jonathan 

Record, William 

Reynolds, Edward _.. 
Rodgers, Joseph S. -. 

Rose, Landel 

Rose, Stephen S. 

Ross, John M. 

Sample, Andrewville . 



Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Aug. 13, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18. 
Sept. 18, 
Sent. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 
Feb. 26, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 
1861 
1E61 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Oct. 

Sept. 

April 

Sept. 

Sept. 

July 



12, 1862 
IE), 1864 
6, 1864 
5, 1864 

19, 1864 

20, 1862 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



19, 1804 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 

5, 1864 



Sept. 
Sept. 



5, 1864 
5, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Disability 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Transfer 
Transfer 



Wounded at 



Chiekamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Perry ville, Kv., 
Oct. 8, 1862 



Kenesaw, Ga., 
June 27, 1885 



Atlanta, Ga., 
Aug. 2, 1804 



Chiekamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Chiekamauga, Ga 
Sept. 20, 1863 



Re Enlisted in 



Chiekamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1803 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



ly lm 24d 
3 years Id 
2y 6m 19d 

2 years 23d 

3 years Id 
10m 2 days 
5m. 18 days 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
2y 11m 4d 
2 years 2d 
2y 11m 4d 
6m 10 days 

4 days 
2y 5m 15d 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Sm 29 days 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



ly lm 24d 
3 years Id 
2y 6m 19d 
2y lm 22d 
3 years Id 
10m 2 days 
5m IS days 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3y 10m 4d 
2 years 2d 
3y 10m 4d 
1 year 5m 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



2y 5m 15d 



Ellensburg, Wash. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

Cherry, Vale Co., Kans. 
Recruit. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th June 4, 1865. Dead.. 
Unknown. 

Dead. 

Died at Lebanon, Ky., Mar. 6, 1862. 

Appointed Corporal. Died July 25, 1894. 

Dead. 

Lehigh, Mo. 

Nat'! Mil. Home, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Dead. 

Died Oct. 25, 1S97. 

Died June 28, 1898. 

Sidney, III. 



Veteran. Transferred to 58th Ind. Promoted 
Adit 58th Ind. M. O. 58th July 25, '65. Dead. 
Killed at Chiekamauga Sept. 20, 1863. 

Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, '65. Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Recruit. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1865. Franklin, Ind. 
Left at Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. 22, 1861. 

Reported as a Deserter. Unknown. 
Wounded second time at Chattanooga, Tenn., 

by a stack of guns in 40tli Ind. falling and 

one of guns being discharged, ball entering 

shoulder. Died at Nashville, Tenn., Mar. 3, 

1S64, from wounds. 



04 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY A 



Boone County 



XAXIE AXD RANK 



Sherman, Erastus ^_. 
Shephard, Francis M. 
Shephard, Jasper N. . 

Shultz. William H. 

Singleton, James 

Singleton, John 

Sloan, John 

Spencer, Henry L. __ 
Starbuek, Uriah 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 

, Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 

j Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 

I Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. IS, 1861 



Starbuck, Isaac __ 
Stroud, Albert ._ 

Stroud, Eiley 

Swope, Jonathan 
Tipton, James H. 
Van Cleve, John _ 
Warren, Jeremiah 
Wills, Archibald „ 
Wright, Benj. P. . 
Zwyers, Thomas . 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Dec. 15, 1863 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 

Sept. 19, 1S64 
Sept. 19, 1S64 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 



July 
Sept. 
May 
April 



6, 1864 
19, 1864 

5, 1862 

6, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Disability 

Transfer 

Transfer 

Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 



Wounds 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Transfer 



Wounded at 



Chiekarnauga, Ga. 

Sept. 19, 1863 
Mill Springs, Ky., 

Jan. 19, 1862 



Cliiekamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Re-Enlisted in 



K 147th Ind., Mar. 
8, 1865 



Co. B 154th Ind. 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 


2j 


2m 


27d 


25 


11m 


4d 


2y 


11m 


4d 


3 


years 


Id 


3 


years 


Id 


zy 


3m 


14 d 


3 


years 


Id 


3 


years 


Id 


35 


5m 


29d 


3 


years 


Id 


3 


years 


Id 


3 


years 


Id 


3 


years 


Id 


3 


years 


Id 


5 


years 


Id 


'•Y 


9m 


18d 


3 




Id 


7m 17 rl 




2y 


6m 


19d 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



4m 23 days 
10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



2y 7m 20d 
3y 10m 4d 



10m 20 days 3y 10m 4d 

3 years Id 

3 years Id 

2y 3m 14d 

; 3 years Id 

3 years Id 
3y 5m 29d 



3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3 years Id 
3y 4m Id 

2 years Id 
2y 9m lSd 

3 years Id 
7m 17 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



M. O. 147th Ind. Aug. 4, 1865. Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred to A 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1665. Dead. 
Veteran. Appointed Corporal. Transferred to 

A 58th Ind. M. O. 58th Ind. July 25, 1865. 

Oeting, Pierce Co., Wash. 
Appointed Corporal. Died May 6, 1909. 

Dead. 

Died in Boone Co., Ind., Jan. 1, 1864. 

Hennesey, Kingfisher Co., Okla. 

Appointed Corporal. Sheridan, Ind. 

Captured at Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 19, 1863. 
Sent to Andersonville, Ga., and died from ef- 
fects of starvation at Annapolis, Md., Mar. 
17, 1865, after release. 

Unknown. 

Cairo, 111. 

Dead. 

Appointed Corporal. Died Jan. 20, 1912. 

Sergt. Co. B 154. Died Sept. S, 1910. 

Appointed Corporal. Killed at Chickamauga, 

Ga., Sent. 19, 1863. 
Died Peb. 9, 1909. 

Thorntown, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps April 6, 
1864. Dead. 



COMPANY B 



This company was recruited at Crawfordsville, Montgom- 
ery County, Indiana, during the month of August, i86r, by 
James H. Vanarsdall and Franklin Goben. Upon completion of 
the organization the following officers were elected : 

Captain, James H. Vanarsdall 

First Lieutenant, Franklin Goben 

Second Lieutenant, William Colwell 

First Sergeant, Isaac H. Miller 
It reported at "Camp Tippecanoe," September 2, 1861, and 
was mustered into the United States service, September 18, 
1861, with 101 men. It received during its term of service 
20 recruits, was always with the regiment and sustained its 
quota of losses in all the battles in which the regiment was en- 
gaged. During its term of service its losses were as follows: 



Resigned 2 

Died from disease 9 

Discharged on account of disability 30 

Died from wounds 6 

Killed in action 7 

Promoted 1 

Transferred to Miss. Marine Brigade. ... 1 

Transferred to V. R. C 2 

Transferred to U. S. Cavalry 1 

Transferred to U. S. Signal Corps 1 

Transferred to 58th Indiana Infantry. .. 12 
Mustered out September 19, 1864 48 

Total 121 

Deaths since the war, 49 ; living at present time. 43 
For further information see Muster Roll. 



66 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY B 



Montgomery County 



NAME AND RANK 



Capt. James H. VanarsdalL. 
1st Lieut. Franklin Goben.._ 
2d Lieut. William CohveiL— 

1st Sergt. Isaac F. Miller 

2d Sergt. David C. Eicher 

3d Sergt. John W. Hogsett.. 
4th Sergt. William J. Cason 
5th Sergt. Thos. N. Hartness 

1st Corpl. Elihu Nicholson 

2d Corpl. Robt. P. Snyder__ 

3d Corpl. Albert Burdett 

4th Corpl. Wm. S. Duncan.. 

5th Corpl. Jacob Swank 

6th Corpl. Lewis W. Hanee.. 
7th Corpl. George W. Stover 

8th Corpl. Joel Manka 

Drummer James M. Robbins 

Filer John H. Scott 

Wagoner John Duncan 

Applegate, John E. 

Applegate, Geo. W. 

Eabb, Benj. M. 

Beach, Wm. H. 

Bradford, Geo. W 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sent 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 



2, 1861 
2, 1861 
2, 1861 
20, 1861 
18, 1S61 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



June 7, 
Aug. 9, 
Sept. 19, 



1862 
1864 
1864 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Feb. 9, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 



1864 
1864 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 



June 18, 
Sept. 19, 



1862 
1864 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Mar. 28, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 

1864 
1862 
1864 
1864 



Feb. 9, 
Mar. 28, 



1863 
1862 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Resignation 
Resignation 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Disability 
Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Chickamauga 



Mill Springs Jan 
19, 1862 



Re-Enlisted in 



Mill Springs Jan. 
19, 1862 



Kenesaw Mtn., 
Ga., June 25, '64 



Perrvville, Ky., 
Oct. 8, 1862 



Hancock's 
Veteran Corps 



1st Lieut. Co. D. 
150th Ind. Inf. 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Transfer 
Disability 



Mil] Springs Jan 
19, 1862 



8m 5 days 

2y 11m 7d 
3 yrs 17 days 

9m 11 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 5m 21d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 17d 

2y 9m 7(1 

9 months 

3 yrs. 1 day 

1 yr 20 days 

1 yr 20 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

6m 10 days 
3 yrs 1 day 
3 yrs 1 day 

2 yrs 2 days 
ly 4m 21d 
6m 10 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



3m 11 days 



Total 
Service 



8m 5 days 

3y 2m 18d 

3 yrs 17 days 

9m 11 days 



Lgth. Service 3 yrs. 1 day 

unknown 
J 3 yrs. 1 day 



5m 4 days 



ly 5m 21d 

3y 4m 5d 

3 yrs. 1 day 



10m 20 days 3y 10m 7d 

2y 9m 7d 

j 9 months 



Lgth. Service 
unknown 



1 yr. 20 days 

1 yr. 20 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

6m 10 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2 yrs. 2 days 
ly 4m 21d 
6m 10 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Resigned June 7, 1882. Dead. 

Resigned Aug. 9, 1864. Promoted Captain 

June 8, 1862. Dead. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. June 8, 1882. Cant. Aug. 

10, 1864. M. O. as 1st Lieut. Dead. 
Promoted 2d Lieut. June 8, 1862. Died at 

Corinth, Miss., July 1, 1862. 
Dead. 

McCracken, Rush Co., Kans. 

Dead. 

Mustered Out Aug. 5, 1865. Dead. 

Died Sept. 16, 1908. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. July 1, '62. Promoted 1st 
Lieut. Aug. 10, '62. M. O. as 2d Lieut. Dead. 

Reduced to Ranks. Veteran. Transferred to B 
58th Ind. M. O. 58th July 25, '65. Afton, la. 

Veteran. Died of wounds at Kenesaw June 25, 
1864. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 



Appointed Sergeant. Dead. 

Killed at Perryville, Ky., Oct. S, 1862. 

Killed at Perryville, Ky., Oct. S, 1S62. 

340 N. Illinois St., Indianapolis. Ind. 

Died Feb., 1003. 

Dead. 

Veedersburg, Ind. 

Woodbury, Hancock Co., 111. 

Killed at Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 20, 1S63. 

Transferred to Miss. Marine Brigade. Died 

May 10. 1909. 
Maple Plain. Minn. 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



6 7 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY B 



Montgomery County 





Entry into 
the Service 


Discharge 

from the 
Service 


Cause of 
Discharge 


Wounded at 


Re Enlisted in 


LENGTH OF SERVICE 




&AME AND RANK 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 


Bratton, Chas. A. 


Sept. 18, 1861 

Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1661 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Dec. 2, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Jan. 8, 1864 
Sept. IS, 1861 
Dee. 2, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Dec. 2, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 


July 5, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
May 8, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 


Disability 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 




Co. B 154th Tnd. 

Inf. 


9m 17 days 
7m 28 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 11m I7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 2 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
4 months 
10m 1 day 
1 year 9m 
7m 8 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
9 months 
6m 17 days 
9m 5 days 
7m 8 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
9m 14 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 8 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
yrs. 1 day 
9m 2 days 


4m 7 days 
10m 20 days 

4m 11 days 
10m 20 days 


13m 24 days 
ly 8m 18d 
3y 4m 12d 
3y 10m 7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 2 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
4 months 
10m 1 day 

3 years 
7m 8 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
9 months 
6m 17 days 
9m 5 days 
7m 8 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
9m 14 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 5 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
9m 2 days 


Lebanon, Ind. 

Mustered Out 58th July 25, 1865. Dead. 




Mill Springs 


B 58th Ind. 

Mar. 14, 1865 


Mustered Out 58th July 25, 1865. Dead. 


Calfee, Albert W. _ _ - 




Childers, Wm, M. 






Mustered Out 58th July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Died Dec. 7, 1901. 










Dead. 












Cauk, Robt. F 








Fredonia, Wilson Co., Kans. 


Conner, James E. _ 









Killed at Mill Springs Jan. 19, 1862. 


Craig, Samuel M. _ __ __ 


July 5, 1862 
June IS, 1863 
July 10, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 
June IS, 1862 
July 25, 
June 23, 1862 
July 10, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 


Wounds 
Transfer 
Disability 
Exp. Service 

Disability 


Mill Springs, Ky., 
Jan. 19, 1S62 

Mill Springs. Ky., 
Jan. 19, 1862 




Dead. 


Grain, Zephana H. 

Crain, David B. _ 




1 year 3m 


Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps June, 

1863. M. O. Sent. 19, 1864. Dead. 
Died Dec. 14, 1911. 


Custer, "Wm. H. .. __ 








Darlington, Ind. 


Davis, Andrew P. 








Crawfordsville, Ind. 


Davis, Franklin W. _ 








Recruit. Died at Jeffersonville, Ind., July 25, '64. 


Day, William H. __ __ 


Disability 

Disability 
Exp. Service 








Veteran. New Market, Montgomery Co., Ind. 


Dorsey, George T. _ 








Dead. 


Edmonds, Wm. 








Dead. 


Elmore, Wesley C. 








Died at Corinth, Miss., July 5, 1862. 


Evans, John P. _ 


Sept. 19, 1864 
June 10, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 


Exp. Service 

Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 








Toledo, Iowa. 


Evans, Joseph M. 








Toledo, Iowa. 


Ferguson, Isaiah _ 


Mill Springs 
Mill Springs 






Dead. 


Ferguson, Jesse Jr. ___ _ 






Syracuse, Neb. 


Fields, Jasper M . 


June 20. 1862 






Dead. 



68 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY B 



Montgomery County 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Forgey, James S. __ 
Fulwider, Jacob S. - 
Fulwider, Samuel J. 
Goehring, William __ 
Hanee, John P. W. 
Haywood, John M. 

Harris, James H. 

Harris, William K. 
Higgins, William 0. 

Hunt, Thomas 

Hunt, Moses Wesley 

Inlow, Isaac 

Jay, Moses 

Jesse, Thomas J. ___ 
Johnson, John M. _ 
Jones, William C. __ 
Kelsey, Thomas J. _ 

Kelly, Lorenzo D. 

Landis, Thomas _._ 

Laurie, John 

Lewis, William H. _ 
Lewis, Benjamin E. 

Lynn, Daniel B. 

McDaniel, Joseph __ 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
April 22, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 1, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Oct. 22, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1863 
1861 
1S61 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 
Mar. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 



1861'Sept. 
1861 July 



1861 
1861 



Sept. 
Sept. 



18611 Sept. 



Sept 



19, 1S64 

7, 1862 

5, 1864 

26, 1863 

19, 1861 

19, 1864 

17, 1862 

19, 1864 

5, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 



Sept. 5, 1864 



1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 Sf 

1861 j Sept. 19, 18 

1861 Sept. 19, 

1863 

1861 
1861 
1861 
1802 
1861 
1861 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Exp. Service 
Disability 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 

Mill Springs 
Exp. Service | Mill Springs 
Exp. Service 



Peach Tree Creek, 
July 20, 1864 



Perryville, Ky., 
Oct. 8, 1862 



Mill Springs 



Mill Springs, Ky. 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3 yrs. 1 day 

5m 20 days 

ly 4m ltd 

ly 4m 8d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

8m 29 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2y llm 17d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 4 days 

2y llm 17d 

9m 1 day 

3 yrs. "1 day 

yrs. 1 day 

yrs. 1 day 

8m 9 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 9m 18d 

llm 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 

Service 



3 yrs. 1 day 
5m 20 days 
2y 3m 4d 
ly 4m 8d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 29 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 10m 7d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
9m 4 days 
3y 10m 7d 
9m 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 9 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 9m lSd 
llm 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Ottawa, Kans. 

R. R. 1, Lebanon, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to B 58tn Ind. M. O. 

July 25, 1S65. Whitestown, Ind. 
Transferred to 2d U. S. Cavalry. 

Monte Vista, Colo. 
Appointed Corporal. Dead. 

Grinell, Iowa. 

Dead. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Veteran. Transferred to B 58th Ind. M. O. 
58th July 25, '65, as Corpl. Died Nov. 3, 1902. 
Died Jan. 19, 1911. 

Linnsburg, Montgomery Co., Ind. 

Died at Crawfordsville Ind., June 22, 1S62. 

Veteran. Transferred to B 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Ind. July 25, 1865. Wichita, Kans. 
Died at Corinth, Miss., June 19, 1S62. 

Panora, Iowa. 

Died Aug. 13, 1911. 

Died Sept. 22, 1905. 

Died at Jeffersonville, Ind., Aug. 10, 1S64. 

Massey Rock, Lewis Co., Wash. 

Died Feb. 24, 1904. 

Garrison, Iowa. 

Died at Chattanooga, Tenn., Aug. 9, 1864. 

Died at Evansville, Ind., Aug. 19, 1S62. 

Died Aug. 9. 1907. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



6 9 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY B 



Montgomery County 



NAME AND BANK 



McKinzie, Jonathan — 
McCready, Emeriek -- 
McKinzie, Mordecai -- 

McKinzie, Joseph 

McLaughlin, John W. 
Marlow, George B. — 

Martin, Geo. P. 

Mote, James H. 

Moore, John A. 

Miller, John 

Miller, Leonard H. — 

Misner, Amos K. 

Nicholson, Samuel ___ 

Newkirk, William 

Ochiltree, Andrew 

Parsons, James H. __. 
Patterson, Samuel — 
Poague, William C. -- 

Poague, John H. 

Porter, William Y. ___ 

Porter, John C. 

Pickerell, John W. ___ 
Pruitt, George W. ___ 

Peterson, John _-_ 

Quire, Charles E. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 1 
Oct. 24, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dee. 2, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 2, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 2, 
Dec. 2, 



1861 
1861 
1863 
1863 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1S62 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1862 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
.Sept. 
Sept. 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 
5, 1864 
5, 1864 
5, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Mar. 19, 1863 

Nov. 11, 1862 

Oct. 22, 1863 

July 10, 1863 

Feb. 21, 1862 

July 10, 1863 



July 10, 1863 
July 10, 1863 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Be-Enlisted in 



Ohickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Kenesaw Mtn., Ga. 
Vining Stat'n, Ga. 



Mill Springs Jan. 
19, 1862 



Disability 

Disability 

Transfer 

Disability 

Wounds 

Disability 



Disability 
Disability 



Mill Springs, Ky. 
Jan. 19, 1862 



Mill Springs, Ky. 
Jan. 19, 1862 



LENGTH OF SEBVICE 



In Other Or- Total 
1 ganizations Service 



3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
9m 4 days 
9m 4 days 
ly 10m 12d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
6m 24 days 



4m 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 11 days 
4m 27 days 
ly 6m Id 
ly lm 24d 
2y lm 4d 
7m 8 days 
5m 3 days 
7m 8 days 
1 yr 20 days 
7m 21 days 
7m 8 days 
7m 8 days 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 7m 24d 
ly 7m 24d 
2y 9m 2d 
3 yrs 1 day 
3 yrs 1 day 
3 yrs 1 day 
3 yrs 1 day 
6m 24 days 



4m 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 11 days 
4m 27 days 

ly 6m Id 
ly lm 24d 

2y lm 4d 
7m 8 days 
5m 3 days 
7m 8 days 
1 yr. 20 days 
7m 21 days 
7m 8 days 
7m 8 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Dana, Vermillion Co., Ind. 
Hampton, Va. 

Recruit. Transferred to B 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Ind. July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Recruit. Transferred to B 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Ind. July 25, 1S65. Dead. 
Mustered Out 58th Ind. July 25, 1865. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Bonnie, Jefferson Co., 111. 

Ottawa, Kans. 

Dead. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Deserted at Corinth, Miss., May 12, '62. Dead. 

See Non-Commissioned Staff. 

Killed at Mill Springs Jan. 19, 1862. 

Died Sept. 17, 1908. 

Died at Corinth, Miss., May 29, 1862. 

Died at Somerset, Ky., Feb. 15, 1862. Wounds 

Darlington, Ind. 

Osage City, Kans. 

Transferred to U. S. Signal Corps. Dead. 

New Ross. Ind. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Killed at Perryvillc, Ky., Oct. 8, 1862. 

Died at Corinth, Miss., May 9, 1862. 

Died Aug. 20, 1901. 

Lynnville, Jasper Co., Iowa. 



70 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY B 



Montgomery County 



NAME AND RANK 



Rauth, John F. 

Roberts, James M. — 
Shoemaker, James A._. 

Simpson, John H. 

Simpson, John R. 

Simpson, William A. .. 

Snyder, James H. 

Sparks, Walter H. .... 

Stearns, Daniel W. 

Stonebraker, David A. 
Simpson, Thomas J. _. 
Stonebraker, William . 
Stubbins. Joseph L. _. 
Sweetzer, Abram C. — 

Stump, James W. 

Talbot, Nathaniel A. . 

Tate, John L. 

Tate, Samuel M. 

Tipton, George W. ... 
Vancleve, Benj. M. ... 
Vaneleve, -Tames M. __ 
Wilson, Thomas W. _ 
Williams, Thomas W. 
Wert. Martin V. _ 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept- 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Oct. 



1861 

1863 
1S61 
1801 
1881 
1861 
1861 
1861 
18S1 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1801 
1881 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1801 
1861 
1861 
1801 
1862 
1861 



Discharge 

from ttie 
Service 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 



1804 
1864 



Sept. 19, 
June 9, 



1864 
1862 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
May 1, 
Jan. 13, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Mar. 2, 
Mar. 21, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 
1804 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1862 
1864 
1864! 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Wounded at 



Exp. Service 
Disability 



Mill Springs, Jan 
19, 1862 



Mill Springs, Jan 
19, 1S62 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 



Mill Springs 
Mill Springs 



Chiekamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Sept. 19, 
Mar. 9, 
Sept. 19, 
May 18, 
Sept. 5, 



1864 
1863 
1864 
1863 

1864 



Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Trant fer 



Chiekamauga 



Re-Enlisted in 



B 58th Ind. Mar. 
14, 1865 



B 58th Ind. Mar. 
14, 1865 



Mil] Springs. Ky. 
Jan. 19, 1862 



Chiekamauga 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Mill Springs 
Chiekamauga 



3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 4 days 

1 yr. 20 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

8m 21 days 

5m 2 days 

4m 24 days 

yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 7m 13d 

2y 3m 26d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 1 day 

5m 14 days ; 

2y 6m 3d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

6m 13 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 5m 21d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3m 10 days 

2y Vim Id 



10m 12 days 



4m 11 days 
4m 11 days 



Total 
Service 



3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 7m 16d 
1 yr. 20 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 12 days 
5m 2 days 
4m 24 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3y 4m lid 



lm 16 days 



2y 8m 7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 1 day 

5m 14 days 

2y 6m 3d 
3 yrs. 1 day 

6m 13 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 5m 21d 
3 yrs. 1 day 



yrs 20 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



R. R. 12, Lebanon, Ind. 

Marion Home. 

Killed at Perryville, Ky., Oct. 8, 1862. 

Lincoln, Neb. 

Unknown. 

Died at Stamford, Ky., Feb. 20, 1862. 

Died at Mill Springs, Ky., Feb. 12, 1802. 

Marion, Sullivan Co., Ind. 

Lawrenceburg, Tenn. 

Alamo, Montgomery Co., Ind. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. Dead. 

Appointed Corporal. Died Mar. 13, 1910. 

Dead. 

Appointed Corporal. Wesley, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to B 58th Ind. M. 0. 

58th July 17, 1865. Died Sept. 21, 1897. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

Appointed Wagoner. Dead. 

Died at Somerset, Ky., Mar. 1, 1862. 

326 Bramer St., Topeka, Kans. 

Died Oct. 28, 1910. 

Dead. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 



COMPANY C 



This company was recruited at Frankfort. Clinton Coun- 
ty, Indiana, by A. O. Miller, James H. Boyl and Andrew Mer- 

I'itt. The following officers 
were elected : 

Capt., A. O. Miller 

ist Lieut. James H. Boyl 

2d Lieut., Andrew Merritt 

The company reported at 
"Camp Tippecanoe," La- 
Fayette, on the 22nd day 
of August, 1861. Upon ar- 
rival of the regiment at In- 
dianapolis, Captain Miller 
was commissioned Major 
of the regiment. Lieuten- 
ant Boyl was commissioned 
captain and James H. Mc- 
Adams first lieutenant. On 
the 18th day of September, 
1861, the company was 
mustered into the United 
States service with 101 
men. There were 16 re- 

CAPTAIN JAMKS H. BOYL, . .... , 

cruits received during the 
three years, making a total of 117 men. 




The losses sustained by the company during its term of 
service are as follows : 

Killed in battle 3 

Killed accidentally 1 

Resigned 1 

Discharged for disability 21 

Discharged on account of wounds 1 

Died from disease 7 

Captured 1 

Transferred to V. R. C 2 

Transferred to steamer "Baltic" 1 

Transferred to 58th Indiana Infantry. ... 19 

Deserted 1 

Mustered out September 19, 1864 59 

Total 117 

Company C occupied the position of the "Right Color 
Company," being on the right of the colors and David Louden, 
sergeant of this company, was color bearer up to the time he 
was transferred as a veteran to the 58th Indiana. The colors 
were well protected on the right as this company was composed 
of fighters from start to finish. 

Died since the war, 52; living at present date, 50; un- 
known, 1. 

For further information see Muster Roll. 



/J* 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY C 



Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Capt. Abram O. Miller 

1st Lieut. James H. Boyle.. 

2d Lieut. Andrew Merritt 

1st Sergt. Jas. H. McAdams 
2d Sergt. Thos. J. Thompson 
3d Sergt. James Newhouse... 

4th Sergt. James Hall 

5th Sergt. David Louden 

1st Corpl. Ifm. R, "Watson.. 
2d Corpl. Solomon Stafford. 

3d Corpl. John Harney 

4th Corpl. Israel Packer 

5th Corpl. Thomas Lucas... 

6th Corpl. Samuel Smith 

7th CorpL Joseph Toops 

Sth Corpl. Henry Edwards.. 
Drummer Chas. B. Marsteller 

Flier ¥m. B. Marsteller 

Wagoner Isaac N. Painter... 

Adair, James W. 

Allen, David P. 

Anderson, Asa 

Ashpaugh, Amos 



Sept. 
Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Sept. 
Mar. 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



1861 
1861 

1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1862 
1861 
1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Dec. 31, 1S61 



Sept, 19, 
Sept. 19, 
June 24, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 
1862 
1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Disability 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Transfer 



Chickamauga, Ga. 

Sept. 19, 1863 

Tullahoma, Tenn. 

June, 1863 



1864 Exp. Service 
1864 Exp. Service 



Sept, 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 



Exp. Service 
F^xp. Service 



June 13, 
June 28, 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 



1862 Disability 

1862 Disability 

Disability 

Disability 

1864 Exp. Service 



1864 
1864 
1864 

1864 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Chattahooehie 

River, Ga., July 9, 

1S64 



Chickamauga, Ga 

Struck 3 times 

Chickamauga, Ga 

Sent. 19, 1863 



Kenesaw Mtn., Ga 

1864 

Chickamauga, Ga 

Sept. 19, 1863 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



3 yrs. 1 day 

4m 3 days j 

4m 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 6 days 

2y 11m 17d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 10m 29d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

ly lm 23d 

8m 20 days 

9m 10 days 



3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 4 days 
2y 6m 3d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
6m 4 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



3 yrs. 1 day 

4m 3 days 

4m 1 da.y 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 6 days 

3y 10m 7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 10m 29d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

ly m 23d 

8m 20 days 

9m 10 days 



10m 20 days 



10m 2(1 clays 



3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 6m 24d 
2y 6m 3d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 4m 24d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Promoted Major. See Field and Staff. 

Promoted Captain Sept. 22, 1861. 
704 Lord St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Re-Commissioned 2d Lieut. May 30, 1862. 

Resigned June 20, 1862. Died April 12, 1903. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. Sent. 22, 1861. 

Killed at Mill Springs Jan. 19, 1862. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. Jan. 20, 1862. Dead. 

Appointed 1st Sergt. Soldiers' Home, 

Leavenworth, Kans. 
Mulberry, Ind. 

Veteran. Transferred to C, 58th Ind. 

M. O. 5Sth Ind. July 25, 1S65. Dead. 
Appointed Sergeant. Died April, 1902. 

Reduced to ranks. Frankfort, Ind. 

Veteran. Killed at Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 17, '64. 

Died Dee. 26, 1909. 

Appointed Sergeant. 4107 Clayton St.. 

Denver, Colo. 
Died at Louisville, Ky., Nov. 10, 1S62. 

Frankfort, Ind. 

Dead. 

No date of discharge. Dead. 

No date of discharge. Died Jan. 20, 1896. 

Dead. 

Recruit, Transferred to O 5Sth Ind. M. O. 

38th July 25, 1865. Forest, Ind. 
Promoted 2d Lieut. Oct. 28, 1862. 

Died Sept, 16, 1911. 
Jasper, Ark. 

Recruit. Transferred to C 58th Ind. M. O. 
58th July 25. 1865. Forest, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



73 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY C 



Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Bates, Charles 

Bailess, William H. 
Batterton, Jeremiah 
Benjamin, Abram _. 

Berge, Jasper 

Bennett, Elias B. _— 

Bennett, David 

Bitting;, John 

Blystone, Geo. A. _._ 
Blacklidge, Jesse ___ 

Booher, Alfred 

Booher, Alnheus 

Booher, Amos P. ___ 

Brant, John 

Brant, David 

Brooks, Thomas ___ 

Burns, James 

Cast, James R. 

Cain, Frank 

Clark, Cyrus 

Counts, Martin 

Cressman, Milton _. 
Cunningham, Wm. . 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
June 20, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Sept. IS, 1S01 

Sept. 18, 1861 

Sept. 18, 1861 

No record as 
to date 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



10, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 



Sept. 
April 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Aug. 



1863 
19, 1864 
10, 1861 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
13, 1862 
19, 1864 
16, 1862 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 



Cause of I „, , . . 
Discharge J Wounded at 



Exp. Service . 



Re-Enlisted in 



Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp 
Exp, 
Exp. 



Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 
Service 



Mill Springs, Ky. 
Jan. 19, 1863 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 186S 



Chickamauga, Ga. 

Sept. 19, 1863 

Kenesaw Mtn., Ga. 

June 24, 1S64 
Chickamauga, Ga. 

Sept. 20, 1863 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 



Exp. Service, Chickainauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Mill Springs, Ky. 
Jan. 19, 1862 



Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Transfer 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3 yrs. 1 day 
ly lm 18il 
4m 7 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
2m 3 days 



G 86th Ind. Aug. 
16, 1862 



3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 6m 22d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
10m 25 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs 28 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 2m lOd 
3 yrs. 1 day 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



3 yrs. 1 day 
ly lm 18d 
4m 7 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
2m 3 da; 



3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 6m 22d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
10m 25 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs 2S days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 2m lOd 
3 yrs. 1 da: 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Died April 7, 1910. 

Died at Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 6, 1863. 

Promoted 2d Lieut, June 20, 1862. Died at 

Howling Green. Ky., Oct. 27, 1862. 
Appointed Corporal. Dead. 

500 South Wright, Champaign, 111. 

Died Feb. 5, 1903. 

Mulberry, Ind. 

Died at Soldiers' Home, Dayton, Ohio. 

Frankfort, Ind. 

Dead. 

Died at Lebanon, Ky., Nov. 21, 1861. 

No date of discharge. Dead. 

Died Nov. 20, 1905. 

Transferred to Rgt. Vet. Reserve Corps, April 

10, 1S04. Okmulgee, Ind. Tcr. 
Frankfort, Ind. 

Died Sept. 24. 1910. 

Dead. 

Michigantown, Ind. 

Sent home on furlough. Transferred from 
86th to Vet. Reserve Corps Sept 7, 1863. M. O. 
Rgt. V. R. O. Frankfort, Ind. 

Appointed Sergeant. Frankfort, Ind. 

Died at Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 28, 1863. 

Dead. 

Recruit. Transferred to C 58th Ind. M. O. 
5Sth July 25, 1865. Died Mar. 16, 1898. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY C 



Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Dick, Morgan 

Diet, Mahlon 

Dulin, Henry 

Earlyvrine, John — 
Finney, Win. F. ___ 

Fudge. Henry 

Gallagher. Lucien _ 
Gallagher, Milton __ 
Goar, Joseph J. ___ 
Goff, George W. __ 

Goff, John TV. 

Goff, Thomas C. ._ 

Gray, Eben 

Hamme], Henry 

Hammel, Jonas 

Hallman, Henry 

Harlan, Oliver 

Harlan, William C. 

Haines, James 

Holliker, John 

Jett, John H. 

Lett, John P. 

Leverton, Andrew _ 

Louden, Samuel 

Lucas, Jackson 

Lucas. Joseph I. __. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 
Oct. 15, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Jan. 16, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Jan. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept 



1861 Sept. 
186li Sept. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 

Sept. 
April 
Sept. 
Feb. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



23, 1863 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 

5, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
1862 
19, 1864 

1, 1862 
19, 1864 
11, 1862 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

June 

Nov. 



5, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1868 
14, 1862 
18, 1862 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sent. 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounds 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Wounds 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Disability 
Disability 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Chattanooga 

Jan. 1, 1S63 

Chickaruauga 

Sept. 19, 1863 



Buzzard Roost, 
Ga., Feb., 1864 



Atlanta, Ga., 
Aug., 1864 



Mill Springs 

Jan. 19, 1862 

Columbia, Tenn., 

Mar., 1862 



Adairsville, Ga., 
June, 1864 



Mill Springs, Ky. 

Jan. 19, 1862 
Chickamauga, Ga 

Sept. 19, 1863 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 20, 1863 



Re-Enlisted in 



C 58th Ind. Nov. 
11, 1864 



H, 3d Ind. Cav. 
Aug. 26, 1862 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



ly 4m 5d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 10m 21d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
5m 22 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

7 months 
3 yrs. 1 day 
4m 21 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 26 days 
7m 20 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 3m Id 
8m 27 days 
1 year 2m 

2 yrs 2 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



8m 14 days 



Total 
Service 



ly 5m 21d 
2y 9m 13d 



10m 20 days 



2 yrs 19 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 10m 21d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 11m 13d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3y 4m 13d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
4m 21 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 26 days 
ly 6m lOd 
3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 3m Id 
Sm 27 days 
1 year 2m 

2 yrs 2 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



M. O. 58th July 25, 1865. Died Jan. 6, 1908. 

Russiaville, Ind. 

Oativood, 111. 

Recruit. Transferred to C 58th Ind. Dead. 

Scireleville, Ind. 

Died at Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 1, 1864. Wounds. 

Bartlesville, Ind. Ter. 

Died Nov. 5, 1906. 

Mora, Minn. 

Died at Lebanon, Ind. 

2202 Madison St., Anderson, Ind. 

Transferred to K Sth Ind. Cav. from 3d Cav. 
M. O. June 18, '65, Sth Cav. Died Mar., 1906. 
Dead. 

Left arm amputated. Mulberry, Ind. 

Dead. 

Pettit, Tippecanoe Co., Ind. 

Died in Clinton Co., Ind., July 14, 1862. 

Recruit. Transferred to C 5Sth Ind. M. O. 

5Sth Ind. July 25, 1S65. Dead. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

Died Dec. 28, 1906. 

Dead. 

Killed at Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 20, 1S63. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Frankfort, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



75 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY C 



Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Maher, Thomas 

Mann, Austin 

Mann, Jacob ___ 

Mannus, Jesse F. 

Mannus, John W. 

Mellott, James 

Meacham, Harvey 

Merritt, Alonzo 

Miller, Jacob 

McKelvey, John B. 

Orr, Thomas 

Packer, Alonzo 

Packer, James M. 

Perceval, James 

Perrine, John M. 

Perrine, Daniel R. 

Petra, John 

Poundstone, Alfred M. 
Price, James A. 



Randall, William B. 
Riley, Cornelius 



Entry into 
the Service 



Rishel, John 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Jan. 7, 
Jan. 7, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 
Jan. 10, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Oct. 15, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 
1864 
1861 
1861 
1864 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 



Sept. 18, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 5, 
Dee. 23, 



1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Disability 



Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 
Aug. 13, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 



May 18, 
Sept. 5, 



1864 
1864 
1864 



1864 Transfer 



1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1862 
1864 
1884 
1864 



1862 
1864 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Disability 
Transfer 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Chickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 20, 1863 



Near Reseea, Ga., 
May 13, 1864 



Chickamauga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Buzzard Roost, _ 
Ga., Feb. 23, 1864 



Chickamauga 

Sept. 19, 1863 

Perryville, Kv., 

Oct. 8, '62; Tulla- 

homa, June 29, '63: 

Chickamauga, Ga. 

Sent. 19, 1863: 

Atlanta, Ga., 

Aug. 5, 1864 



Atlanta, Ga., 
July 24. 1864 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

7m 28 days 

7m 28 days 
ly 3m 5d 

lm 23 days 

7m 20 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 20d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 17d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
10m 25 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 17d 
3 yrs. 1 day 



8 months 
2y 11m 17d 



In Other Or 
gamzations 



10m 20 days 
6m 23 days 



Total 
Service 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



8m 20 days 



3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 11m lSd 

ly 2m 21d 

ly 3m 5d 

lm 23 days 

ly 6m lOd 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 20d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 10m 7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

10m 25 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 10m Yd 

3 yrs. 1 day 



3y 8m 7d 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Dead. 
Dead. 
Hillisburg, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to C 58th Ind.. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Recruit. Transferred to C 58th Ind. Disch'gd 

from 58th Mar. 28, 1865. Disability. Dead. 
Dead. 

Left Regiment New Haven, Ky., Nov. 11, 1861. 

Unknown. 
Recruit. Transferred to C 58th Ind. M. 0. 

58th July 25, 1865. Kempton, Ind. 
Owasco, Carroll Co., Ind. 

639 12th St., Logansport, Ind. 

Died Aug. 26, 1910. 

1305 Summit Place, Rockford, 111. 

Colburn, Ind. 

Veteran. Transferred to C 58th Ind. M. O. 
58th July 25, '65. Soldiers' Home, Lafayette. 
Felsenthal, Union Co., Ark. 

Thorntown, Ind. 

4301 Clayton St., Denver, Colo. 

Veteran. 'Transferred to> C 58th Ind. M. O. 
58th July 25, 1865, as Corpl. Died Mar., 1910. 
Frankfort, Ind 



Died July, 1902. 

Veteran. Transferred to C 5Sth Ind. M. 0. 
58th May 25, 1865. Left arm torn off by 
shell at Camp "64 Pounder." Dead. 

Transferred to Steamer Baltic. 1708 Mehavry 
St., Lafayette, Ind. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY C 



Clinton County 





Entry into 
the Service 


Discharge 

from the 

Service 


Cause of 
Discharge 


Wounded at 


Re-Enlisted in 


LENGTH OE SERVICE 




NAME AND RANK 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 


















Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. M. 0. 

58th July 25, 1865. Kempton, Ind. 
Scircleville, Ind. 




Sept. IS, 1861 
Sept. IS, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept, 18, 1861 

Sept, 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. IS, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Jan. 7, 1864 
Feb. 4, 1862 

Feb. 8, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Aug. 2(3, 1862 
Aug. 26, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1S61 


Sept. 19, 1864 
Aug. 13, 1862 
Dec. 23, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1884 

Sept. 19, 1864 
Dec. 23, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 


Exp. Service 






3 yrs. 1 day 




3 yrs. 1 day 
10m 26 days 

2y 3m 5d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 




Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 














2y 3m 5d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 




Monmouth, Crawford Co., Kans. 












Chattahoocbie 
River, Ga., 
July 5, 1864 








Seager, Robt, W. 






Appointed Corporal. Frankfort, Ind. 


Disability 
Exp. Service 






2y 3na 5d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
































Sept. 5, 1S84 
Sept. 5, 1884 

Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 


Transfer 
•Transfer 

Transfer 
Exp. Service 

Transfer 






Sm 2 days 
7m 1 day 

2y 6m 25d 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2 yrs 10 days 
ly 3m 2d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
2y llm I7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

19 days 
ly lm 26d 
2y llm I7d 
3 yrs. 1 day 


10m 20 days 
6m 23 days 

10m 20 days 


ly 6m 22d 
ly lm 24d 

3y 5m 15d 


dianapolis Aug. 25, 1S65. 
Recruit. Transferred to C 58th Ind. M. 0. 5Stb 








Ind. July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Captured at Ohickamauga, Ga., Sept. 19. 1863. 








Recruit. Transferred to C 58th Ind. M. 0. 
oSth Mar. 28, 1S65. Dead. 
Recruit. Transferred to C 58th Ind. M. 0. 








July 25, 1S65. Dead. 








9 months 


2y 9m lOd 
ly 3m 2d 


Recruit. Transferred to 5Sth Ind. M. 0. 








5Sth June 5, 1865. Columbus, Kans. 
Died at LaFayette, Ind., Nov. 28, 1863. 




Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 


Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 








Sedalia, Ind. 






10m 20 days 


3y 10m 7d 


Veteran. Transferred to C 5Sth Ind. M. 0. 








5Sth July 25, 1S65. Died Aug. 12, 1905. 
Goldsmith, Ind. 












Kemnton, Ind. 


Widener, Wm. H. . 


Sept. 18, 1861 












Accidentally killed at Bardstown, Ky., Oct. 7, 




Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 


Nov. 13, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1884 


Disability 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 




Co. K 147 Ind. Inf. 


5m 27 days 
10m 20 days 


ly 7m 23d 
3y 10m 7d 


1S61. 
Frankfort, Ind. 


Williams, Wm. L 




Veteran. Transferred to C 5Sth Ind. M. 0. 


Wilson, Philip H. . .. 


Ohickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 1ft, 1863 




5Sth July 25, '65. as Sergt. Died Oct. 22. 1903. 
Dead. 















COMPANY D 



By P'. M. Wiles. 

This company was organized at Montmorenci, Tippecanoe 
Count}-, Indiana, on the 6th day of September, 1861, and 
marched to LaFayette, same afternoon, going into "Camp Tip- 
pecanoe," on South Fourth street, about 4 o'clock, where the 

Tenth Indiana Infantry was 
recruiting for the three years' 
service. 

The arrival of this com- 
pany completed the organiza- 
tion of the regiment to ten full 
companies. 

Some time early in August 
after the Tenth had returned 
from its three months' service, 
Colonels Manson and Kise 

\came to Montmorenci to plead 
with the people the necessity 
to increase the army and as- 
sist President Lincoln in re- 
storing the Union and put 
down the rebellion. 
The meeting was largely attended and great enthusiasm 
manifested. An appointment was made for a later meeting 
some two weeks later, at which it was decided to organize a 
company. 




/ 



CAPTAIN WARREN SHEETZ 



In the meantime several organizations were perfected. One 
in Benton County, on Pine Creek, by Joseph H. Taylor; an- 
other under Job H. VanNatta at a place called "Henpeck," 
near where Otterbein now stands, and another at Union School 
House in Wabash Township by James Laroe. 

After the second meeting, the three organizations consult- 
ed with each other and arranged for a monster war meeting at 
Montmorenci on September 6th. The loyal ladies of the neigh- 
borhood agreed to furnish a big basket dinner for the occasion. 

Among those who assisted and gave their influence to the 
organization were W. S. VanNatta, Harvey Westfall, Samuel 
I. Goclman, Thomas Daugherty, Aaron VanNatta and Uncle 
George Westfall and all the loyal women in the community. 

Early in the forenoon the crowd began to gather from 
Benton, Warren, Jasper, Newton and Tippecanoe Counties. 
and by the time dinner was ready to serve one hundred and two 
men had volunteered. The company being recruited to its 
full limit, dinner was served and everybody was happy. 

After dinner the organization was perfected by electing 
Joseph H. Taylor, Captain 
Job IT. VanNatta, First Lieutenant 
Stephen Sappington, Second Lieutenant 
James T. Daugherty, First Sergeant. 

After the election a motion was made that we immediately 
march to LaFayette (nine miles) which was carried unani- 
mously and amid shouts of "good-bye" and "God bless you 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



all," we marched into camp and slept on a bed of straw for our 
first night. 

The counties furnished men as follows : Tippecanoe, 60 ; 
Benton, 26; Warren, 9; Jasper, 5; Newton, 1 ; Illinois, 1. 

Upon arrival at Indianapolis the company was sworn into 
the United States service with 101 men, all the law allowed. 
The extra man, James Downing, was rejected by Gen. Wood, 
the mustering officer. During the service the company received 
31 recruits, which made 132 men serving in the compaii)' dur- 
ing the three Years service. 



By the Author. 

The losses sustained by the company during its service 
were as follows : 

Killed in battle 6 

Died of wounds 3 



Died of injury 1 

Died of disease 17 

Promoted 4 

Resigned 3 

Discharged on account of disability 11 

Transferred to V. R. C 3 

Transferred to Miss. Marine Brigade. ... 2 

Deserted 1 

Transferred to 58th Indiana Infantry. . . .30 

Total loss 81 

The total loss to the company being 81 and the number 
mustered out September 19, 1864, being 51, makes the total in 
the company during the service 132. Number of deaths since 
the war, 57 ; living at the present time 42. 

The following muster roll will give further information in 
regard to this company: 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



79 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY D 



Benton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Capt. Joseph P. Taylor 

1st Lieut. Job H. Van Nntta 
•2d Lt. Stephen Sappington__ 
1st Sergt. James Daugherty. 

2d Sergt. James Laroe 

3d Sergt. Warren Sheets 

4th Sergt. Levi Hawkins 

5th Sergt. Alonzo Cowgill_„ 
1st Corpl. Hallet Swift 

2d Corpl. Ross Magee 

3d Opl. Wilbur F. Stevenson 

4th Corpl. James Kiilen 

5th Corpl. Jas. R. Godman_ 
6th Cpl. Dav W. Miilholland 
7th Corpl. James B. Shaw— 

8th Cpl Ant'y C. Thompson 
Drummer Salathiel CowgilL 

Fifer Perry L. Jennings 

Wagoner Win. A. Wells 

Adwell, Joseph M. 

Auth, Garrett 

Auth, John 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 2, 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Sept. 18, 1661 
Sept. IS, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1S61 
Sept. 18, 1861 

Sept. 18, 1S61 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. IS, 1861 
Sept. 18. 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Mar. 20, 
Sept. 20, 
Mar. 20, 



1862 
1864 
1862 



Dec. 24, 
Sept. 19, 

Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Feb. 15, 

Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 

Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 

1864 
1864 
1864 

1864 
1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Resignation 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Oct. 15, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Wounded at 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Resignation 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 

Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 

Exp. Service . 

Exp. Service _ 

I 
Exp. Serviced 

Disability i_ 

Transfer j_ 

Exp. ServiceL 

Exp. Service _ 

Exp. Service;.. 



Chickamauga, Ga, 

Sept. 19, 1863 
Chickamauga, Ga. 

Sept. 19, 1863 
Perryville. Ky., 

Oct. S, 1862 
Chickamauga, Ga. 

Sept. 20, 1863 



Re-Enlisted in 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



I 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



6m 18 days 
3 yrs 18 days 

6m 18 days 

5m 17 days 
2y 3m 6d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 4m 27d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2 yrs. 2 days 

3 yrs. 1 clay 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
11m 27 days 
2y 11m 17d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
26 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



8m 7 days 



Total 
Service 



6m 18 days 
3 yrs 18 days 
6m IS days 
5m 17 days 
2y 3m 6d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 4m 27d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2 yrs. 2 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
11m 27 days 
3y 7m 24d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
26 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Promoted Major Nov. 18, 1862. Promoted 

Lieut. Colonel Sept. 21, 1863. LaFayette, Ind. 
Dead. 

Died at Somerset, Ky., Mar. 7, 1862. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. Promoted 1st Lieut. 

Nov. 18, 1862. Dead. 
Promoted 1st Lieut. Mar. 20, 1862. Promoted 

Captain Nov. 18, 1862. Died April 21, 1907. 
Promoted 2d Lieut. Nov. 18, 1862. Promoted 

1st Lieut. Dec. 25, '63. 831 N. 9th, LaFayette. 
Appointed 1st Sergeant. Died Jan. 22, 1889. 

Transferred to Vet. Reserve Corps. Dead. 



Appointed Sergeant. Dead. 

Appointed Sergeant. Monticello, 111. 

Promoted Asst. Surgeon Feb. 18, 1863. 

Died Feb. 28, 1880. 
Killed at Chickamauga, Sept. 20, 1863. 

Appointed Sergeant. Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Reduced to Ranks Dee. 25, 1861. Appointed 
Hospital Steward July 16, 1862. See N. C. 
Staff, LaFayette, Ind. 

Was detached from Company as Surgeon 13th 
Ind. Batty, L. A. Died Jan. 13. 1897. 

DCad. 

Veteran. Transferred to D 58th Ind. M. O. 
5Sth May 25, 1865. Glasoo, Cloud Co., Kans. 
Died April 4, 1911. 

Dead. 

Died 1S90. 

Died Oct. 14, 1861, at Bardstown, Ky. 



,V- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY D 



Benton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Balentyne, Samuel 

Bannon, George W. __. 

Barnard, John W. 

Barnard, Ira D. 

Baker, Charles 

Bennett, Thomas F. S.. 
Boekover, John M. __•_. 

Bowyer, Daniel C. 

Bowling, Charles 

Brink, Bobt. N. 

Brown, William H. 

Campbell, Alexander _. 
Chenoweth, Isaac N. __ 
Coffman, James W. __. 

Coffman, John X. 

Cook, Thomas M. 

Creek, Calvin 

Cuppy, Hoses 

Davis, John G. 

Davis, Thomas M. 

Dawson, Charles II. ___ 

Dolohan, John F. 

Dexter, Geo. J. 

Downing, Aneil B. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. IS, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Jan. 7, 
Aug. 14, 
Aug. 24, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 1(5, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dee. 16, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 
1862 
1S62 
1861 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1863 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1S64 
June 8, 1863 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounded at 



Exp. Service . 



Exp. Service . 
Transfer '. 



Sept. 19, 1864; Exp. Service . 
Exp. Service . 
Transfer I. 
Transfer I. 



Sept, 19, 1S64 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 



Oct. 14, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Re-Enlisted in 



Co. H 154 Ind. Inf. 



Marine Brigade, 
June 8, 1863 



Disability 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Sept, 19, 1864 Exp. Service 



Dec. 15, 1863 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1S63 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



ly 5m 2d 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 8m 12d 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 8m 13d 

4m 2 days 
3 yrs. 1 lay 
3 yrs. ) day 

7m 28 days 

2 yrs 22 days 
lm 21 days 

1 yr. 26 days 
8m 20 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

4m 22 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
4m 5 days 
2y 2m 17d 
8m 20. days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
2y lm 22d 



3 yrs. 1 day 



In Other Or-j 
ganizations 



4m 7 days 



9m 15 days 
10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



ly 5m 2d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 8m 12d 

3y 4m 8d 



4m 2 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 5m 13d 

2y 11m 12d 

lm 21 days 
1 yr. 26 days 

ly 7m lOd 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

4m 22 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

4m 5 days 
3 years 

ly 7m lOd 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y lm 22d 



3 yrs. 1 day 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Died Gen. Thomas' Headquarters Peb. 20, 1863. 

Box 72, Elwood, Ind. 

Veteran. Died at Nashville, Tenn., May 30, '64. 

M. 0. 154th Aug. 4, 1865. Died Mar. 29, 1896. 

Dead. 

Died at Campbellsville, Ky., Jan. 20, 1862. 

Dead. 

Fowler, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to D 58th Ind. Deserted 

from 58th June 20, 1865. Dead. 
Recruit. Transferred to D 58th Ind. M. 0. 

58th July 25, 1865. Gallatin, Tenn. 
Deserted Oct. 15, 1S68, at Danville, Ky. Dead. 

Died 1898. 

Recruit. Transferred to D 58th Ind. M. 0. 
Mth Ind. July 2.5, 1865. Died Aug. 13, 1905. 
Pawnee, Pawnee Co., OkLi. 

Died in Missouri from wounds, in 1874. 

Died at Oampbellsville, Ky., Peb. 12, 1862. 

R. R. 1, Rosalia, Butler Co., Kans. 

Died at Campbellsville, Ky., Jan. 23, 1862. 

Transferred to Vet, Reserve Corps Dec. 15, '63. 

M. 0. Sept. 18,'64. Servey, Greenwood Co., Ks. 
Recruit. Transferred to D 5Sth Ind. M. 0. 58th 

Ind. July 25, 1865, as Sergeant. LaPayette. 
Oxford, Ind. 

Died Nov. 10, 1863. WOunds. 

Recruit. Transferred to D 58th Ind. M. O. 5Sth 

July 25, '65. 116 Marsteller St., W. Laft. 
Died Sent, 15, 1905. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Si 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY D 



Benton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Downing, Wingate T. 
Evans, Joseph H. _— 
Evans, Jonathan W. 
Fetters, Nelson D. . _. 

Fisher, William 

Foster, Henry 

Foster, John L. 

Foster, Josiah J. 

Gaines, Daniel R. 

Gear, John M 

Grant, John A, 

Haigh, George W. _.. 
Hampton, Robt. W. . 
Harbison, John M.__. 

Hawkins, James 

Herron, Jonas 

Hinote, Joseph 

Holton, William B.__. 

Horner, Samuel 

Jakes, Michael 

Jakes, Nelson M. 

Jennings, Elnathan C 
Johnson, Charles J. . 
TCillen, John F. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 16, 
Dec. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Aug. 24, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Jan. 7, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1863 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 
ISfil 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 

5, 1864 

6, 1864 
5, 1864 
5, 1864 

19, 1864 
19, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Sept. 19, 1864 Exp. Service 



Sept. 19, 1864 Exp. Service 



April 10, 186: 
Feb. 27, 1863 
Sept. 18, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Oct. 29, 1862 



Transfer 

Disability 

Disability 

Exp. Service 

Transfer 

Disability 



Wounded at 



Re Enlisted in 



Kenesaw Mtn., Ga 
July 2, 1864 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 19 days 
8m 19 days 
2y 11m 17d 
2y 11m 17d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3m 23 days 

2 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
1 yr. 25 days 



2 yrs 2 days 



ly 5m 9d 

1 year 

3 yrs. 1 day 

7m 28 days 

ly lm lid 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 

10m 20 days 

10m 20 days 

10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 7m 9d 
ly 7m <Jd 
3y 10m 7d 
3y 10m 7d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3m 23 days 

2 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
1 yr. 25 days 



2 yrs. 2 days 



ly 5m 9d 

1 year 

3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 6m 18d 

ly lm lid 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Died July, 1907. 

LaFayette, Ind. 

Box 395, Richmond, Ind. 

Dead. 

St. Vrain, New Mex. 

Ambia, Benton Co., Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. O. 

July 25, 1865. Perkins, Payne Co., Okla. 
Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. O. 

July 25, 1865. Otterbein, Ind. 
Veteran. Appointed Corpl. Transferred to D 

58th Ind. Dead. 
Veteran. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. 

Died April 12, 1903. 
Ogden, Utah. 

1918 West 21st St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Died at Ringgold, Ga., April 19, 1864. 

Killed at Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 19, 1863. 

Dead. 

Recruit. Killed at Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 

19, 1863. 
Died July 31, 1905. 

Appointed Corpl. Killed at Chickamauga, Ga., 

Sept. 20, 1863. 
Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

Died Aug. 28, 19C6. 
Delphi, Ind. 

Died Jan. 30, 1900. 

Died Oct. 12, 1891. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. O. 

July 25, 1865. Died Sept. 22, 1909. 
Dead. 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INEANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY D 



Benton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Little, Elisha - 

Loomis, Luther 

Loughton, William _ 
Maddox, Francis M. 

Mason, Elihu 

Mason, Meridith B. 
Mead, Patrick M. __ 
Mellvaine, Samuel _ 
McQueen, Robert 6. 
Miller, Anthony C. _ 

Miller, George 

Moore, Henry H. „_ 
Moore, Henry H. B. 
Moore, Perry 0. ___ 
MeLain, Ferguson _ 
Moffitt, Benj. R. __. 

Nu==, Samuel E. 

Nuss, George W. ___ 

Nash, Amos W. 

Nagie, Albert H. ___ 

Nagle, -John P. 

Owens, Wm. W. 

Page, Nathan J. ___ 
Pratt, William H. _ 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. IS, 
Sept. IS, 
Dec. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 16, 
Jan. 7, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 16, 
Dec. 16, 
Dec. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Nov. 16, 
Dec. 16, 
Dec. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dee. 16, 



1861 
1861 



1S64 
1S61 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 20, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1861 
1861 
1864 
1S64 
1864 
1864 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Dec. 23, 
Sept. 5, 



1864 
1864 
1864 
1862 
1864 



June 18, 
Sept. 19, 
1861 Sept. 19, 
1861 

1863 Sept. 5, 

1863 

1861 Sept. 19, 
1861 Sept. 19, 

1864 __ _. 



1862 
1864 
1864 



1864 



1864 
1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Transfer 
Exp. Servic< 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Disability 
Transfer 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Transfer 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Mill Springs, Jan 
19, 1862 



Chickamauga 



Chickamauga 



Re-Enlisted in 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



9m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 17d 

9m 19 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 4 days 

7m 28 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 9m 28d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 17d 

ly 3m 5d 

9m 19 days 

9m 19 days 

5m 14 days 
9 months 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

6ni 13 days I 

9m 19 days 10m 20 days 

4m 29 days j 

3 yrs. 1 dayL_ _ 

3 yrs. 1 day 

4m 29 days ______________ 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 9m 7d 

ly 8m 9d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 4 days 

ly 6m 18d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 9m 28d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 10m 7d 

ly 3m 5d 

ly Sm 9d 

ly 8m 9d 

5m 14 days 

9 months 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

6m 13 days 

lv 8m 9d 

4m 29 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

4m 29 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Appointed Corporal. Williamsport, Ind. 

Veteran. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. 0. 

June 25, 1S65. Dead. 
Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. 0. 

July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Appointed Corp]. Otterbein, Ind. 

Promoted Chaplain Feb. 23, 1864. Recruit. 

See Field and Staff. Unknown. 
Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. 0. 

July 25, 1865. Glendora, Cal. 
Died March 8, 1906. 

Appointed Corpl. Died Sept. 8, 1863. Injuries 

received at Shell Mound, Tenn. 
Died March 2, 1902. 

909 West Eighth St., Muncie, Ind. 

425 Cherokee St., Leavenworth, Kan. 

Died June 20, 1906. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. O. 

July 25, 1865. Logansport, Ind. 
Recruit. Transferred to 5Sth Ind. Inf. M. 0- 

July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Recruit. Died at Ringgold, Ga., May 30, 1864. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Recruit. 



Died at Cairo, 111., May 29, 1862. 

M. 0. 



Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. 

July 25, 1865. Died April 30, 1904. 
Recruit. Died at Ringgold, Ga., May 13, 1864. 

Aurelia, Iowa. 

Dead. 

Recruit. Died at Ringgold, Ga., May 13, 1864. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



83 



Three Years Service. 



COMPANY D 



Benton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Pugh, George M. 

Reed, Charles 

Reeder, William 

Riley, John 

Riley, Edward 

Robinson, "William O. 

Robinson, Francis M. 

Rogers, Henry 

Ross, James 

Rittenour, Josepb F F 

Sauster, James 

Shambaugh, Jacob 

Sheets, Alfred 

Sheets, Frederick 

Shighley, Geo. W. 

Simmons, Samuel M. 

Snyder, James M. 

Sparrow, Ebenezer E. 

Stackhouse, Charles W. - 

Stair, Albert 

Stanfleld, Joel 

Switzer, John W. 

Timmons, John W 



Entry into Discharge 

the Service fr ° m . thc 
Service 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Aug. 24, 
Sept. 18, 
Dee. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 

Sept. 18, 
Aug. 14, 
Sept. 11, 
Dee. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Aug. 24, 
Aug. 24, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 

1861 
1862 
1862 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Date unk'wn 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Disability 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept, 

Sept. 
Feb. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Jan. 



5, 1864 
5, 1864 
5, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 

19, 1864 
19, 1864 
5, 1864 
5, 1864 
19, 1864 
31, 1863 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



5, 1864 
5, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 



Transfer 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Disability 

Transfer 

Transfer 

Exp. Service 

Transfer 



Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Mill Springs, Jan. 
19, '62; Chickamau- 
ga, Sent. 19, '63 



Chickamauga, 
Sept. 19, 1863 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



3 years 
2 yrs. 8 days 



2y 8m 3d 

1 year 3m 
2y 11m 7d 
9m 19 days 
2y 11m 7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 6m 5d 
ly 11m 24d 
9m 19 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 3m 13d 
ly lm 4d 

2 yrs 11 days 

2 yrs 11 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

5m 13 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



8m 29 days 
10m 20 day! 



ly 7m 17d 



8m 29 days 
8m 29 days 



Total 
Service 



2 years 
2 yrs. 8 days 



2y 8m 3d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



3y 10m 7d 
ly 8m 9d 
3y 10m 7d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs 1 day 
ly 6m 5d 

2y 8m 23d 
ly 8m 9d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 years 

ly lm 4d 

2y 9m 9d 

2y 9m 9d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
5m 13 days 



Died wounds Sept. 19, 1863. 

Killed on Picket front Chattanooga, Tenn., 

Sept. 26, 1863. 
Dead. 

Died wounds at Kenesaw Mtn., Ga., June 21, '64. 

Recruit. Died at Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 24, 

1863. 
Veteran. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. O. 

July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. O. 

July 25, 1865. West LaFayettc, Ind. 
Veteran. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. 0. 

July 25, 1S65. Died February, 1890. 
Died Oct. 10, 1910. 

Dead. 

R. R, 1, Powell, Knox Co., Tenn. 



Dead. 

Recruit, Dead. 

Recruit. Appointed Corpl. Transferred to 58th 
Ind. Inf. M. O. June 4, '65. LaFayette, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. 0. 
July 25, 1865. Dead. 

Kingfisher, Okla. 

Mississippi Marine Brigade. Norton, Kan. 

Appointed Corpl. Died at Danville, Ky., Oct. 

22, 1862. 
Recruit. Transferred to 53th Ind. Inf. M. 0. 

June 4, 1865. Herman, Neb. 
Recruit. Appointed Corpl. Transferred to D 

58th. M. 0. June 4, '65. Buck Creek, Ind. 
Died Jan. 22, 1908. 

Died March 15, 1S07. 

Died at Somerset, Ky., March 1, 1862. 



84 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY D 



Benton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Thompson, Thomas J 

Turvey, James K. 

Yorhees, David 

Whitmore, John 

White, Benjamin P. _ 

Whited, James 

Woodhams, Philip — 

Woodhams, Henry 

Woodhams, Fred J. _. 

Williams, Finley 

Williams, Alexander _ 

Wiles, Peter II. 

Willis, George 

Welch, John 

Weher, John 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. IS 
Sept. 18 : 
Sept. 18. 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Der;. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dee. 16, 



1S61 
1S61 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Feb. 12, 1S63 
Sept. 19, 1864 
1S61 Sept. 19, 1864 
1861| 

1861 ! 

1861 



1S61 
1861 
1863 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1863 



Jan. 7, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 

Sept. 5, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 

Transfer 



Chickamauga, 
Sept. 19, 1863 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



ly 4m 24d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

5m 17 days 

1 yr. 26 days 
8m 2 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
9m 19 days 
2y 11m 17d 

2 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

9m 19 days 

7m 28 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



10m 20. days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



ly 4m 24d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

5m 17 days 
1 yr. 26 days 

8m 2 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 8m 9d 

3y 10m 7d 
i yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 8m 9d 

ly 6m 18d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Died March, 190S. 

Died May 9, 1883. 

Died April, 1892. 

Died Somerset, Ky., March 5, 1862. 

Died Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 14, 1862. 

Died May 8, 1862. 

Holyoke, Colo. 

West LaFayette, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. O. 

July 25, 1865. Died Jan. 17, 1902. 
Veteran. Transferred to 5Sth Ind. Inf. JI. O. 

July 25. 1S65. Seeleyville, Ind. 
Killed at Chickamauga Sept. 19, 1863. 

West LaFayette, Ind. 

Fowler, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M, O. 

July 25, 1865. Insane Hospital, Washington, 

D. C. 
Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. M. 0. 

July 25, 1865. Otterbein, Ind. 



COMPANY E 




CAPTAIN LEWIS JOHNSON 



This company was organized in LaFayette, Tippecanoe 
County, Indiana, during the month of August, 1861, by William 
B. Carroll, Lewis Johnson and Joseph S. Lutz, and immediate- 
ly reported at "Camp Tippecanoe." The following officers 
were duly elected : 

Captain. 'William B. Carroll 
First Lieutenant, Lewis Johnson 
Second Lieutenant, Joseph S. Lutz 
With the regiment the company arrived at Indianapolis, 
September 17th and on the 18th was duly mustered into the 
United States service with 101 men. It received as recruits 
during the service 10 men ; making a total number of 1 1 1 men. 
During its three years service it sustained the following 
losses : 

Promoted 3 

Honorably discharged 1 

Killed in battle I 

Discharged on account of wounds 5 

Drowned 1 

Died from disease 11 

Discharged on account of disability 13 

Transferred to U. S. Signal Corps 3 

Transferred to 7th Indiana Battery 1 

Transferred to 58th Indiana Infantry. ... 14 

Deserted 7 

Mustered out September 19, 1864 51 

Total in 

Died since muster out, 63 ; living at present date, 26 ; un- 
known, 5. 




CORPORAL COLLINS BLACKMER 



86 ■ 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY E 



Tippecanoe County 






NAME AND RANK 



Capt. William B. Carroll- 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 2, 1861 



1st Lieut. Louis Johnson.-- Sept. 2, 1861 



2nd Lieut. Joseph S. Lutz— Sept. 2, 1861 
1st Sergt. Jasper N. Russell ; Sept. 18, 1861 
2nd Sergt. Wm. E. Ludlow— Sept. IS, 1861 
3rd Sergt. Jacob ShofstalL. Sept. 18, 1861 
4th Sergt. William R, Clark Sept. 18, 1861 

5th Sergt. Peter Hauler .Sept. 18, 1861 

1st Corpl. William Russ ;Sept. 18, 1861 

2nd Corpl. Chas. T. Clement Sept. 18, 1861 
3rd Cpl. Lewis A. Corcoran Sept. 18, 1861 
«h Corpl. Chas. A. Brewer__ Sept. 18, 1861 
5th Corpl. Seifert Alexander Sept. 18, 1861 
6th Cpl. Charles Diffenbaugh Sept. 18, 1861 
7th Corpl. Jacob Demerly_._ Sept. 18, 1861 

8th Corpl. John Heppahamer Sept. 18, 1861 
Drummer Allison Hawkins-- Sept. 18, 1861 
Piter White S. Walgemouth Sept. 18, 1861 
Wagoner William Washer.- Sept. 18, 1861 
Adkins. Elijah M. Sept. 18, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 15, 1864 



Dec. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Nov. 



1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1862 
1862 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounded at 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Disability 



Mill Springs, Ky. 

Jan. 19, 1862 

Corinth, Miss., 

May 21, 1862 

Nashville, Tenn., 

Dee. 7, 1864 



I 



Sept. 19, 1864 Exp. Service'. 



Sept. 
Sept. 



1864 
1864 



Sept. 
Peb. 



1861 
1862 



Exp. Service. 
Exp. Servicel. 



Exp. Service 
Disability 



Re-Enlisted in 



Regular Service 

1st Lt. 41st Inf. 

July 28, 1866 



Capt. Co. I 154th 
Ind. Inf. 



12th Battery Ind 
L. A. 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



3 yrs 13 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



ly 11m 3d 



2y 3m Id 

3 yrs. 1 day| 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 4m 7 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day;.— 

3 yrs. 1 day; 

3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 2m Id , 

ly 2m Id 

2y 11m 21d — - 

2 months 



3 yrs. 1 day 3m 10th: 
5m 11 days 
12 Ind. Bat. 
6m 24 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 



3 yrs. 1 dayj. 

5 months L 

3 yrs. 1 dayj- 

5m 21 days i. 



Total 
Service 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Promoted Maj. Aug. 11, '62. Promoted Lieut. 

I Col. Aug. 24, '62. Promoted Col. Nov. 18, '62. 
! Killed at Chiekamauga, Ga., Sept. 19, 1863. 
4y 11m 16d Captain and Major 25th U. S. Int. Retired 
Promoted Capt. Aug. 29, 1862. Promoted 
Col. 44th U. S. Inf. Sept. 16, 1864. Brevet 
Brig. Gen. Vols. Mar. 13, '65., meritorious serv- 
ice. Honorably M. 0. April 30, '66. Died 1901. 



2y 3m Id 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 4m 8d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 2m Id 
ly 21m Id 

2y 11m 21d 
2 months 

4 yrs 16 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

5 months 
3 yrs. 1 day 
5m 21 days 



Promoted 1st Lieut. Aug. 24, 1862. Died Sent. 

22, 1907. 
Promoted 2d Lieut. Aug. 24, 1862. Promoted 

1st Lieut. Dee. 4, 1863. Dead. 
Promoted Adjutant June 22, 1862. See Field 

and Staff. 
Appointed 1st Sergeant. Died Feb., 1901. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Reduced to Ranks. Dead. 

Appointed Sergt. 3439 15th Ave., S., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

Died at Marietta, Ga., Sept. 7, 1864. 

Deserted at Lebanon, Ky., Nov. 19, 1S61. Dead. 

M. O. 12th Batty. July 7, 1865. 1015 S. 18th St., 
LaFayette, Ind. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Died at Louisville, Ky., Feb. IS, 1862. 

Reduced to Ranks. Dead. 

Dead. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



87 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY E 



Tippecanoe County 



NAME AND RANK 



Adkins, William H. H 

Allen, James S. 

Anderson, Nelson D. _ 
Anderson, William W. 

Asbell, Charles S. 

Baker, Samuel W. — 

Barcus, Nelson S. 

Baer, Jenners 

Bareus, William J. ... 

Beman, Benjamin 

Bianehi, Lewis 

Blaekmer, Collins 

Booher, Daniel 

Bowers, Jacob 

Brainerd, James 

Broga, John 

Brown, Harrison 

Brown, William S 

Callow, Richard P. ... 

Calhoun, John W. 

Camard, John 

Clark, John H. 

Clement, Henry J, 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept. 
Sept 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Men. 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Dec. 



18, 18151 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
1, 1862 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
23, 1863 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 5, 1 
June 25, 1862 



Sept. 
Sept. 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 



June 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



25, 1862 

19, 1864 

19, 1S64 

19, 1S64 

15, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Transfer 
Disability 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Wounds 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 



Mill Springs, Ky., 
Jan. 19, 1862 



16th Battery Ind. 
L. A. 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



2y 11m 17d 
9m 7 days 



Co. B 150th Ind. 
Inf. 



Promot'd A. Q. M. 
44th U. S. Inf. 



11 months 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3m 18 days 

9m 7 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

6m 19 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 17d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly lm lid 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
'3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs.. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

7m 26 days 



In Other Or 
ganizations 



19m 20 days 
Sm 9 days 



13m 19 days 



Total 
Service 



3y 10m 7d 
ly 6m 16d 



11 months 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3m 18 days 

ly 3m 9d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

6m 19 days 

3y 3m 20d 



I 



3y 6m 23d 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly lm lid 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1' day 
m 26 days 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Veteran. Transferred to E 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1865. Unknown. 
M. O. 16th Batty. July 5, '65. LaFaycttc, Ind. 

Killed at Mill Springs, Ky., Jan. 19, 1862. 

Deserted at Dechard, Tenn., Aug. 18, 1862. 

Lathrop, Clinton Co., Ind. 
Arkansas City, Kans. 

Died at Soldiers' Home, Dayton, 0., 1879. 

Died at Lebanon, Ky., Jan. 5, 1862. 

Died Mar. 8, 1899. 

24 S. Hornan Ave., Chicago. 

Died at Louisville, Ky., April 6, 1862. 

Died Mar. 1, 1911. 

Recruit. Transferred to E 58th Ind. Promoted 
A. Q. M. 44th U. S. Inf. M. O. 1866. Dead. 
Dead. 

R. P. D. 9, Springfield, Mo. 

Deserted at Lebanon, Ky., Oct. 29, '62. Dead. 

Dead. 

Danville, 111. 

Appointed Corporal. Died Jan. 10, 1898. 

Dead. 

Wingate, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Died Mar. 5, 1911. 

Recruit. Died at Chattanooga, Tenn., Aug. 18, 
1864. 



Sf 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY E 



Tippecanoe County 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Collins, William W. Sept. IS, 1S6I 

Cummings, John E. Sept. IS, 1S61 

Daugherty, Michael Sept. IS, 1861 

Dillman John Sept. IS, 1861 

Dye, John E. Sept. 18, 1861 

Ellis, Thomas H. Sept. 18, 1861 

Ewing, William II. Sept. IS, 1861 

Felix, Lorenzo D. Sept. 18, 1861 

Eelton, George Sept. IS, 1861 

For, Gideon Sept. 18, 1861 

Goas, Asa F. Sept. 18, 1861 

Goodman, Jacob Sept. 18, 1861 

Harvey, John Sept. 18, 1861 

Harris, James M. llch. 12, 1864 

Hawk, Daniel Sept. 18, 1861 

Holliday, Andrew Sept. 18, 1861 

Holt, William Sept. 18, 1861 

Hunt, Edgar C. Mch. 1, 1862 

Hurley, Martin Sept. 18, 1861 

Jennings, Eli Sept. 18, 1861 

Jennings, Jasper N. _ Sept. 18, 1861 

Johnson, Thomas K. Sept. 18, 1861 

Johnson, Edwin W Feb. 15, 1862 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



•June 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



10, 186: 

19, 1864 

5, 1864 

19, 1S64 



Sept. 

Feb. 

June 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Oct. 



19, 1864 

15, 1862 

25, 1862 

19, 1864 

24, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 

19, 1864 

5, 1864 

22, 1863 

10, 1863 

19, 1864 



Sept. 
Mar. 



19, 1864 
4, 1863 



Nov. 19, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounded at 



Wounds 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service . 



Mill Springs, Ky. 
Jan. 19, 1862 



Exp. Service 
Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 



I 



Peach Tree Creek. 
Ga., July 20, 1864 



Exp. Service 
Disability 

Disability 
Transfer 



Tazwell, Tenn., 
Jan. 5, 1865 



Re Enlisted in 



Co. I Uth Ind. 
Cav. 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



16th Ind. Battery 



A 23d U. S. Inftv. 
Aug. 10, 1867 



1st Lt. & A. 0. S. 

2d N. O. Mtd. Inf. 

Nov. 1, 1862 



8m 23 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m lVd 
3 yrs. 1 day 

8m 4 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

4m 27 days 

9m 7 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 4m 6d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

5m 23 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 



10m 5 days 



3 yrs. 1 m 



3 years 



ly 4m 22d 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 7m 21d . 

11 months 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly lm 12d 

ly 2m Id 
2y 6m 20d 



3 yrs 28 days 



6m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Sm 23 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3y 10m 7d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
8m 4 days 
3y 10m 6d 
4m 27 days 
3y 10m 7d 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 4m Od 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3y 5m 23d 



ly 4m 22d 
3 yrs. 1 day 



11 months 
3 yrs. 2 days 
4y 2m lOd 

ly 2m Id 
3y lm lOd 



Dead. 

155 East Taylor, Kokoino, Ind. 

Veteran. Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf. 

Mustered Out July 25, 1S65. Dead. 
Soldiers' Home, LaFayette, Ind. 

Died at Corinth, Miss., May 22, 1862. 

Appointed Sergeant. Mustered Out 11th Cav. 

Sept. 19, 1865. Died July 5, 1911. 
Died Aug. 23, 1909. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

National Home, Marion, Ind. 

Died Jan. 23, 1893. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Recruit. Mustered Out Aug. 10, 1870. Dead. 

Appointed Sergeant. Transferred to U. S. 
Signal Corps Oct. 22, '63. Died April 30, '06. 
Died Feb. 30, 18S6. 

Appointed Corporal. Morehead, Kans. 

Recruit. Transferred to U. S. Signal Corps. 

Dead. 
Deserted at Dechard, Tenn., Aug. 18, 1862. 

Dead. 
Dead. 

Promoted Capt. P 2d N. C. Mtd. Inf to date. 
Nov. 1,'62. M. O. Aug. 16,'65. Died May 17,'ll. 



Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Inf. Mustered 
Out Mar. 25, 1S65. Died Nov. 23, 1S6S. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



8 9 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY E 



Tippecanoe County 



NAME AND BANK 



Jones, Elihu -_. 
Jones, Timothy 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. IS, 186] 
Sept. 18, 1801 



Kalberer, Louis Sept. 18, 1SC1 

Kreieheldorf, Henry Sept. 18, 1861 

Kurtz. Frank . Sept. 18, 1S61 

Lamb, Clark Sept. 18, 1861 

Lehmanoski, Sylvester Sept. 18, 1861 

Lewis, Samuel Sept. 18, 1861 

Mahin, Matthew __. Feb. 15, 1802 

MeFarlanrl, John W. Sept. 18, 1801 

Maekessey, John Sept. IS, 1801 

Marriott, Leon Sept. 18, 1861 

Mensehing, Lewis Dec. 22, 1863 

Mills. Noah W. Sept. IS, 1861 

Miller, Theo. H. Sept. IS, 1861 

Morgan, Win. H. Sept. 18, 1861 

Mulvine, Thos. P. Sept. 18, 1861 

Xeihart, Adam Sept. IS, 1861 

Noles, Wilson Sept. 18, 1861 

O'Bouk, Michael T. Sept. 18, 1801 

Packer, Andrew J. Mch. 6, 1802 

Payne, Hiram B. Sept. 18, 1801 

Payne, Milo Sept. 18, 1801 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19, 
Feb. 17, 
Sept. 19, 



June 23, 
Sept. 5, 
Oct. 22, 



1864 

1803 
1864 
1863 



Sept. 10, 
July 12, 



1864 
1862 



.Sept. 19, 1861 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 



1864 
1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 

Wounds 
Transfer 
Transfer 



Mis'n Bidge, Tenn. 
Nov. 25, 1803 



Mill Springs, Ky. 
Jan. 19, 1862 



Disability 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 



1864 
1864 



Feb. 20, 
Sept. 19, 



1863 
1864 



Sept. 5, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19. 



1864 
1864 
1804 



Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



F 5th Regt. Han 

cock's Vet. Corps, 

Mar. 5, 1865 



12th Battery Ind. 
L. A. Dec. 14, 1864 



Accidental 

Wounds 

Exp. Service 



Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 



On Picket Line, in 1. 
hand 



LENG1H UF SERVICE 



In Other Or- Total 
In lentil ganizations Service 



3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 4m 19d | ly 5m 3d 
3 yrs. 1 day, ly 3m 13d 

ly 0m 5d 

2y 11m 17d 10m 20 days 

2y lm 4d 

1 yr 25 days] 

3 yrs. 1 day] 

,4m 27 days | 

5m 7 days ' 



3 yrs. 1 day 3m 10th; 5m 

lid 12th Bat. 

7m 23 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 



8m 13 days 10m 20 day 
6m 28 days j 

3 yrs. 1 day]__ 
2y 11m 17d 10m 20 days 



1 year 4m 

ly 5111 lOd 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 5in 2d 
2y Om 3d 
2y 11m 17d 
3 yrs. 1 day 



3 yrs. 1 day 
3y 9m 22d 
4y 3m 14d 

ly 9m 5d 
3y 10m 7d 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



1 yr. 25 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
4m 27 days 
5m 7 days 
4y 1111 15d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 7m 3d 

6m 28 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 10m 17d 

1 year 4m 
ly 5ni lOd 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 5ni 2d 
3y 4m 23d 
3y 10m 17d 
3 yrs. 1 day 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Died Jan. 26, 1901. 

Transferred to 7th Ind. Battery. Mustered Out 

July 20, 1865. Unknown. 
Appointed Corporal. M. O. F 5th Regt. H. C. 

Mar. 25, 1806. Dead. 

Died Nov. 29, 1909. 

Veteran. Transferred to 5Stli Ind. Inf. M. O. 

July 25, 1805. Dead. 
Transferred to U. S. Signal Corns. 

Peoria, 111. 
Deserted at Danville, Ky., Oct. 13, 1802. Dead. 

Tab, Warren Co., Ind. 

Arkansas City, Kan. 

Died at Louisville, Ky., Feb. 25, 1862. 

M. O. 12th Battery July 7, 1865. 
Died Sept. 10, 1901. 

Died Mar. 25, 1S79. 

Recruit. Transferred to E 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Ind. July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Died at Nashville, Tenn., April 16, 1862. 

Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred to E 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1S05. Killed by O. & E. I. B. R. 

Sept. 21, 1909. 
Deserted at Duck Creek Jan. 14, '03. Unknown. 

Dead. 

Green Hill, Ind. 

Burned to Death at Bloomington, 111., "1883. 

Deserted at Indianapolis, Ind., Feb. 20, 1863. 
Recruit. Transferred to E 58th Ind. M. O. 

08th Ind. July 25, 1S65. Mulberry, Ind. 
Veteran. Transferred to E 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Ind. July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Dead. 



90 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY E 



Tippecanoe County 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Payne, William E. Sept. 

Pratt, Jeremiah E. „ — Sept. 

Reagan, William Sept. 

Reynolds, Singleton Sept. 

Ridenour, George Sept. 

Bisley, Reuben R. Sept. 

Ruby, William P. Sept. 

I 
Seldmiller, Valentine ISept. 

Sewell, Homer J Sept. 

Spring, Abner 'Sept. 

Stewart, John W. Sept. 

Stricht, Albert C Sept. 



18, 1861 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1S61 
18, 1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



June 25, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5 ; 



1862 
1864 
1864 
1864 



Wounded at 



1864 1 Exp. Service __ 

Exp. Service __ 

1864 Exp. Service! 

1864 Exp. Service.. 



Re Enlisted in 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Q. M. 154th Ind. 



Mis'n Ridge, Tenn. 
Nov. 25, 1863 



Tupper, James W Sept. 18, 1861 Sept. 5, 18641 Transfer 



Vaughn, William Sept. 18, 1861 June 25, 

Wallace, William j Sept. 18, 1861 Sept. 19, 

WatHns, Clement jSept. 18, 1861 Sept. 19, 

Watkins, Samuel 'Sept. 18, 1861 Sept. 19, 

Winkler, Henry Sept. 18, 1861 

Willis, Joseph I Sept. 18, 1861 Feb. 7, 

Whealan, Joseph Mch. 8, 1862, Sept. 5, 

Woodworth, Albert F. Dec. 23, 1863 Sept. 5, 

Young, Henry — 1 Sept. 18, 1861 ! Sept. 19, 



1862 
1864 
1864 
1864 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Mill Springs, 
Jan. 19, 1862 



1863 Disability 

1864 Transfer 
1864 'Transfer 
1864 Exp. Service 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



11m 28 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 7m 2d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 11m 25d 

9m 7 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 17d 10m 20 days 



4m 19 days 



2y 11m 17d 

9m 7 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 11m 28d 

ly 4m 20d 
2y 6m 3d 

8m 13 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 



10m 20 days 



6m 2 days 
10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



11m 28 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly 7m 2d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3y 4m 20d 
ly 11m 25d 
9m 7 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3y 10m 17d 

3y 10m 17d 

9m 7 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 11m 2Sd 
ly 4m 20d 
3 yrs. 5 days 

ly 7m 3d 
3 yrs. 1 day 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Died at Nashville, Tcnn., Sept. 16, 1862. 

Dead. 

Died at Stewart's Creek, Tenn., April 20, 1863. 

Appointed Corpl. Woodland, Yolo Co., Oal. 

Black Springs, Ark. 

Appointed Corporal. R. F. D. No. 2, 

St. Johns, Mich. 
ADpointed Commissary Sergeant. See N. C. 

Staff. Mustered Out Aug. 14, 1865. 
Died of poison at Bridgeport, Ala. Sept. 5, '63. 

Covington, Ind. 

Dead. 

Battle Ground, Ind. 

Veteran. Transferred to E 58th Ind. M. O. 

5Sth Ind. Julv 25, 1865. 708 East 7th St., 

Oklahoma, Okl.i. 
Veteran. Transferred to E 58th Ind. Taken 

Prisoner at Cataba River, S. C, Mar., 1865. 

M. 0. 58th July 25, 1865. Dead. 
LaFayette, Ind. 

Dead. 

Died Jan. 27, 1893. 

LaFayette, Ind. 

Drowned in Tenn. River at Battle Creek, Tenn., 

Sept. 2, 1S63. 
Dead. 

Recruit. Transferred to E 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Mar. 7, 1S65. Died Aug. 24, 1S95. 
Recruit. Transferred to E 5Sth Ind. M. O. 

58th Julv 25, 1865. Died LaFayette, Ind., 1877. 
Died Julv 14, 190L __ 



COMPANY F 



The above mentioned company was recruited at Zionsville, 
Boone County, Indiana, during the months of July and August, 
1861, by Benjamin M. Gregory and Henry D. McCoy. The 
company reported at "Camp Tippecanoe,'' LaFayette, about 
September 1st, with the following officers, who were commis- 
sioned by Governor Morton, September 2, 1861 : 

Captain, Benjamin M. Gregory 
First Lieutenant, Henry D. McCoy 
Second Lieutenant, Israel H. Miller 

Upon arrival of the regiment at Indianapolis, Company F 
was mustered into the United States service September 18, 
1861, with 101 men. It received during its term of service 16 
recruits, making a total of 117 men in the company. The losses 
sustained by this company during its term of service, are as 
follows : 



Killed in battle 9 

Died of wounds 3 

Died from disease 7 

Discharged on account of wounds 1 

Promoted 2 

Discharged on account of disability 27 

Transferred to 7th Indiana Battery 1 

Transferred to V. R. C 1 

Dismissed from the service 1 

Deserted 6 

Transferred to 58th Indiana Infantry. . .25 
Mustered out September 19. 1864 34 



117 



Died since the war, 51 ; living, 2,7', unknown, 4. 
See Muster Roll for further information. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY F 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Capt. Benjamin M. Gregory 
1st Lieut. Henry D. McCoy— 

2d Lieut. Israel H. Miller 

1st Sergt. Samuel C. Vance__ 

2d Sergt. ffm. P. Larimore. 
8d Sergt. Lorenzo G. Tipton 
4th Sergt. James H. Harris 
5th Sergt. John H. Harden. 
1st Corpl. Elijah W. Clingler 
2d Corpl. John W. French. 
3d Corpl. David II. Hume. 
4th Corpl. Andrew J. Pock-. 
5th Corpl. Martin B. Hoover 

6th Corpl. John Hussey 

7th Corpl. Wm. P. Windiate 
4th Corpl. Christian DerolL. 
Drummer Jacob McCauley___ 
Trier William H. Pitzcr.. 
Wag'nr Jeremiah Washburn 

Adams, Samuel D. „ _ „ 

Abrams, Francis F. 

Avery, Samuel H. 

BaHou, Andrew J. 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Mar. 
Sept 
Sept 



2, 1861 
2, 1861 
2, 1861 

IS, 1861 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



July 13, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1S64 



April : 



Sept. 19, 1S64 
June 20, 1862 
Nov. 4, 1862 
Nov. 7, 1863 
Nov. 5, 1862 
Aug. 26, 1862 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Nov. 5, 1862 
April 30, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Resignation 
Exp. Service 



Chickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Exp. Service 

Disability 

Supernum'ry 

Disability 

Disability 

Disability 



Chickamauga, Ga. . 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Wounded at 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



Re-Enlisted in 



■ ol. 102.1 Ind. Inf. 
Maj. 135 Ind. Inf. 



Mill Springs, Ky.,|_. 
Jan. 19, '62, twice 



Mill Springs, Ky., 
Jan. 19, 1862 



Corinth, Miss., 
May, 1802 



In Tenth 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



10m 11 days 

3 yrs 17 days 

6m 5 days 

ly 7m 9d 

4m 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
9m 2 days 
ly lm 17d 
2y lm 20fl 
ly lm lSd 
11m 8 days 

2 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2 yrs. 1 day 
4m 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly lm 18d 
7m 12 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
6m 1 day 
2 yrs. 10 m 

1 yr. 14 days 



4m 12 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



14m 23 days 
3 yrs 17 days 
6m 5 days 



4m 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
9m 2 days 
ly lm 17d 
2y lm 20d 
ly lm lSil 
11m 8 days 

2 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2 yrs. 1 day 
4m 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 

ly lm lSd 
7m 12 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 4m 21d 
2 yrs. 10m 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Promoted Maj. May 20, 1862. Died July 15, '99. 
Promoted Captain May 20, 1862. Knoxville, la. 
Died at Nashville, Tenn., Mar. 7, 1862. 

Promoted 2d Lieut Mar. 10, 1862. Promoted 

1st Lieut May 20, 1862. Dismissed from 

service April 17, 1863. Dead. 
Kilcd at Battle of Mill Springs, Ky., Jan. 19, 

1862. 
Promoted 2d Lieut. May 20, 1862. Promoted 

1st Lieut April 28, 1863. Dead. 
Noblesville, Ind. 

Promoted Adjutant Aug. 25, 1862. Dead. 

Dead. 

Died March, 1906. 

Dead. 

Killed at Chickamauga Sept. 19, 1863. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. April 28, 1S63. Dead. 

Killed at Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 19, 1863. 

Died Somerset, Ky„ Feb. It, 1862. Wounds. 

Appointed Sergeant. Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Died April 28, 1892, aged 93 years. 

Carniel, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

5Sth July 25, 1865. Died Sept. 30, 1875. 
Killed at Kenesaw, Ga., July, 1864. 

Deserted at Lebanon, Ky., Oct. 2, 1S62. 
Unknown. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



93 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY F 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Barker, Benjamin __ 

Barker, Mablon 

Benson, Daniel S. .. 

Bennett, Mathew 

Bishop, John 

Bishop, Joseph 

Bishop, Jonathan — 
Bowman, Levi R. _. 
Bradburn, Henry ___ 
Bryant, Joseph M. _ 
Burgain, Albert S. _ 
Bussell, James S. _— 
Carson, William B. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Feb. 22, 
Oct. 23, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



Chastain, John A. F. Sept. 18, 

Conover, John S. .. — Sept. 18, 

Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



Corbin, Alfred D. 
Crane, John R. _. 
Crane, Silas B. ... 
Deshong, John ... 
Dodson, John — 



Draper, Asa P. ___ Sent. 18, 

Easterly, James Sept. 18, 

Essex, Irvine — Sept. 18, 



1862 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 

1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1S61 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Sept. 5, 
Sept. 5, 
April 5, 
Sept. 19, 
April 30, 



1864 
1864 
1863 
1864 
1862 



Transfer 
Transfer 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Disability 



Wounded at 



Re Enlisted in 



Sept. 19, 
April 30, 



1864 
1862 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 5, 

Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 10, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 
1864 



Exp. Service 
Disability 



Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 



1864! Exp. Service 
1864 Transfer 
1864 1 Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



1864 



June 26, 
Sept. 19, 



1862 
1864 



Disability 
Exp. Service 



Chickaniauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1803 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



7m 11 days 
ly 10m 13d 
6m 18 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 12 days 
6m 12 days 
4m 26 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 12 days 

1 yr. 14 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

2y 11m 17(1 
_2y 11m 17d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 11m 17d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
11 months 
2 yrs. 10m 
3 yrs. 1 day 
2 yrs. Sm 

2 yrs. 1 day 



In Other Or 
ganizations 



6m 23 days 
10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



ly 2m 3d 
2y 9m 3d 



3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 12 days 
6m 12 days 
4m 26 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 12 days 

1 yr. 14 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 10m 7d 
3y 10m 7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 10m 7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

11 months 

2 yrs. 10m 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2 yrs. 8m 

2 yrs. 1 day 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Ind. Mar. 28, 1865. Fowler, Ind. 
Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Ind. July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Jamesport, Davies Co., Mo. 

Elk Falls, Kans. 

Died at Somerset, Ky. 

Died at Louisville, Ky., Mar. 30, 1862. 

Died at Mill Springs, Ky., Feb. 14, 1862. 

Appointed Corporal. Howard Lake, Minn. 

Mtmcie, Ind. 

Deserted at Lebanon, Ky., Oct. 2, 1862. 

Unknown. 
Appointed Sergeant. Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 
58th Ind. July 25, 1865. Zionsville, Ind. 

Veteran. Missing in action July 9, '64. Trans- 
ferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 58th July 25, 
1865. Dead. 

2050 Hazel St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Veteran. Transferred to 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1865. Died Dec. 15, 1892. 
Unknown. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

Zionsvilc, Ind. 

Deserted Nashville Aug. 18, 1862. Unknown. 

Appointed Corporal. Killed at Atlanta, Ga., 

1864. 
Peace Creek, Kans. 

Killed at Resaea, Ga., May 15, 1864. 

Killed at Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 19, 1863. 



94 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY F 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Essex, George P. L Sept. 18, 1861 

Esses, Thomas J. Eeb. 25, 1864 

Fender, Frederick Sept. 18, 1861 

Flannagan, James E. Sept. 18, 1861 

Floyd, Willis Sept. 18, 1861 

Floyd, James Sept. IS, 1S61 

Fouts, David E. Sept. 18, 1861 

Frits, Epbriam Sept. 18, 1861 

Glidewell, John F Sept. 18, 1861 

Grist, John Sept. 18, 1861 

Gray, Gilbert Feb. 22, 1862 

Grist, Solomon Feb. 17, 1864 

Hancock, James Sept. 18, 1861 

Hunt, John W. Feb. 22, 1862 

Harmon, John S. Sept. 18, 1861 

Harshbarger, Sam'l S. Sept. 18, 1861 

Hogan, Alexander P Feb. 25, 1864 

Hoover, John L Sept. 18, 1861 

Hollingsworth, Dan Sept. 18, 1861 

Howard, Doctor S. Sept. 18, 1861 

Hnnt, William A Sept. 18, 1861 

Imbier, George Sept. 18,1861 

Jewell, William M. 'Feb. 22, 1862 

j 
Johnson, William K Sept. 18, 1861 



Entry into 
the Service 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



April 5, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



July 3, 1862 
May 7, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
April 30, 1862 



Jan. 4, 1S64 
Sept. 5, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounds 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Mill Springs, Ky., 
Jan. 19, 1S62 



Re-Enlisted in 



Chickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Disability 

Disability Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 

Exp. Service Mis'n Ridge, Tenn. 
Nov. 25, 1863 

Disability 



Disability 
Transfer 



Sept. 5, 1864 Transfer 



jChickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Sept. 5, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
May 1, 1864 
Aug. 1, 1862 



Sept. 5, 1864 



Exp. Service 

Transfer 

Transfer 

Exp. Service 

Transfer 

Disability 



Chickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 186S 



Mill Springs, Ky., . 
Jan. 19, 1862 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 

6m 17 days 
6m 11 days 
i yrs. 1 day 

2 yrs. 2 days 
9m 15 days 
7m 19 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 12 days 



2y 4m 16d 
6m 18 days 
6m 21 days 
11 months 
6m 9 days 



In Other Or 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



6m 17 days 

ly 5m Id 

3 yrs. 1 day 

2 yrs. 2 days 
9m 15 days 
7m 19 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
7m 12 days 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



2y 4m 16d 
6m 18 days 
6m 21 days 
11 months 
6m 23 days ly lm 2d 



Chickamauga, Ga. Co. H 149th Ind. 
Sept. 19, 1863 Inf. 

Mill Springs, Ky., 

Jan. 19, 1862 

Atlanta, Ga., 

Aug., 1864 



3 yrs. 1 day, * 

6m 7 days iiom 20 days 
2y 11m 17d 10m 20 days 

3 yrs. 1 dayi 

2y 7m 13d j 

10m 13 days 



2y 11m 14d 
6m 9 days 
ly fim 20d 



6m 23 days 



3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 4m 27d 
3y 10m 7d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 7m 13d 

10m 13 days 
2y 11m 14d 
ly lm 2d 
ly 6m 20d 



Arm amputated. Died Sept. 5, 1909. 

Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. 0. 

5Sth July 25, 1865. Burlington, Kans. 
Appointed Sergeant. Dead. 

Kiled at Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 20, 1863. 

Dead. 

Wbitestown, Ind. 

Zionsville, Ind. 

Dead. 

Deserted from hospital Louisville, Ky. Died 

Jan. 29, 1902. 
Appointed Corporal. Died Dec. 1, 1891. 

Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Mar. 28, 1865. Oarmel, Ind. 
Recruit. Transferred to P 5Sth Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Died at Huntsville, Ala., Aug. 18, 1862. 

Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. 0. 

58th Mar. 28, 1865. Dead. 
Deserted Hospital Bowling Green, Ky. 

Unknown. 
Dead. 

Recruit. Transferred to F 5Sth Ind. M. 0. 

July 25, 1865. Rosston, Ind. 
Veteran. Transferred to P 5Sth Ind. M. O. 

July 25, 1S65. Dead. 
Died 1903. 

Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. M. O. 

Sept. 20, 1S64. Rockville, Ind. 
Dead. 

Died at Marietta, Ga., Sept. 1, 1864. Wounds. 

Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. II. 0. 

58th Ind. Mar. 2S, 1S65. Dead. 
Died at Stewarts Creek, Tenn.. April S, 1865. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



95 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY F 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Job, LaFayette J. 
Landers, William H. 
Lakin, William M. __ 
Laugblin, Thomas J. 



Lee, George W. 

Lee, John H. 

Lee, William H. 

Lee, Rinelder 

Lee, William P. 

Laughrum, Noah _„_ 

Long, William T. 

Mark, Lewis H. 

McClelland, Sam'] J. 
McGuire, William M. 

Moore, John M. 

Morgison, Peyton M. 
Medsker, John 



Nichols, Francis F. Sept. 18, 1861 

Nichols, Albert M. Sept. 18, 1861 



Nichols, Andrew B. 

Nowning, John 

Perkins, Patrick Y. 
Pock, John A. 



Kntry into 
the Service 



Feb. 17, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 

Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Feb. 17, 



1661 
1861 
1861 

1861 L 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 5, 1864 
Feb. 14, 1864 
April 4, 1882 
Sept. 19, 1864 



1861 Sept. 
1861 Sept. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 



" 



Feb. 22, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 



1864 
. 1864 

1862 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Aug. 29, 
Sept. 5, 
June 24, 
July 11, 



1864 
1864 
1862 
1864 
1862 
1863 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Transfer 
Transfer 
Disability 
Exp. Service 



Transfer 
Transfer 
Disability 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Disability 

Transfer 

Disability 

Disability 



I 



Sept. 5, 1864 Transfer 



Jan. 1, 1864 



Feb. 9, 1 
Sept. 19, 1884 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Disability 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



Wounded at 



Mill Springs, Ky.. 

Jan. 19, 1862 

Corinth, Miss., 

May, 1862 



Re-Enlisted in 



In Tenth 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 20, 1863 



Chickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Marietta, Ga., 

Sept. 2, 1864 

Mill Springs, Ky. 

Jan. 19, 1862 



F 10th Inf. Mar. 
4, 1864 



F 10th Inf. Mar. 
4, 1864 



4th Ind Battery 



6m 13 days 
2y 4m 27d 
6m 17 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 

4m 1 day 
2y 11m 17d 
2y Urn 17d 
ly 7m Id 
6m 15 days 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
11m 11 days 
2y 11m 17d 
9m 6 days 
ly 9m 23d 

2 yrs 20 days 
6m 16 days 

2y 3m 14d 
6m 24 days 
1 yr. 11 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



6m 19 days ly lm 2d 
ly 5m 6d 3y 10m 3d 

j 6m 17 days 

! 3 yrs. 1 day 



5m 4 days 
10m 20 days 



4m 1 day 
3y 4m 21d 
3y 10m 7d 



10m 20 days 2y 5m 21d 

! 6m 15 days 

1 3 yrs. 1 da: 

3 yrs. 1 day 

11m 11 days 

10m 20 days 3y 10m 7d 
10m 20 days j ly 7m 26d 
ly 9m 23d 
2 yrs 20 days 
9m 20 days ly 4m 6d 

2y 3m 24d 

6m 24 days 

1 yr. 11 days 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 



I 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

5Sth Mar. 17, 1865. Disability. Dead. 
Transferred to 7th Ind. Batty. M. O. 7th 

Batty. July 20, 1S65. Whitestown, Ind. 
Dead. 

Dead. 



Killed at Mill Springs, Ky„ Jan. 19, 1862. 

Veteran. Transferred to F 58th Ind. Died at 

Savannah, Ga,, Feb. 9, 1865. 
Veteran. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

5Sth July 25, 1865. NatT Home, Marion, Ind. 
Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

5Sth July 25, 1865. Zionsville, Ind. 
Died at Nashville, Tenn., April 2, 1862. 

Died April 5, 1907. 

Coffeyville, Kans. 

Osborne City, Kans. 

Veteran. Transferred to P 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1S65. Dead. 
Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th Ind. July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Died Aug. 11, 1908. 

Died at Chattanooga, Tenn., Oct. 8, 1863. 
Wounds. 

Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 
58th June 25, 1865. Cor. Jefferson and Wash- 
ington Sts., Indianapolis, Ind. 

626 Prospect St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Died at Zionsville, Ind., April 11, 1862. 

Recruit. 1415 Vigo St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 



96 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER TNFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY F 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Entry into 
the Service 



Reis, Mathew 

Sheets, Allen 

Smith, Isaac E. 

Stephens, John H. 

Stoneking, Nelson J. __. 

Sweeney, SamT B. 

Thomas, James S. 

Thomas, George W. 

Vance, William C. 

Watts, John E. 

Watts, Ezra 

Watts, Aaron H. 

Weber, George L. 

Wicker, James F. 

Wicker, George W. — 

Wilson, Samuel S. Sept. 

Wilson, William H. Sept. 

Wood, Albert I Sept. 

Wood, William H. (Sept. 

Wood, James S. _ Sept. 

Zimerle, Amos B. |Sept. 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



18, 16(51 Sept. 
18, 1661 Sept. 
IS, lSGlSeot. 



Sept. 
Mar. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



18, 1661 
18, 1861 
20, 1862 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 Mar. 
18, 1861! Sept. 

! 

18, 1861 Sept. 
18, 1861 1 Sept. 
IS, 1861 ! Aug. 
18, 1S61 



10, 1661 
19, 1861 
19, 1861 
19, 1861 

3, 1863 
5, 1861 

19, 1861 
30, 1863 
19, 1861 
19, 1861 
19, 1861 

4, 1862 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounded at 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1S6.3 

Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1663 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 

Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 10, 1863 

Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



I" 



.1. 



18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 



April 
Mar. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



4, 1862 
29, 1862 

5, 1864 
10, 1864 
■ 5, 1864 



Sept. 
Sept. 



19, 1861 
5, 1864 



Disability 
Disability 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Exp. ServiceiChickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 20, 1863 

Transfer Arm amputated 

from impure vac 
| cination, 1863 



Re-Enlisted in 



F 10th Inftry 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 5m 13d 
2y 7m 16d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 6m 12d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
yrs. 1 day 
B yrs. 1 day 
10m 17 days 



6m 17 days 
em 11 days 
2y 11m 17d 

3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 11m 17d 
4m 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 
2y 11m 17 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 5m 13d 
3y 1m Id 
3 yrs. 1 day 
ly 6m 12d 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 
3 yrs. 1 day 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



6m 17 days 
6m 11 days 
3y 10m 7d 



3y 10m 7d 

4m 1 day 

3 yrs. 1 day 

3y 10m 7d 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Nceleysville, Butler Co., Mo. 

Appointed Corporal. Dead. 

Dead. 

849 S. Carpenter St., Chicago, 111. 

Dead. 

Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th May 13, 1865. Died Mar. 25, 1900. 
Appointed Sergeant. Dead. 

Bringhurst, Ind. 

Appointed Sergeant. Noblesville, Ind. 

Di'ad. 

Fortville, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 
58th July 25, 1865. 1131 Eugene St., Indpls. 
Deserted from Hospital Danville, Ky. Dead. 

Dead. 

Westfleld, Ind. 

Veteran. Appointed Corporal. Transferred to 

F 58th Ind. M. O. 58th July 25, 1865. Dead. 
Tonganoxie, Kans. 

Veteran. Transferred to F 58th Ind. M. O. 

58th July 25, 1805. Dead. 
Killed at Mill Springs, Ky., Jan. 19, 1662. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

Veteran. Appointed Corporal. Transferred to 
F 58th Tnd. M. O. 5Sth July 25, 1S65. Dead. 



COMPANY G 



This company was recruited in the counties of Fountain, 
Warren and Tippecanoe, by Alexander Hogeland and Jacob 
H. Bush. Upon arrival at LaFayette the two detachments were 
consolidated and the following officers elected : 

Captain, Alexander Hogeland 
First Lieutenant, Jacob H. Bush 
Second Lieutenant, John Stahl 
First Sergeant, William Virgin 

Upon its arrival at Indianapolis it was mustered into the 
United States service with 96 men. During its term of service 
it received as recruits 16 men, making a total of 112 men in 
the company during its term of service. The losses sustained 
bv this company during its term of service were as follows: 



Resigned 2 

Promoted 1 

Killed hi battle 1 

Died from wounds 2 

Died from disease 9 

Taken prisoner 1 

Discharged on account of wounds 3 

Discharged on account of disability 2$ 

Transferred to V. R. C 8 

Transferred to Company B 1 

Transferred to 58th Indiana Infantry. ... 12 

Deserted 4 

Mustered out September 19, 1864 45 

Total 112 

Died since the war, 51; living, 41; unknown, 7. See 
Muster Roll. 



9 8 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY G 



Fountain County 



NAME AND RANK 



Capt. Alexander Hogeland_- 

lst Lieut. Jacob Bush 

2r Lieut John Stahl 

1st Sergt. William Virgin 

2d Sergt. George W. Beach-- 
3d Sergt James W. Elliott-- 

4th Sergt. George Crapp 

5th Sergt. Joseph Berquin_-_ 
lst Corpl. Charles W. Hill— 

2d Corpl. Robert S. Miner 

3d Corpl. Henry Burkhalter_ 
4th Corpl. Edmund B. Slade. 

5th Corpl. Alired Smith 

6th Corpl. James A. Gerard__ 

Corpl. Charles Shaw 

Corpl. Mahlon Cleaver 

Musician Seth Thomas 

Mus'n Christop'r C. Newman 

Wagoner Reuben Steeley 

Anderson, Smith 

Baker, Josiah 

Baker, Samuel 

Earnhardt, Barron B. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 2, 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Feb. 13, 
Aug. 27, 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



April 2, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
June 14, 1864 
Nov. 2, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Mar. 25, 1864 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 

1861 Sept. 19, 1864 
1861 Sept. 19, 1864 
'61 Sept. 19, 1864 
1861IMar. 19, 186: 
1861 1 Sept. 19, 1864 
1861 Sept. 19, 1864 
1861 Sept. 19, 1864 
1861 .Sept. 19, 1864 
1861 Aug. 26, 1862 
1861; April 15, 1882 
1861 Sept. 5, 1864 
1861 Dec. 31, 1862 
1861 Sept. 19, 1864 

1861 Sept. 19, 1864 
1862, Aprl 30, 1864 

1862 Feb. 21, 1863 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Resignation 
Exp. Service 
Wounds 
Resignation 
Exp. Service 
Promotion 



Wounded at 



Chiekamauga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Re-Enlisted in 



Appointed Colonel 
8th Tcnn. Infty. 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Disability 
Veteran 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Disability 



Co. E 9th Rcgt. 
Hancock's V. Cor. 



Chiekamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



7 months 

3 yrs 17 days 

2y 6m 12d 

ly 2m 2d 

3 years 
2y 6m 6d 

2 years 

3 years 
3 years 
3 years 

r, months 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

11m 7 days 

6m 27 days 

2y 11m 17d 

ly 3m 12d 

3 years 

3 years 

2y 2m 17d 

6m 24 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



3 yrs 17 days 
2y 6m 12d 



1 year 6m 



5m 17 days 


1 year 















10m 20 days 






9m 13 days 



4 yrs. 6 days 

2 years 
3y 5m 17d 

3 years 

4 years 
6 months 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years, 

11m 7 days 

6m 27 days 

3y 9m 20d 

ly 3m 12d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

6m 24 days 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Died June IS, 1907. 

Promoted Captain April 2, '62. Died Nov. 8, '04. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. Dead. 

In Cahaba Prison. Explosion of "Sultana" 

April 27, 1865. Died 1895. 
Killed at Chiekamauga, Ga., Sept. 19, 1863. 

Mustered Out 154th Ind. Aug. 4, 1865. Died 

Oct. 23, 1904. 
Reduced. Rossville, Ind. 

Promoted 1st Sergt. 810 S. 8th St., San Jose, 

Santa Clara Co., Cal. 
Dead. 

Reduced. Holton, Jackson Co., Kans. 

415 Vine St., West Lafayette, Ind. 

Reduced. Dead. 

Promoted Sergeant. Dead. 

Died July 31, 1SS5. 

Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred to Co. G 5Sth Ind. Inf. 
Mustered Out July 25, 1865. Lafayette, Ind. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

Died April 19, 190S. 

Recruit. Transferred to V. R. C. April 30, 1864. 

Laeynge, Kans. 
Recruit. 2222 Ohio St., Lincoln, Neb. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



99 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY G 



Fountain County 





Entry into 
the Service 


Discharge 
from the 
Service 

Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 






Re-Enlisted in 


LENGTH OF SERVICE 




NAME AND RANK 


Cause of _ , , , 
Discharge Wounded at 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 




Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Aug. 28, 1862 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 






3 years 
3 years 




3 years 
3 years 






















Transferred to V. R. C. Died Insane Asylum, 
1886. 












6m 9 days 

3 years 

ly 3m 25d 

10m 18 days 

10m 18 days 

3 years 




6m 9 days 

3 years 

2y llm 16d 

10m 18 days 

10m 18 days 

3 years 




Sept. 19, 1864 
Jan. 14, 1863 
Aug. 7, 1862 
Aug. 7, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
1862 
Dec. 2, 1862 


Exp. Service 

Disability 

Disability 

Disability 

Exp. Service 

Disability 

Disability 








Sigourney, Iowa. 






10th Ind. Battery 
Nov. 10, 1863 


ly 7m 21d 


Brady, William S. _ 
















Cadq, Harrison _. _ ___ _. 








Dead. 


Cleaver, William P. 




2d Lieut. 116th 
Ind. Inf. 


6m 13 days 


Burlington, Ind. 






2m 4 days 
















Died Bardstown, Ky., Feb. 27, 1862. 


Orook, Enoch 


Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. IS, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1861 
Sept. 19. 1861 


Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Dec. 2, 1862 

Sept 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Mar. 1, 1862 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Veteran 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 

Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 

Desertion 






3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

2y 11m 17d 

3 years 

3 years 

ly 2m 14d 

2r 2m 7d 

3 years 

3 years 

6m 12 days 

8m 18 days 




3 years 
3 years 
3 years 
3y 9m 20d 
3 years 
3 years 




Daily, William 








Cal. 
Died Jan. 9, 1907. 


Davis, James _ _ .-_ ._ 


Chickamauga, Ga. 








Dawson, Benj. C. H. 




10m 20 days 


Promoted Corporal. Veteran. Transferred to 


Diebert, Simon ._ 






Co. G 58th Ind. Inf. Dead. 
Promoted Corporal. Mulberry, Clinton Co., 


Doty, Columbus . 1 








Ind. 
Promoted Corporal. Tryon, Lincoln Co., Okla. 


Doty, Edward 








Died May 5, 1909. 


Duncan, John _ __! 








7y 2m 7d 

3 years 

3 years 

6m 12 days 

8m 18 days 


Died New Albany, Ind., Nov. 26, 1863. 


Elliott, James H. 




R. R. 2, Madison, Ind. 


Elliott, John L. _.. 








Promoted Sergeant. Died Aug. 18, 1903. 


Fisher, Andrew ___ ; 








Deserter. Unknown. 


Fowler, Rowland _ < 






Died Corinth, Miss., June 7, 1862. 



100 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY G 



Fountain County 



-NAME AND RANK 



Gage, Amasa 

Gangwer George 

Garver, Frank 

Gerard, Jesse 

Gillin, John 

Goodwin, William H. H._ 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Mar. 1, 
Aug. S, 
Sept. 19, 
Gwin, James .. j Dec. 10, 



Entry into 
the Service 



Hanson, Daniel P. _— 

Hart, Tobias 

Henderson, George H. 

Henderson, John 

Himrnelwright, John . 

Holcomb William 

Hopkins, James 

James, William 

Kerns, Harrison 

Knapp, Morris 

Lawrie, John 

Lee, John 

Lemons, Wesley 

Lewis, Stephen D. 

Lucas, Aaron 

llalloy, John 

Maxville, James 



Sept. IS, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
liar. 11, 
Sept. 18, 
Oct. 21, 
Sept. 18, 
Nov. 28, 
Sent. 18. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1863 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 5, 1864 
Nov. 27, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Mar. 2, 1865 
Jan. 27, 1865 
Sept. 19, 1864 
April 30, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1862 
Dec. 31, 1863 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
June 12, 1S62 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
April 1, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
April 1, 1863 



Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 7, 1862 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Veteran 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Close War 



Wounded at 



Exp. Service 

Transfer 

Disability 

Disability 

Veteran 

Exp. Service 

Disability 

Exp. Service 

Veteran 



Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Disability 



Transfer 
Disability 



Chickamauga, Ga 



Mill Springs, Kv.. 
Jan. 19, 1862 



Peach Tree Creek 
Ga. 



Re Enlisted in 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



2y 11m 17d 

2y lm 8d 

3 years 

2 years 
2y 5m 19d 

3 years 
2y 3m 20d 

1 year 
2y 3m 12d 
2y 11m 17d 

3 years 
9m 13 days 

3 years 
2y 11m 17d 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 
10m 17 days 



1 year 



9m 10 days 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



3y 9m 20d 

2y 11m 25d 

~3 years 

3 years 



3 years 
3 years 
1 year 

2y 3m 12d 

3y 9m 20d 
3 years 

9m 13 days 
3 years 

3y 9m 20d 



3 years 

5 months 

3 years 

21 days 

3 years 

ly 5m lOd 

3m 13 days 

10m 7 days 

11m 20 days 



10m 20 day: 



3 years 



3 years 4m 
21 days 
3 years 
ly 5m lOd 
3m 13 days 
ly 8m 27d 
11m 20 days 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Promoted Corporal. Veteran. Transferred to 
Co. G 58th Ind. Inf. Fredonia, Iowa. 

Mustered Out V. R. C. Oct. 14, 1894. Trans- 
ferred to V.R.C. Nov. 27, '63. Mulberry, Ind. 

Dead. 

Recruit. Transferred to V. R. C. Dead. 

Recruit. Captured at Chickamauga. 

Wellington, 111. 
E. R. 25, Chrisman, 111. 

Recruit. Transferred to V. R. C. Dead. 

Dead. 

Williamsport, Ind. 

Mustered Out July 25, 1865. Veteran. Trans- 
ferred to G 58th Ind. Sheridan, 111. 
Unknown. 

853 East McCraeken Ave., Hoopeston, 111. 

Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred to Co. G 58th Ind. Inf. 

National Military Home, Danville, 111. 
Transferred to V. R. C. Died July 23, 1S9S. 

Died Aug. 17, 1910. 

Died Lebanon, Ky., Feb. 15, 1862. 

Transferrei to Co. B. 

Recruit. Died Jan. 24, 1902. 

Died 1902. 

Recruit. Monticello, Piatt Co., 111. 

Deserted at Lebanon Ky., Jan. 1, 1S62. 

Unknown. 
Recruit. Transferred to G 5Sth Ind. 

Emporia, Kans. 
Dead. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



IOl 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY G 



Fountain County 



NAME AND RANK 



McCarthy, Aris 

McCoy, John 

McL'lateher, Daniel . 

Miller, Cyrus 

Miller, John G. 

Mills, James 

Mitzler, George 

Morgan, John W. _. 

Morris, Joseph 

Mozier, John W. __. 

Musgrove, Isaac 

Myers, Walter S. ... 
Hiroth, W. H. H. ... 

O'Neal, Timothy 

Phebus, John W. ... 

Powell, John A. 

Powell, William 

Pricbett, Francis M. 
Rakestraw, Chas. W 
Reynolds, Chas. A. . 

Reitz, Peter 

Rhodes, Thomas D. 

Roth, Cosmos 

Rockenfleld, Henry . 



Entry into 
the Service 



Mar. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Dee. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



1862 

1801 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1863 
1861 
1S61 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



June 15, 
April 8, 
June 13, 
Sept. 19, 



1863 
1862 
1863 
1864 



Jan. 21, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 



Sept. 19, 1S64 



Dee. 31, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 26, 



1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Disability 
Disability 



Wounded at 



I 



Exp. Service I 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 



Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Disability 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Mill Sprngs, Ky. 



Xulkihoma, Tenn. 



Re-Enlisted in 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



ly 4m 14d 

7m 21 days 

ly 10m 25d 

3 years 

19 days 

2y 2m 6d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

5m 6 days 

3 years 

5m 2 days 

2y 3m 13d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

8m 14 days 

1 yr. 8 days 



In Other Or 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 



3 years 
3 years 
1 yr. 20 days . 
3 years 
3 years 



Total 
Service 



ly 4m 14d 

7m 21 days 

ly 10m 25d 

3 years 

19 days 

2y 2m 6d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

5m (i days 

3 years 

5m 2 days 

2y 3m 13d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

ly 7m 4d 

1 yr. 8 days 



3 years 
3 years 
1 yr. 20 days 
3 years 
3 years 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 

Recruit. Dead. 

Unknown. 

Died Independence, Ind., June 13, 1863. 

Fallansbee, Brooks Co., W. Va. 

Died Bardstown, Ky., Oct. 6, 1861. 

521 Adams St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Died Feb. 24, 1862. 

Dead. 

Died Lebanon, Ky., Feb. 20, 1862. 

Died April 2, 1900. 

Died Sept. 27, 1897. 

Dead. 

R. R. 4, Lafayette, Ind. 

Recruit. Transferred to 1 G 58th Ind. 

Baker City, Baker Co., Oregon. 
Dead. 

Died at home. 

Appiinted Corporal. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Appointed Sergeant. Hoopeston, 111. 

Deserted at Bardstown, Ky., Oct. 8, 1862. 

Unknown. 
Died Dec. 28, 3906. 

Died Mar. 21, 1902. 



HISTORY 01? THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY G 



Fountain County 



NAME AND RANK 



Skillman, James 

Sprague, Jobn 

Smith, Ira 

Stroud, William 

Thomas, William H. 
Thompson, Joseph __ 

Timmons, Henry 

Timmons, Joseph H. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Dec. 

July 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



Trickey, William iSept. 



Truett, James O. — . 
Underhill, John A. _ 

Yankirk, Dryden 

Yansant, Oliver 

Williams, James H. 
Williams, John R. _. 
Wright, Ezdail P. _. 
Yundt, Joseph H. _. 
Yundt, Samuel 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Mar. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Aug. 



IS, 1861 
IS, 1S61 
19, 1863 
24, 1863 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
IS, 1861 
IS, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 

18, 1861 

19, 1861 
19, 1861 
10, 1864 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
28, 1862 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
June 
Mar. 
Sept. 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 
5, 1864 
5, 1864 
26, 1862 
19, 1862 
19, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



June 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



22, 1862 
31, 1862 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
5, 1864 
5, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
5, 1864 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Transfer 

Transfer 

Disability 

Disability 

Exp. Service 



Wounds 
Wounds 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Veteran 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 



Wounded at 



Mill Springs 



Mill Springs 
Mill Springs 



Chickamauga 



Re-Enlisted in 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3 years 
3 years 
8m 17 days 
ly 1m 12d 
9m 8 days 
6m 1 day 

3 years 
5m 16 days 

1 yr. 13 days 
9m 4 days 

11m 13 days 
3 years 
3 years 
2y 11m lVd 
5m 26 days 
3 years 
3 years 

2 yrs IT days 



In Other Or 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



10m 20 flays 
10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



3 years 

3 years 

ly 7m 7d 

2 yrs. 2 days 

9m 8 days 

6m 1 day 

3 years 

5m 10 days 

1 yr. 13 days 

9m 4 days 

11m 13 days 

3 years 

3 years 

3y 9m 20d 

ly 4m 16d 

3 years 

3 years 

2y 11m 7d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 

Unknown. 

R. R. 6, Canton, 111. 

Recruit. Transferred to G 58th Ind. Deac 

Recruit. Transferred to G 58th Ind. 

Pueblo, Colo. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

1216 E. Molino St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Died Lebanon, Ky., Feb. 28, 1862, wounds, 

Mill Springs, Ky. 
Deserted at Louisville, Ky., Dec. 1, 1S62. 

Williamsport, Ind. 
Dead. 

Medford, Grant Co., Okla. 

Coulstone, Texas Co., Mo. 

Sun Prairie, Dane Co., Wis. 

Veteran. Transferred to G 5Sth Ind. 

Harris, Adams Co., Colo. 
Recruit. Transferred to G 58th Ind. 

Portland, Ore. 
Dead. 

Tucson, Arizona. 

Appointed Sergeant. Galena, 111. 



COMPANY H 



This Company was recruited by Marsh B. Taylor and 
John C. Boswell during the months of August, 1861, and at 
once entered "Camp Tippecanoe."' 

The following officers are elected : 

Captain, Marsh B. Taylor 

First Lieutenant, John C. Boswell 

Second Lieutenant, Isaac Willitts 

Arriving at Indianapolis with the regiment it was mus- 
tered into the United States service September 18th, 1861, 
with go men; recruits received during term, 9 men; total, 99 
men. 

During its three years' service its losses were as follows : 

Promotion 3 

Resigned 1 

Killed in battle 3 



Taken prisoner 2 

Died of disease 13 

Discharged for disability 22 

Transferred to V. R. C 4 

Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf., Veterans. . 8 
Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf., Recruits. . 3 

Deserted 8 

Mustered out Sept. 19, 1864 32 



99 

Company H was assigned as the left Color Company. 
The Colors of any regiment was never better protected than 
by the Color Companies (C and H) of the 10th Indiana. 

Died since the war 50 

Living 23 

Unknown 3 



104 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY H 



Tippecanoe County 



NAME AND RANK 



Capt. Marsh B. Taylor. 



1st Lieut. John 0. BosivelL. Sept. 2, 1861 

2d Lieut. Isaac Willits Sept. 2, 1861 

1st Sergt. Patrick Brown Sept. 18, 1861 

2d Sergt. John HeMurtry Sept. 18, 1861 

Sd Sergt. John W. Scott— - 

4th Sgt. Theop. K. Harmon Sept. 18, 1861 

. Theo. W. Shigley. Sept. 18, 
1st Corpl. William F. Swan. Sept. 18, 1861 
2d Corpl. Samuel C. Fisher.. Sept. 18, 1861 

3d Corpl. James Swan Sept. 18, 1861 

4th Corpl. Samuel Briley J Sept. 18, 1861 

5th Corpl. Milton J. Swan— ; Sept. 18, 1861 

6th Corpl. Wesley Foster Sept. 18, 1861 

7th Corpl. David B. Dawson. Sept. 18, 1861 
8th Corpl. Graham N. Scott. Sept. 18, 1881 
Musician Geo. F. Marsteller. Sept. 18, 1861 

18, 1861 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 2, 1S61 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 20, 1864 



Sept. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

April 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



19, 1S64 

24, 1S62 

5, 1864 

19, 1864 

24, 1864 

3, 1862 

19, 1863 

19, 1864 



Musician Joseph B. Walker- 
Wagoner John McBride 

Akers, William 

Atchison, George 

Arthur, William jSept 

Beldon, James B. Sept 



Sept. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Sept 

Sept. 18, 1861 1 May 

Oct. 

Sept. 



2, 1861 
18, 1861 
18, 1861 
18. 1861 



July 
Sept. 
Sept, 
Feb. 



19, 1S64 
13, 1863 
19, 1864" 
25, 1862 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
10, 1862 

19, 1864 

20, 1862 
19, 1864 

5, 1864 
19, 1864 
24, 1863 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounded at 



Exp. Service . 

Exp. Service 

Resignation 

Veteran 

Exp. Service 

Disability 

Disability 

Prisoner 

Exp. Service 

Promotion 

Exp. Service 

Disability 

Exp. Service 

Disability 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Disability 



Veteran 
Exp. Service 
P'sability 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



Re-Enlisted in 



In Tenth 



Colonel 150th Ind. 3 vrs 17 days 
Inf. 



Captain Co. E 
150th Ind. Inf. 



Chickairnmga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Chiekamauga, Ga 



3 years 
1 yr. 26 days 
2y 11m 17d 

3 years 
2y 10m 6d 
ly lm lod 

2 years 

3 years 
ly 4m lOd 

3 years 
ly 10m 25d 
3 years 
T yr 7 days 
3 years 
3 years 



3 years 
8m 2 days 
2y 9m 17d 
2y 11m 17d 

3 years 
ly 4m Gd 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



3m 22 days 
10m 20 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



3y 3m 22d 
1 yr. 26 days 
3y 10m 7d 

3 years 
2y 10m fid 
ly lm 15d 

2 years 

3 years 
2y 4m 24d 

3 years 
ly 10m 25d 

3 years 

1 yr. 7 days 

3 years 

3 years 



3 years 
8m 2 days 
2y 9m 17d 
:iy 10m 7d 

3 years 
ly 4m 6d 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Promoted Maj. Aug. 16, '62. Promoted Lieut. 

Col. Nov. 18, '62. Promoted Col. Sept. 21, '63. 

Died July 20, 1879. See Field and Staff. 
Mustered Out June 24, 1805. Dead. 

Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred 58th Ind. Inf. Dead. 

Promoted 2d Lieut. Aug. 24, 1862. 

Wessington, S. D. 
Appointed 1st Sergt. Died Jan. 15, 1911. 

Rugby, Pierce Co., N. D. 

Captured Chiekamauga Sept. 19, 1863. 

Starved at Andersonville, Ga. 
Appointed 1st Sergt. Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Promoted Captain Co. 116th Ind. Dead. 

Appointed Sergt. Died May 6, 1907. 

Dead. 

Appointed Sergeant. Died Sept. 24, 1911. 

Green Hill, Ind. 

R. R. 1, Selden, Kans. 

Died June 1, 1889. 

Dead. 

152 East Market St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Kramer, Ind. 

Recruit. Died Kingston, Ga., July 19, 1864. 

Veteran. Transferred Co. H 5Sth Ind. Inf. 

Died May 22, 1911. 
122 Liberty St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Died Soldiers' Home Dayton, O. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



105 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY H 



Tippecanoe County 



NAME AND RANK 



Bottom, Edwar] 

Bemis, Marvin 

Bowley, James 

Campbell, Lowery — 
Carson, Ferguson D. 
Ohissom, James ___ 

Coffeen, Seth 

Cooney, John 

Cops, Nicholas 

Carroll, William __. 
Craft, Ferdinand I>. 
Cowk, Ferdinand ___ 

Cory. Jason 

Dota, Noah 

Derrick, Elisha 

Driscoll, John M. ___ 

Dickens, Jesse 

Derrin, James M. _._ 
Dewey, William J. __ 

Dewey, Erastus 

Davis, William J. __ 
Dillman, James T. _ 

Duffy, John C. 

Dickens, William ... 



Entry into 
the Service 


Sept 


18 


1861 


Sept 


18 


1861 


Sept 


18 


1861 


Sept 


18 


1861 


Oct. 


2 


1861 


Sept. 


18 


1861 


Sept 


18 


1861 


Sept 


22 


1861 


Oct. 


2 


1861 


Sept. 


22, 


1861 


Sept 


18, 


1861 


Sept 


18, 


1861 


Dec. 


10, 


1861 


Sept 


18, 


1861 


Sept. 


18, 


1861 


Sept. 


21, 


1861 


Sept. 


21, 


1861 


Sept. 


22 


1861 


Sept. 


18, 


1861 


Sept. 


18, 


1861 


Sept. 


18, 


1861 


Sept. 


18, 


1861 


Sept. 


18, 


1861 


Sept. 


18, 


1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



May 23, 1862 
Sept. 3, 1863 
April 20, 1863 
Mar. 17, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1863 
Oct. 31, 1862 
Oct. 13, 1863 
June 24, 1863 
April 30, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 10, 1862 
Feb. 22, 1862 
Jan. 19, 1862 
Nov. 13, 1863 
July 15, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Oct. 22, 1861 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Jan. 19, 1862 
Jan. 22, 1862 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Dec. 16, 1862 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Transfer 
Disability 



Disability 
Disability 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 



Disability 



Exp. Service 
Disability 



Wounded at 



Re Enlisted in 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



8m a days 
ly 11m 16d 
ly 7m 2d 
6 months 
2y 11m 3d 

2 years 
ly lm 12d 

1 yr. 22 days 
ly 8m 22d 
2y 7m 8d 

3 years 
11m 23 days 

2m 12 days 

4m 1 day 

2y lm '26d 

ly 9m 24d 

3 years 

1 month 

3 years 

4 months 

3m 4 days 

3m 7 days 

3 years 
ly 3m 28d 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



days 



ly 2m 7d 



8m 5 days 
ly 11m 16d 
ly 7m 2d 
6 months 
3 yrs. lm 
2 years 



1 yr. 22 days 

ly 8m 22d 
3 years 

. 3 years 
11m 23 days 

2m 12 days 
4m 1 day 

2y lm 20d 
3 years 
3 years 
1 month 
3 years 
4 months 

3m 4 days 

3m 7 days 
3 years 

ly 3m 28d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Died St. Louis, Mo., May 23, 1862. 

Transferred V. R. 0. Sept. 3, 1863. Dead. 

Died July 30, 1911. 

Died Nashville, Tenn., Mar. 17, 1862. 

Mustered Out Nov. 2, 1864. Monon, Ind. 

Killed Chickamauga Sept. 19, 1863. 

National Military Home, Danville, 111. 

Dead. 

Died Louisville, Ky., June 24, 1863. 

Transferred V. R. C. April 30, 1864. 

Died Nov. 19, 1903. 
Dead. 

Deserted Nashville Sept. 10, 1862. Dead. 

Deserted Stamford, Ky., Feb. 22, 1862. Dead. 

Killed Mill Springs Jan. 19, 1862. 

Died at Thorntown, Ind., Nov. 13, 1863. 

Died Sept. 3, 1S82. 

Otterbein, Ind. 

Deserted Lebanon, Ky., Oct. 22, 1861. Unknown. 

Died 1903. 

Killed Mill Springs Jan. 19, 1862. 

Died at Lebanon, Ky., Jan. 29, 1862. 

Died at Lebanon, Ky., Jan. 20, 1862. 

Died Feb. 19, 1885. 

Caledonia, Mich. 



io6 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY H 



Tippecanoe County 





Entry into 
the Service 


Discharge 

from the 

Service 


Cause of 
Discharge 


Wounded at 


Re-Enlisted in 


LENGTH OF SERVICE 




NAME AND RANK 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 




Sept. IS, 1861 
Oct. 2, 1861 
Oct. 2, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Dee. 10, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Mar. 21, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 


Sept. 19, 1864 
Oct. 5, 1861 


Exp. Service 






3 years 

3 days 
7m 37 days 

3 years 
4m 5 days 

3 years 
4m 24 days 

3 years 

3 years 
6m 8 days 
2y 9m 15d 
2 yrs 20 days 

3 years 
2y 11m I7d 
4m 2 days 
2y 6m 7d 
ly 8m 25d 
2y 6m 15d 
6m 16 days 

3 years 

7 months 

2 yrs. lm 

2y 5m 16d 

3 years 
2y llm 17d 




3 years 

3 days 
7m 27 days 

3 years 
4m 5 days 

3 years 
4m 24 days 

3 years 

21 years 

6m 8 days 

3y 8m 5d 

2 yrs 20 days 

3 years 
3y 10m 7d 
4m 2 days 
2y 6m 7d 
2y 7m 24d 


















l 








Sept. 19, 1864 


Exp. Service 








Linnsburg-, Webster Co., Iowa. 
Died at Lebanon, Ky., Jan. 23, 1862. 
Appointed Corporal. Died Feb., 1903. 










Fisher, William R. 


Sept. 19, 1864 


Exp. Service 
















Goble, Stephen L. . 


Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Mar. 26, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Oct. 8, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Transfer 








Died August, 1901. 
Died Oct. 14, 1906. 






18th U. S. Infty. 


18 years 








Dead. 


Goehring, John R. 


Chickamaugu. Ga. 

Sept. 19, 1863 
Chickamauga, Ga. 




10m 20 days 


Recruit. Transferred H 58th Ind. Unknown. 






Died Rebel Prison Oct. 8, 1863, wounds. 




Exp. Service 
Transfer 






Bronson, Burbon Co., Kans. 


Holland, Peter A. . _„ 




10m 20 days 


Veteran. Transferred H 5Sth Ind. Dead. 








Died at Lebanon, Ky., Jan. 20, 1862. 




April 25, 1864 
Jan. 13, 1863 
Mar. 3, 1864 


Disability 
Disability 
Disability 








Dead. 






12th Tnd. Battery 


8m 29 days 


Dead. 




Lafayette, Ind. 










6m 16 days 

3 years 
7 months 
2yrs. Sm 
2y 5m 16d 

3 years 
3y 10m 7d 


Died at Somerset, Ky., April 3, 1862. 




Sept. 19, 1864 


Exp. Service 








Darlington, Ind. 










Died at Nashville, Tenn., Mar. 18, 1S62. 




April 21, 1864 
Mar. 4, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 


Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 




nth Rgt. Hancock 
Vet. Corps 


7 months 


Died Julv -'4, 1906. 


Lingo, Frederick 


Chickamauga, Ga. 


Dead. 










Morgan, William H. 






lOni 20 days 


Veteran. Transferred H 58th Ind. Dead. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



107 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY H 



Tippecanoe County 



NAME AND RANK 



Miler, Joseph Sept. 

Mcintosh, John J. Sept. 

Nichols, John Sept. 

Noyes, Luther Dec. 

Piatt, James Sept. 

Patterson, Thomas J. Sept. 

Porter, James W. Sept. 

Peters, Daniel Nov. 

Rand, Edward L. Sept. 

Rowley, Patrick Sept. 

Ryan, Willam O. Sept. 

Scott, Levi H. I Sept. 

Stephenson, William P. Sept. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sprague, James 

Smith, George H. _._ 
Stone, William J. __. 

Tate, Jacob T. 

Thompson, Aaron L. . 

Tyler, Joseph _ __ 

Taylor, Ingraham 

Taylor, Nathaniel 

Talbot, William 

Tracy, William G. — 

Tomer, Patrick 

Weaver, Francis 

Woodruff, Ephriam _ 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Sept. 



Sept. 19, 
May IS, 
Dec. 19, 
Sept. 27, 
Sept. 19, 



Sept. 19, 
Mar. 2. 
Sept. 19, 



1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1S61 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 Sept. 5 

1861 Sept. 19, 

1861 

Sept. 19, 
Feb. 11, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1861 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounded at 



Exp. Service 
Disability 
Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 



Re Enlisted in 



1863 
1865 
1864 



Prisoner ' . 
Transfer ]. 
Exp. Service . 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1862 
1861 



1864 
1864 



1S64 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 



Jan. 24, 
Oct. 2, 
Sept. 5, 
April 1, 
Sept. 19, 



1862 
1864 
1863 
1864 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Chiekamauga, Ga. 



Disability 
Promotion 
Transfer 
Disability 
Exp. Service 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



5m 28 days 



3 years 

8 months 

ly 3m Id 

10m 12 days 

3 years 
8m 11 days 

2 years 
2y 10m 25d 

3 years 
2y 6m 3d 

2y 11m 17d 

3 years 
5m 19 days 

3 years j 

2y 4m 23d I 

3 years 

2y 10m 17d 10m 20 days 

3 years j 

2y 10m 17d 10m 20 days 

3 years | 

6m 17 days 



10m 20 day: 



Total 
Service 



ly 3m 6d 
7m 20 days 
2y 11m 3d |10m 20 days 
ly lm lid j 



3 years 

8 months 

ly 3m Id 

10m 12 days 

3 years 
8m 11 days 

2 years 
3y 4m 23d 

3 years 
2y 6m 3d 

3y 10m 7d 

3 years 
x5m 19 days 

3 years 
2y 4m 23d 

3 years 
3y 10m 7d 

3 years 
3y 10m 7d 

3 years 
6m 17 days 
ly 3m 6d 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



3 years 



I 



3y 9m 23d 

ly 11m lid 
3 years 



Died Aug. 22, 1904, Wichita, Kans. 

Died Salt Lake, Utah, 1894. 

Dead. 

Care of McComt & Hills Co., 80-82 4th Ave., 

New York City, N. Y. 
Eridyville, Iowa. 

Died at Evansville, Ind., May 29, 1862. 

Starved Andersonville, Ga. 

Dead. 

Died June 12, 1901. 

Died Gallatin, Tenn., Mar. 21, 18G3, wounds. 

Veteran. Transferred H 58th Ind. Inf. 

1758 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 
Died 1911. 

Died at Nishville, Tenn., Mar. 7, 1862. 

Monon, Ind. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Veteran. Transferred H 58th Ind. Dead. 

Andrews, Ind. 

Veteran. Transferred H 58th Ind. Inf. 

Unknown. 
Dead. 

Died at Columbia, Tenn., April 5, 1862. 

Died Aug. 8, 1905. Washington, D. C. 

Recruit. 422 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Veteran. Transferred H 58th Ind. Inf. Dead. 

Died Jan. 27, 1895. 

Dead. 



COMPANY I 



This Company was recruited at Lebanon, Boone County, 
Indiana, during the month of August, 1861. Reported at 
Camp Tippecanoe about September 3rd, 1861, and the fol- 
lowing officers were duly elected : 



Captain 

1st Lieutenant. 
2nd Lieutenant . 
1st Sergt 



Jehu W. Perkins 
. . . Felix Shumate 

George Scott 

. William Shumate 




CAPTAIN .IKHU W. PERKINS. 



It accompanied the regiment to Indianapolis and was 
sworn into the L'nited States service Sept. 18, 1861, with 74 
men ; recruits received during term of service, 40 men ; total 
114 men. 

The Company sustained the following losses : 

Killed in action 3 

Died from wounds 5 

Died from disease 10 

Discharged for disability 26 

Discharged for wounds 1 

Promoted 2 

Taken prisoner 2 

Transferred to 58th Ind. Recruits 20 

Deserted 7 

Mustered out September 19, 1864 38 



114 



Died since the war 48 

Living at present time ^J 

1 "nknown 4 

See Muster Roll. 




CAPTAIN FELIX SHUMATE 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY I 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Capt. Jehu W. Perkins 

1st Lieut. Felix Shumate— 

2d Lieut. George Scott 

1st Sergt. "William Shumate. 

2d Sergt. Ira S. Perkins 

3d Sergt. Sam F. Thomphon 
4th Sergt. William Gillnian__ 
5th Sgt. Wm. H. Pennington 
1st Corpl. John A: Taggart- 
2d Corpl. Harvey C. Price— 
3d Corpl. Harvey A. Gipson_ 
4th Corpl. Wm. C. Endieott- 
5th Cpl. Sam'l C. Dougherty 
6th Cpl. Peter B. Kellinberger 
Tth Corpl. Geo. W. Wilson— 
8th Corpl. R. P. WUIiamson. 
Musician Genio S. Lawrence. 
Musician Jasper N. GHpson__ 
Wagoner John McCullough__ 

Allison, Alfred T. 

Ambrose, Killian 

Anderson, Albert D. 

Beach, James T. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 2, 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. 2, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 

Nov. 5, 
Oct. 26, 
Oct. 15, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 
Mar. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



19, 186-1 
12, 1865 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 



July 
Aug. 
May 

May 



30, 1862 

22, 1863 

6, 1862 

6, 1862 



Sept. 
Sept. 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 



Seut. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
April 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



1, 1865 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 

18, 1862 

19, 1864 
21, 1863 

5, 1864 
5, 1864 



Cause of 
Discbarge 



Wounded at 



Exp. Service' Corinth, Mis 

Exp. Service . 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 



Disability 

Disability 
Disability 
Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Corinth, Miss. 
Tullahoma, Tenn, 



Close War 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Transfer 
Transfer 



Re-Enlisted in 



Co. I 3 mos. 10th 



3 mos. 10th 



3 mos. 10th 
3 mos. 10th 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



Co. I 3 mos. 10th 
F Sfith Ind. 



3 mos. 10th 



Musician Co. C 
150th Ind. Inf. 



3 mos. 10th 



2y 3m 14d 

3 years 

3y 6m 12d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

6 months 

10m 12 days 

1 yr. 4 days 

7m 14 days 

7m 14 clays 

Sm 14 days 

3 years 

3 years 

13 days 

3y 11m 3d 

3 years 

3 years 

7 months 

3 years 

ly 2m 16d 

2y 10m 9d 

2y 10m 20d 



In Other Or- 1 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



3m 14 days 
3m 14 days 



2y 10m Id 



3m 14 days 
6m 10 days 



3m 14 days 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



2y 3m 14d 
3y 3m 14d 
3y 9m 26d 
3y 3m ltd 
3y 3m lid 
3 years 

6 months 
13m 26 days 

ly 3m ISd 

7m 14 days 

• 7m 11 days 

3y 6m 15d 

3 years 

3 years 

13 days 

3y 11m 3d 

3y 3m ltd 

3y 6m lOd 

7 months 
3y 3m Ltd 
ly 2m 16d 
3y 9m 29d 
3y 9m lOd 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 

Died Chattanooga, Tenn., Nov. 16, '63, wounds. 

Promoted Captain Nov. 16, 1863. 

Died Dec. 8, 1894. 
Captured Atlanta Campaign. Promoted 1st 

Lieut. Nov. 16, 1863. Dead. 
Died May 28, 1894. 

Promoted Quartermaster Sergt. See N. C. Staft'. 

Appointed Sergeant Major. See N. C. Staff. 

Died Somerset, Ky., Mar. 18, 1862. 

Lawton, Okla. 

Appointed Sergeant. Died wounds. 

Dead. 

Butler, Bates Co., Mo. 

Mustered Out 86th Ind. June 12, 1865. Dead. 

Appointed Sergt. Mulvane, Summer Co., Kans 

Appointed 1st Sergt. Died July 30, 1907. 

Deserted Louisville, Ky., Oct. 1, 1861. Dead. 

Captured at Chiekamauga. Darlington, Ind. 

National Military Home, Leavenworth, Kans. 

Died July 27, 1893. 

Dead. 



Dead. 

Recruit. 

Recruit. 



Dead. 

Transferred to I 58tb Ind. Inf. Dead. 



Recruit. Transferred to I 58th Ind. Inf. 
Died 1901. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY I 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Beck, William H. 

Black. David 

Boyles, Harvey 

Bosley, Martin V. 

Caldwell, Henry 

Caldwell, Leonidas __. 

Carter, Abram C. 

Clark, Martin 

Dougherty, Daniel 

Daugherty, Michael _. 
Dinsmore, James S. _. 

Dixon, Ebenezer 

Doss, William H. 

Dormire, Richard G. _. 

Dukes, Paris M. 

Dukes, James 

Enfleld, William H. _. 
Evans, William H. H 

Farmer, Samuel 

Einney, Lewis 

Fish, Jesse 

Gilmore, Abijah H. __. 
Graham, Woodson __. 
Green, David 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dec. 1, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Oct. 1, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Oct. 1(1, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Oct. 24, 
Oct. 22, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 111. 1864 



April 18, 1862 
Feb. 19, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
May 19, 1862 



Sept. 5, 1864 
Oct. 18, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 



Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Disability 



Transfer 
Arrest 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Mill Springs, Ky. 



2m 13 days 
3 years 



4m 22 days 
5m 25 days 
7 months 
ly 4m 18d 

3 years 
4m 3 days 

3 years 

2y 3m 9d 

3 years 

3 years 

2y 10m 25d 

3 years 
2 yrs. 2 days 
ly lm lid 

3 years 
8m 1 day 
2m 5 days 
ly 10m 13d 

2 years 

3 years 
3 years 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



13m 27 days 



10m 20 days 

In Jail 
ly 4m 15d 



Total 

Service 



2m 13 days 
3 years 



4m 22 days 
5m 25 days 
7 months 



3 years 
4m 3 days 

3 years 
2y 3m 9d 

3 years 

3 years 
4 yrs 22 days 

3 years 
2 yrs. 2 days 
ly lm lid 

3 years 
8m 1 day 
2m 5 days 
2y 9m 3d 
3y 4m 15d 

3 years 

3 years 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Died Lebanon, Ky., Dec. 3, 1861. 

Appointed Corporal. Dead. 

505 Olive St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Died Lebanon, Ky., Feb. 9, 1862. 

Died Louisville, Ky., Mar. 15, 1862. 

Dead. 

Killed L. & I. R. R. collision Oct., 1864. 

Died May 31, 1910. 

Died Jan. 21, 1862, wounds. 

Hagers Grove, Shelby Co., Mo. 

Captured at Cbickainauga. Died Danville, Va., 

Prison Dee. 27, 1863. 
Dead. 

236 Green St., Chicago, Til. 

Recruit. Dead. 

Appointed Corporal. Dead. 

Died Cumberland, Tenn., Sept. 20, 1863. 

Deserted Lebanon, Ky., Oct. 29, 1862. 

Died July, 1899. 
Appointed Corporal. 922 Hamilton St., 

Lebanon, Ind. 
Died Aug. 3, 1903. 

Recruit. Killed Rolling Fork, Ky., Dee. -J.9, '62. 

Mustered Out July 25, 1863, as Q.-M. Sergeant. 

Recruit. Transferred to 1 I 58th Ind. Dead. 
Arrested and imprisoned for desertion. M. 0. 

Feb. 3, 1865. Bear Lake, Mich. 
New r Brunswick, Ind. 

Sparks, Cherry Co., Neb. 



112 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY I 



Boone County 



NAME AND RANK 



Green, Richard 

Grady, Michael P. 

Gallion, Joseph 

Hawkins, John W. 

Hendricks, Geo. W. 
Hickerson, Samuel C. 
Hickerson, James L. _. 

Hessler, Jesse J. 

Highland, James 

Hamilton, William W. 
Hamilton, Francis L. . 

Howard, Henry W. 

Hogan, Basil 

Harlan, Freeman L. _. 
Hartley, Orlando L. . 

Hart, Harvey A. 

Hamilton, Aaron 

James, David 

James, Thomas J. 

Keath, James 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 18, 
Oct. 9, 
Nov. 10, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Feb. 11, 
Oct. 9, 
Oct. 14, 
Oct. 26, 
Nov. 15, 
Oct. 15, 
Feb. 6, 
Jan. 1, 
Mar. 4, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Kellogg, Joseph ..Sept. 18, 



Kempton, Daniel 
King, Thomas J. 
Kersey, David C. 



Kept. 18, 
Mar. 4, 
Feb. 14, 



1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1864 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1881 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1862 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19. 18<iJ 



Sept. 5, 1864 
Jan. 15, 1863 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
April 18, 1862 



Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Aug. 12, 1862 



Mar. 10, 1862 



Sept. 5, 1864 



June 13, 1862 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Transfer 
Wounds 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 



Mill Springs, Ky. 
Jan. 19, 1862 



Transfer 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Disability 



Disability 



Disability 



Exp, Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 



Chiekamauga 



Re-Enlisted in 



LENGTH OP SERVICE 



In Tenth 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



3 years | 

4m 16 days I 

ly 9m 25d 1 10m 20 days 
2y 10m 27d ! 



3 years 

? years 

3 years 

7 months i 

5m 17 days | 

I 
5m 26 days '10m 20 days 

2y 11m 17d |10m 20 days 

2y 10m 21d 1 10m 20 days 

rim in days '; 

10m 3 days ! 

4m 26 days ' 



2y 8m 4d 



S months 

4 months 

3 years 

3 years 

2y 6m Id 

2y fim 21d 



3m 6 days 



10m 20 days 
6m 15 days 



3 years 

4m 16 days 

2y Sm 15d 

2y 10m 27d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

7 months 

5m 17 days 

ly 4m 16d 

3y 10m 7d 

3y 9m lid 

9m 16 days 

10m 3 days 

4m 26 days 



3 years 



S months 

4 months 

3 years 

3 years 

3y fim 21d 

3y Im (id 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Butler City, Boyd Co., Neb. 

Died Feb. 3, 1862, wounds. 

Lebanon, Ind. 

Olathe, Kans. 

Died Aug. 23, 1895. 

Colfax, Ind. 

Died Jan. 17, 1882. 

Dead. 

Died Somerset, Ky., Mar. 7, 1862. 

Recruit. Transferred to I 58th Ind. Inf. Died 

May 31, 1906. 
Recruit. Transferred to I 58th Ind. Inf. Dead. 

Recruit. Transferred to I 5Sth Ind. Inf. 

Lebanon, Ind. 
Recruit. Dead. 

Recruit. Deserted Sent. 18, 1862. 

Died April 13, 1S7S. 
Recruit. Unknown. 

Recruit. Deserted Mar. IS, 1862. Dead. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. M. O. 

Dec. 31, 1864. Died June 6, 1900. 
Frankfort, Ind. 

Recruit. 2437 Bond St., Indianapolis. 

Killed Mill Springs, Ky., Jan. 19, 1862. 

Died Feb. 3, 1892. 

R. R. J, Berdenville, Kans. 

Recruit. Transferred to 5Sth Ind. Inf. Dead. 
Lebanon, Ind., May 20, 1883. 

Recruit. Transferred to 5Sth Ind. Inf. Cap- 
tured and hung by Rebels in North Carolina. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



"3 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY 



Boone County 





Entry into 
the Service 


Discharge 

from the 

Service 


Cause of 
Discharge 


Wounded at 


Re-Enlisted in 


LENGTH OF SERVICE 




NAME AND RANK 


In Tenth 


In Other Or- 
ganizations 


Total 
Service 


REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 


Lowery, John H. 


Sept. 18, 1861 
Feb. 8, 1862 
Feb. 14, 1862 
Oct. 14, 1861 
Feb. 20, 1862 
Sept. IS, 1861 
Nov. 10, 1861 










2 yrs. 2 days 
2y 6m 27 d 
ly 11m 24d 
2y 11m 21d 
2y 6m 15d 
10m 9 days 
2y 10m 25d 




2 yrs. 2 days 

3y 7m 17d 
2y 5m 4d 

3y 10m lid 
3y 5m 5d 

10m 9 days 

3y 9m 15d 


Killed at Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 20, 1863. 


Sept. 5, 1864 
Jan. 0, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 5,. 1S64 


Transfer 
Disability 
Transfer 
Transfer 






10m 20 days 
3m 10 days 
10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 






Co. H 135th Ind. 


Elkader, Iowa. 














1527 S. Highland, Chanute, Kans. 








1903. 
Died Corinth, Miss., June 27, 1802. 


Moore, Wilford W. _ 


Sept. 5, 1864 














Feb. 14, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 






Osborne, Hiram M. . 










7m 24 days 

3 years 
5m 19 days 
Sy 6m ISd 
2y 5m 21d 
3 years 
3 years 
6m 13 days 
2y 2m 15d 





7m 24 days 
3 years 

5m 19 days 
3y 5m Sd 

2y 5m 21d 
3 years 
3 years 

6m 13 days 

2y 2ni 15d 
2y 9m 3d 

3m 19 days 

ly 3m 13d 

1 yr. 17 days 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 


Died Corinth, Miss., May 11, 1862. 


Osborne, Napoleon B. _ __ 


Sept. 19, 1804 


Exp. Service 








Dead. 


Parsons, Robert B. 








Died Somerset, Ky., Mar. 9, 1S62. 


Pennington, John W. 


Feb. 17, 1862 
Feb, 15, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. IS, 1861 
Dec. 1, 1861 
Mar. 4, 1862 
Oct. 22, 1862 
Oct. 24, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Oct. 14, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sent. 18. 1801 


Sept. 5, 1864 


Transfer 






10m 20 days 


Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Dead. 


Pennington, George W. 


Atlanta, Ga. 




Recruit. Died Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 0, 1864. 


Richardson, John A. 


Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
June 14, 1862 


Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 




Wounds. 

Appointed Corporal. Died Jan. "8, 1889. 


Robertson, Ebenezer _ 








R. R. 0, Lebanon, Ind. 












Rayburn, William __ 


Chickamauga 






Rccrut. Died Lebanon, Ind., May 19, 1864. 


Rilev, Preston 


Sept. 5, 1864 


Transfer 




ly 10m 13d 
3m 19 days 


10m 20 days 


Wounds. 


Riley, Isaac - 






Recruit. Died Gallatin, Tenn., Feb. 12, 1863. 


Shanklin, Oscar D. 


aJn. fi, 1863 
Nov. 10, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sent. 19. 1804 


Disability 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exo. Service 


Mill Springs. Ky., 
Jan 19, 1862 




ly 3m 13d 

1 yr. 17 days 

3 years 






Shanklin, Elzer C. 






Recruit. Died May 8, 1894. 


Sims, Joseph M. 








ReDublic, Mo. 


Small, Thomas M. . 








Appointed Corporal. Lebanon, Ind. 


Stancliff. David H. 






3 years 




Rosendale, Andrews Co., Mo. 



ii4 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY I 



Boone County 



NAME AND HASP 



Smith, Thomas 

Stephenson, Thomas J 
Strauhan, Oliver 31. __. 
Sullins, John H. M. __. 

Shields, Robert 

Shultz, Joseph 

Swope, Joseph M. 

Tallman, William 

Talbert, Wilson 

Tibbells' John H. 

Vest, Robert B. 

Wilson, Robert 

Weliver, Henry S. 

Whitzel, John R. 

Woolkins, Constantine 

Walton, Isaac 

Waters, Isham L. 

Weese, William H. ___. 
Tork, Semer A. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Oct. 19, 
Oct. 14, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
April 20, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Feb. 15, 
Feb. 8, 
Feb. 10, 
Sept. 18, 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1861 

1863 

1861 

18611. . 

1861 Mar. 

1861 Jan. 
1861 ' 

1862 April 
1862 Nov. 
1862 .Sept. 
1861 1 Sept. 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 
19, 1864 

5, 1864 
19, 1864 
25, 1862 

5, 1864 
19, 1864 



18, 1862 
13, 1864 



6, 1863 
4, 1862 

5, 1864 
19, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Transfer 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



Kenesaw Mtn., Ga. 



Exp. Service Tullahoma, Tenn. 
June 29, 1863 



Disability 
Disability 



Disability 
Disability 

Transfer i_ 
Exp. ServiceL 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3 years 
3 years 
3 years 
3 years 
3 years 
2 yrs. 11m 
2y 10m 21d 

3 years 
1 yr. 7 days 
ly 4m 15d 

3 years 
4m 12 days 
7 months 
2y 3m 25d 
ly 3m lOd 
ly lm 19d 
8m 24 days 
2y 6m 25d 
3 years 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



10m 20 days 



10m 20 flays 



10m 20 days 



3 


years 


3 


years 


3 


years 


3 


years 


3 


years 


2 years 11m 


3y 


9m lid 


3 


years 


l yr 


. 7 days 


2y 


3m 5d 


3 


years 


4m 


12 days 


7 months 


2y 


3m 25d 


iy 


3m lOd 


iy 


lm 19d 


8m 


24 days 


3y 


5m 25d 


3 


years 



Dead. 

Meadville, Linn Co., Mo. 

Appointed Sergeant. Died Lebanon, Ind., 

Sent. 8, 1882. 
Died April 11, 1908. 

511 E. 9th St., Indianapols, Ind. 

Unknown. 

Recrut. Transferred 58th Ind. 

Hlizaville, Ind. 
521 Bryan Aye., Danville, 111., 

Died April 8, 1883. 

Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Inf. 

Lowery City, Mo. 
Appointed Sergeant. Allerton, Iowa. 



62. Died Nov. 3, 1S7-J. 



Deserted Jan. SO, 

Dead. 

Unknown. 

Deserted Gallatin, Tenn., Dec. 28, 1862. 

Forest City, Holt Co., Mo. 
Recruit. Unknown. 



Recruit. Peaksville, Mo. 

Recruit. Appointed Corporal. 

58th Ind. Hillisbmg, Ind. 
Dead. 



Transferred 



COMPANY K 



This Company was recruited and organized in Frankfort, 
Clinton Count}', Indiana, by John W. Blake, Samuel H. Shor- 

tle, John \Y. Hunt, and 
William W. Wilds. The 
following officers w ere 
elected : 

Capt., John W. Blake 
i st Lt., Sam H. Shortle 
2nd Lt., Wm. W. Wilds 
ist. Sgt, Geo. W. Wilds 

By some scheme previ- 
ously concocted this Com- 
pany was credited to Tip- 
pecanoe County, when it 
rightfully should have been 
credited to Clinton. This 
transaction showed very 
plainly that "graft" existed 
in the land as early as 1861, 
as this transfer would 
captaia' samuel h. shortlb never had been made if the 
Kiiiea at chiokamaiiga money had not been paid. 

Blake was soon after commissioned Colonel of the 40th 
Indiana September 23, 1861 ; Lieutenant Shortle promoted 




Captain and John W. Hunt made ist Lieutenant from the 
ranks over 2nd Lieut. Wilds. 

The Company arrived at Indianapolis September 17th, 
and on September 18th, 1861, was mustered into the United 
States with 95 men; recruits received, 22 men; total, 117 men. 

The Company sustained the following losses : 

Promotion 1 

Killed accidentally 1 

Died from wounds 8 

Died from disease 11 

Discharged for wounds 3 

Discharged for disease 28 

Transferred to V. R. C 1 

Transferred Mississippi Marine Brigade 1 

Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf., Veterans 1 

Transferred to 58th Ind. Inf., Recruits 15 

Deserted 1 

Mustered out September 19, 1864 46 

ii7 
See Muster Roll. 

Died since war 61 

Living at present time 34 

Unknown 2 



n6 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY K 



Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Capt. Samuel H. Shortle— 

1st Lieut. John W. Hunt 

2d Lieut. William W. Wilds— 
1st Sergt. George M. Wilds— 
2d Sergt. Charles H. Biekley 
3d Sergt. Stephen M. Aiken— 
4th Sergt, Craven Thompson 
5th Sergt. William Atwood— 
1st Corpl. James Gibbons,— 

2d Corpl. David J. Cox 

3d Corpl. James F. White._. 
4th Corpl. Harrison Derrick- 
5th Corpl. John A. Babb— 
6th Corpl. James T. Doster__ 
7th Corpl. Thomas S. Peak— 
8th Cpl. Archibald Gladman, 

Musieian William Hughes 

Musician Norman Newton— _ 

Wagoner Daniel Neeves 

Alexander, John W. 

Amos, John W. 

Amos, William H. 

ISrinson, Willam H. 

Brinson, Thomas A. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Oct. 7, 
Spet. 2, 
Spet. 2, 
Sept, 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept, 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sent. 18, 
Sept, 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Feb. 14, 
Dec. 2fi, 
Dee. 11, 
Sept. 1, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1863 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Aug. 24, 
July 29, 

Jan. 14, 
April 30, 



1864 
1864 
1803 
1862 
1863 
1862 



Sent. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 
May 30, 
Sept. 19, 
May 18, 
Sept. 19, 
May 12, 



1864 
1862 
1864 
1862 
1864 
1802 



1862 
1861 



May 30, 
Feb. 25, 
July 15, 
Sept. 5, 



1803 Sept. 



Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 



1862 
1802 
1862 
1864 
1864 
1804 
1804 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Disability 
Disability 
Disability 
Disability 



Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Chickamauga, Ga. 
Sept, 19, 1863 



Re-Enlisted in 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept, 19, 1863 



Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Wounds 
Exp. Servcie 
Disability 



Disability 

Disability 

Disability 

Transfer 

Transfer 

Transfer 

Exp. Service 



3m 10th Ind., 72d 
Ind., 44th Ind, 



Mis'n Rge. Nov. 25, 

'03: Chickamauga 

Mill Springs, Ky., 

Jan. 19, 1862 



Sertg. Co. B 116th 
Ind. 



Co. G 80th Ind. 



2 years 

3 years 
3 years 

ly 11m Od 



7m 12 days 
2 yrs. 6 days 

3 years 

2y 11m 26d 

2y 11m 6d 

8m 12 days 

3 years 

8 months 

3 years 

7m 24 days 

ly 4m 19d 

8m 12 days 

5m 7 days 

5 months 

Sm 9 days 

8m 24 days 

2 yrs. 4 days 

3 years 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



2 years 

3 years 
3 years 

ly 11m Od 



3 yrs 20 days 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



7m 12 days 
2 yrs. days 

3 years 

2y 11m 26d 

2y llm 6d 

8m 12 days 

3 years 

8 months 

3 years 

7m 24 days 

ly 4m 19d 

8m 12 days 

3y 1m 3d 

5 months 

ly 6m 29d 

ly 7m 14d 

2y 10m 24d 

3 years 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Died Oct. 13, 1863. Wounds. 

Dead. 

Farmland, Ind. 

Died Oct. 26, 1906. 

Dead. 

137 Pierce St., West Lafayette, Ind. 

Ded Oct. 14, 1894. 

Died Sept. 24, 1864. Wounds. 

Died Frankfort, Ind., April, 1883. 

Accdentally killed Jeft'ersonville Sept. 14, 1S04. 

Appointed Sergeant. Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Died April 20. 1907. 

Dead. 

Died Feb. 7, 1S03. 

Dead. 

Mastered Out S6th Ind. Sept. 5. 1865. Dead. 

Recruit. Died July, 1902. 

Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Mustered Out 

July 25, 1S05. Scireleville, Iud. 
Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Died June 

14, 1907. 
Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. Dead. 

Dead. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



117 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY K 



Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Baker, Jackson 

Baker, William T. ... 

Bauni, William 

Blinn, Jesse 

Bowser, Daniel 

Burt, .Samuel 

Bowel's, John 

Carter, Joseph 

Chenoweth, Henry _. 
Cohee, Benjamin — 

Colby, Charles 

Colby, Tliatideus S. . 
Coft'man, James M. . 
Cofl'man, John 8. ... 

Clark, A. C. 

Downard, David W. . 
Duline, William R. __. 

Dunlap, Joseph 

Dougherty, Joseph L 

Dawson, Mathias 

Edmonds, Cyrus 

Forbush, Walter 

Foran, Patrick Y. __ 
Gladman, Orrin 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
April 3, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dee. 26, 
Mar. 20, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1863 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Nov. 29, 1S02 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
April 23, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 
1862 
1864 



Sept. 19, 
May 18, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Feb. 7, 



1864 
1862 



1864 
1864 



Jan. 16, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 30, 
May 16, 
Sept. 5, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1863 
1864 
1864 
1863 
1862 
1864 
1864 
1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 



Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Disability 



Disability . 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Disability 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Mill Springs, Ky. 

Jan. 19, 1863 
Mill Springs, Ky. 

Jan. 19, 1863 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Re Enlisted in 



Co. B 116 Ind. Inf. 
Co. D 150 Ind. Inf. 



Mill Springs, Ky., 
Jan. 19, 1862 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



7m 13 days 

ly 2m 9d 

4m 22 days 

3 years 

3 years 

7m 5 days 

3 years 

2 years 
5m 16 days 

3 years 
S months 

3 years 

3 years 

2y 5m 2d 

ly 4m -9il 



ly 3m 28d 

3 years 
8m 9 days 
ly 6m lod 
7m 28 days 
2y 11m 17d 
3 years 
3 years 



In Other Or 
ganizations 



6m 28 days 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



7m 13 days 

ly 2m 9d 

4m 23 days 

3 years 

3 years 

7m 5 days 

3 years 

2 years 
5m 16 days 

3 years 
2y lm 3d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

ly 4m 19d 



ly 3m 28d 

3 years 
8m 9 days 
ly 6m lOd 
7m 28 days 
3y 10m 7d 
3 years 
3 years 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Died May 1, 1862. 

Died May 28, 1910. 

Died Somerset, Ky., Feb. 10, 1802. Wounds. 

Frankfort, Ind. 

Frankfort, Ind. 

Died May 15, 1910. 

Dead. 

Died Sept. 19, 1863. Wounds. 

Died March 0, 1862, Somerset, Ky. 

Stoekwell, Ind. 

Mustered Out 116th Ind. Mar 1, 1864. Mustered 

Out 150th Ind. Aug. 8, 1865. Dead. 
Dead. 

National Military Home, Danville, III. 

Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Mustered Out 

Anril 3, 1865. Dead. 
Dead. 

Died Feb. 6, 1862, Somerset, Ky. Wounds. 

Dead. 

Died June, 1907. 

Died June 22, 1888. 

Recruit. Transferred V. R. C. Michigantown. 

Horton, Kans. 

Veteran. Transferred 58th Ind. Mustered Out 
July 25, '65. 426 N. State St., Greenfield. Ind. 
Dead. 

Frankfort, Ind. 



n8 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INEANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY K 



Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Gipson, George W. - 
Harris, Benjamin — 

Harris, William 

Hancock, Timothy .. 

Hart, Silas 

Hardesty, William SI 
Highlands, Michael _. 
Henderson, Robert _. 

Huff, Abijah J. 

Huff, Andrew L. — 

Hunt, Thomas 

Hendricks, William _ 
Hoekman, Mlton C. 

Irvine, Johnson 

King, William H. ... 
Kingsolver, John M. 

Kelley, Samuel 

Lanum, Peter 

Lamaster, William _ 

Layton, William 

Lipp, Stephen W. .-_ 
Lough, Logan 3. — 

Lough, Wesley 

Lucas, George 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Feb. 26, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. IS, 
Oct. 11, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Dee. 27, 
Feb. 16, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18, 
Sept. 18. 



1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
186? 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19, 
Nov. 21, 
April 30, 
Jan. 26, 
Nov. 21, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1862 
1862 
1864 
1862 
1864 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 



Sept. 0, 1864 



Sept. 19, 

Sept. 19, 

Sept. 5, 

Sept. SO, 

Sept. 19, 

Sept. 5, 

Sept. 5, 

Sept. 19, 

Sept. 19, 

June 13, 



1864 
1864 
1864 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1862 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Wounded at 



Exp. Service 

Disability 

Disability 

Disability 

Disability 

Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 

Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Transfer 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 



Ohickamauga, Ga, 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Re-Enlisted in 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3 years 

ly 2m 3d 

7m 12 days 

2y 11m Scl 

ly 2m 3d 

3 years 

2 yrs. 2 days 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

4m 5 days 

2y 6m 9d 

ly 7m 15d 

3 years 

3 years 

2y 10m 21 d 

2 yrs 12 days 

3 years 

9m 27 days 

2y 6m 19d 

3 years 

3 years 

Sm 25 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



5m 21 days 



1m 9 days 



10m 20 days 
10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



3 years 
ly 2m 3d 
7m 12 days 
2y 11m 8d 
ly 2m 3d 

3 years 
2 yrs. 2 days 

3 years 



3 years 
3 years 

4m 5 days 
3 years 

ly 7m 15d 
3 years 
3 years 
3 years 

J yrs 10 days 
3 years 

ly 8m 17d 

3y 5m 9d 

3 years 

3 years 

Sm 25 days 



REMARKS AND P. 0. ADDRESS 



Dead. 

Pereival, Fremont Co., Iowa. 

Dead. 

Dead. 

Died April 8, 190S. 

Dead. 

Killed Ohickamauga Sept. 20, 1S63. 

Died Colfax, Ind., Nov. 7, 1885. 

Willoughby, Ohio. 

2131 State St., Brightwood, Ind. 

Appointed Corporal. Dead. 

Died Jan. 23, 1862. 

Recruit. Transferred 5Sth Ind. Frankfort, Ind. 

Died Columbia, Tenn., May 3, 1862. Accidental 

wounds. 
Kirklin, Ind. 

Appointed Corporal. R. F. D. No. 1, Sidney, la. 

Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Mustered Out 

Oct. 11, 1864. Graham, Mo. 
Dead. 

Dead. 

Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Mustered Out 
July 25, 1865. Died Mar. IS, 190S. 

Recruit. Transferred 5Sth Ind. Died April 12. 
1907. 

Fairbury, 111. 

Died Dec. 11, 1900. 
Dead. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



119 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY K 



Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Lyons, James 

Lyons, Jefferson 

McOray, William 

McClurg", Henry C. 

McCoy, Quinton 

McCullin, Wallace ___— 

McCoy, John 

McFarland, William T. . 

Morrison, John R. 

Martin, John F. 

Mut chler, Tyre 

Mutchler, William 

Mutchler, John 

Michael, Joseph 

Michael, Eli T. 

Painter, Henry A, 



Price, James 

Pitman, John C. 

Riley, Samuel 

Russell, Johnson - 
Reeves, Haziel S. 
Sneethen, Joseph 
Sims, John F. ___ 



Entry into 
the Service 



Discharge 

from the 
Service 



-|- 



Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Mar. 10, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1S61 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Oct. 11, 1861 
Sept. IS, 1861 
Peak, William J. Oct. 16, 1861 



Sent. 18, 1861 
Feb. 14, 1862 
Mar. 8, 1862 
Sept. 18, 1861 
Dec. 21, 1863 
Sept. 18, 1861 



Sept. 19, 1864 
July 29, 1862 
Nov. 21, 1862 
May 18, 1862 



Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 



Sept. 19, 1864 
Aug. 19, 1862 
Sept. 19, 1864 
Sept. 5, 1864 
April 30, 1862 
Sept. 5, 1864 
Sept. 19, 1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 

Disability 

Disability 



Transfer 
Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 



Exp. Service 

Disability 

Exp. Service 

Transfer 

Disability 

Transfer 

Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Chickaniauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Sept. 5, 1864 



Feb. 14, 1863 



Sept. 18, 1861 Sept. 19, 1864 



Disability 

Exp. Service 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



Re-Enlisted in 



In Tenth 



7m 19 days 

3 years 

10m 11 days 

ly 2m 3d 

8 months 

2 yrs 10 days 

2y 5m 25d 

3 years 
2y 1m 18d 

3 years 
2y 7m 14d 

3 years 
11m 1 day 

3 years 
2y 10m 24 d 
7m 12 days 
2y 10m 17d 

3 years 
2m 15 days 
2y 5m 27d 
5m 19 days 
5m 15 days 
ly 4m 26d 

3 years 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



Total 
Service 



7m 19 days 

3 years 

10m 11 days 

ly 2m 3d 

8 months 

2 yrs 10 days 

6m 24 days 3 yrs 19 days 

3 years 

2y lm 18d 

3 years 
2y 7m 14 d 

3 years 
11m 1 day 

3 years 

3y lm 24d 

7m 12 days 

3 years 

3 years 

2m 15 days 

3y 4m 17d 

5m 19 days 

5m 15 days 

J ly 4m 26d 

3 years 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



1 month 



lm 13 days 



10m 20 days 



Died May 7, 1862. 

Frankfort, Ind. 

Dead. 

315 Brady St., Davenport, Iowa. 

Dead. 

Died Chattanooga, Tenn., Sept. 28, 1863. 

Wounds. 
Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Mustered Out 

Mar. £9, 1865. Vincennes, Ind. 
Stanton, Neb. 

Died Nov. 6, 1863. 

Osage City, Kans. 

Died May 2, 1864. 

R. R. 8, Lebanon, Ind. 

Creston, Iowa. 

Dead. 

Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Mustered Out 

Oct. 11, 1864. Died April 30, 1905. 
Dead-. 

Recruit. Transferred 58th Ind. Mustered Out 

Oct. 16, 1864. Lafavette, Ind. 
Dead. 

Recruit. Died May 1, 1862. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. 

Wakeeney, Trego Co., Kans. 
Died March 9, 1862. 

Died March 5, 1864. 

Humbolt, Neb. 

Elk City, Okla. 



120 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Three Years Service 



COMPANY K 



Clinton County 



NAME AND RANK 



Shortle, George M. 

Skidmore, Robert 

Sholtz, Ferdinand 

Snodgrass, James 

Sharrott, Andrew J. 

Smith, Samuel 

Staley, William H. 

Stowers, Daniel W. 

Stowers, Andrew 

Stephenson, Hugh A, 

Salaman, Enoch C. 

Snedieor, John 

Thompson, James A. 

Thompson, William H. H: 

Thurman, William 

Wilson, James 

Williams, James M. 

Whitaker, John 

Wallace, James P. 

Wellman, John M. 



Entry into 
the Service 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Mar. 

Jan. 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



1861 

1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1862 
1862 
1862 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 
1861 



Discharge 

from the 

Service 



Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Dec. 20, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 
Sept. 19, 



1864 
1864 
1862 
1864 
1864 
1S64 
1864 
1864 



Cause of 
Discharge 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Disability 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 



Wounded at 



Re-Enlisted in 



1864 Transfer 



Sept. 19, 

Sept. 19, 

Sept. 19, 

Sept. 19, 

Sept. 19, 

Feb. 1, 

June 26, 

Sept. 1, 



1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1863 
1862 
1862 



Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Exp. Service 
Transfer 
Disability 
Wounds 



Chickamauga, Ga. 

Sept. 19, 1863 
Chickamauga, Ga.; 

Sept. 19, 1863 



Chickamauga, Ga. 
Sept. 19, 1863 



Chickamauga, Ga 
Sept. 19, 1863 



LENGTH OF SERVICE 



In Tenth 



3 years 

3 years 

ly 3m 2d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

4m 16 days 

2y 5m 27d 

10m 6 days 

ly 5m 26d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

ly 4m 13d 

9m 8 days 

11m 13 days 



In Other Or- 
ganizations 



10m 20 days 



Total 
Service 



3 years 

3 years 

ly 3m 2d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

4m 16 days 

3y 4m 17d 

10m 6 days 

ly 5m 26d 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 

3 years 



9m S days 
11m 13 days 



REMARKS AND P. O. ADDRESS 



Appointed Sergeant. Died Indianapolis, Ind., 

April 10, 1908. 
Appointed Sergeant. Died Dee. 25, 1905. 

Dead. 

Sheridan, Ind. 

Frankfort, Ind. 

Died April 10, 1902 

Died Feb. 9, 1907. 

Dead. 

Died Lebanon, Ky., Feb. 4, 1862. 

Recruit. Transferred to 58th Ind. 
Died Colfax, Ind., Oct. 27, 1885. 
Recruit. Died Nov. 7, 1862. 

Recruit. Deserted Kingston, Ga., May 19, 1S64. 

Unknown. 
Dead. 

Frankfort, Ind. 

Sbelbyville, Ind. 

Dead. 

Died Sept. 11, 1909. 

Transferred to Marine Brigade. Frankfort. 

Dead. 

Dead. 



RECAPITULATION 



Whole Number Mustered in September 19, 1861 

Field and Staff 11 

Non-Commission Staff 7 

Company A 101 

B 101 

C 101 

D 101 

E 101 

F 101 

G 96 

H 90 

I 74 

K 95 

979 

Recruits rec'd during service 184 

Total 1 163 

Losses During Service. 

Killed in battle 40 

Killed accidentally 4 

Died from wounds 23 

Died from injuries 1 



Died from disease 112 

Drowned 1 

Discharged for wounds 15 

Discharged for disability 222 

Promoted 7 

Resigned 21 

Deserted 36 

Captured 6 

Dismissed 1 

Transferred. 

Mississippi Marine Brigade 7 

V. R. C 25 

7th Indiana Battery 2 

United States Signal Corps 5 

2nd U. S. Cavalry 1 

58th Indiana Infantry 

Veterans 73 

Recruits 106 



No. mustered out September 19, i£ 



708 

• 455 



1 1 63 



Field and Staff Mustered Out 1864 




MAJOR JOB II. VAN NATTA 





LIEUT. COL. MARSH B. TAYLOR 




LIEUT. WILLIAM E. LUDLOW 
Adjutant 




LIEUT. CHAS. F. WILSTACH 
Quartermaster 



MAJOR ROBT. A. WILLIAMSON 
Surgeon 



Non-Commissioned Staff Mustered Out 1864 





SAMUEL P. THOMPSON 
Sergeant Major 



IRA S. PERKINS 
Quartermaster Sergeant 



CHAPTER III 

1861 



WE 'were now bona fide soldiers of Uncle Sam. No 
chance to get away unless "sooner discharged or 
shot." Up to this time we had no uniforms and on 
the 21st Gov. Morton issued uniforms to the regiment. These 
uniforms were made of cadet grey trimmed in black. The Con- 
federates had the same uniform and it would never have done 
in a battle as the members would have been mistaken for Reb- 
els. It was the best uniform, so far as material was con- 
cerned, the regiment ever drew during their term of service. 
On Sunday morning, September 22d, the regiment received 
marching orders, and accordingly marched to the Union Sta- 
tion. The right wing was loaded on the first section, left wing 
on second section. The first section left at ten o'clock A. M., 
arriving at Louisville after dark. After disembarking from the 
steam ferry boat, we marched up the levee into the city, and 
was greeted by the citizens of Louisville who cheered us as we 
wended our way through the streets. The female sex was most 
ardent and effusive in their welcome, and nearly every man 
had a girl hanging to his arm. We had invaded the enemy's 
country without arms, cartridge boxes or other means of de- 
fense. Once in a while we could hear some "feller" "hollerin" 
for Jeff Davis, still everybody was orderly and no one mani- 
fested any disposition to contest our entry into Louisville. 

From the steamboat landing we were escorted by the 
Louisville Legion to the Nashville depot. The route was lined 
with men, women and children, white and black, who cheered 



us from start to finish. Upon our arrival at the depot we 
found long tables arranged on which was placed a magnificent 
supper, supplied with everything the heart could wish. Not 
having had an opportunity to get dinner the boys had appe- 
tites that did justice to all that was set before them. After 
supper we "fell in" and marched to the Barbour Tobacco 
Works (or warehouse) where we turned in for the night. 
About midnight the left wing arrived, they too had received 
the same treatment and were correspondingly happy. The fol- 
lowing morning the entire regiment was formed and marched 
to the depot for breakfast, after which we were marched to a 
commons and established camp, south of the city. 

September 24 we were formed and marched to the court 
house to draw guns and other equipment. Upon our arrival 
there we were offered an antiquated type of Belgian rifles, old, 
worn out things, of no account whatever. The regiment pos- 
itively refused to accept them, and were ready to mutinize 
then and there. They claimed they were promised the latest 
and best improved muskets, and to go into a fight with "them 
old swivels," they wouldn't do it, as it was more danger- 
ous to be behind them than in front. One of the boys loaded 
one and fired it for fun, to test its "kicking" qualities. He was 
promptly laid on his back and claimed his shoulder was dis- 
located. 

Colonel Manson finally formed the regiment in a "hollow 
square," made a speech to the men and told them that Governor 



126 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Morton would be there soon and explain everything to them. 
Morton arrived and said : "Boys, this is the best I can do to- 
day. Take these guns and do the best you can, but I pledge 
my word you shall not go into an engagement of any kind un- 
til you are supplied with the best guns that can be obtained. 
In a few days I will send you the Enfield rifle, a new gun and 
a good one." This had the effect. We took the guns and 
marched to camp. The}' were good enough to drill with, which 
was the first thing to learn, at all events. 

After drawing arms the right wing, consisting of Com- 
panies A, F, D. I and C, were ordered to board the cars for 
Lebanon Junction, under command of Lieut. Colonel Kise. 
The "sesech" had burned a railroad bridge at Rolling Fork of 
Salt River, on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, and it was 
important that the same be rebuilt soon as possible as a line 
of communication for the troops west of us. Some fifty or 
sixty men were at work repairing it and the companies acting 
as guards, against any attack from the enemy. Rebel cavalry 
was scouting through the county and was liable to make a 
dash at any time day or night. In the evening a messenger 
arrived at camp and conveyed the information that 300 Rebels 
were in close proximity to the camp and liable to attack at any 
time. Colonel Kise caused pickets to be thrown out and every 
man was ordered to have his gun in good condition with plenty 
of ammunition and hold himself in readiness to "fall in" at a 
moment's warning. 

After a lapse of three hours about 10 o'clock P. M., three 
shots were fired from the picket line. The long roll sounded 



and every man fell in and the companies formed a good line 
of battle in the dark. We had been in line but a short time 
when some of the pickets came in bringing with them a wound- 
ed man, who, upon examination, was found to be the quarter- 
master of Colonel Hecker's German Regiment (24th Illinois). 
He had approached the picket line, was promptly challenged 
but paid no attention to the challenge. He said "arous mit 'em," 
the pickets cut loose, one ball went through his leg and another 
had cut his sword in two. Medical attention was immediately 
given him and he was sent to Louisville on the first train. 
About thirty minutes afterward the line was broken and the 
companies were sent to their quarters and were soon asleep. 

September 26th another grape vine cable message was re- 
ceived that we would be attacked at midnight. The companies 
were soon in line of battle, and Companies C and I were sent 
forward to reconnoitre. Arriving at the bank of the creek, 
they heard suspicious sounds on the opposite side and of course 
could think of nothing else than the "Rebs" were forming for 
a fight. In order that the enemy should not get any advantage 
both companies fired a volley, after which no sound was heard. 
The next morning some of the boys crossed the creek, expecting 
to find the brush full of dead Rebels. All they found was a 
yearling calf, dead, filled with lead. They afterward skinned 
the calf and had veal for dinner. 

On Sunday, September 29th, the bugle sounded the 
"church call," which was the first time we were called to "fall 
in for prayers." Chaplain Daugherty delivered the discourse 
and while the boys were respectful during the services, their 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



127 



minds were otherwise occupied and the "wheat fell among the 
tares," without any good results. 

During the clay another "cablegram" was received by the 
"grape vine wireless," that we would be attacked in a few 
hours. Orders given to strike tents, and "lay on our arms" 
all night. This we did and on the morning of the 30th we 
boarded a train of cars which took us in the direction of Louis- 
ville, but we were switched off on the Bardstown branch, 
reaching Bardstown about eleven o'clock, rejoining the left 
wing which brought the entire regiment together again, and 
which was never again separated. 

Bardstown was a place of about 1,000 or 1,200 inhabitants, 
county seat of Nelson county. The country surrounding was 
rather hilly, but fertile and the scenery beautiful. Near the 
town was a Catholic school and the sisters in charge were very 
friendly and rendered good service to the sick. 

The first thing Colonel Manson did was to gain the con- 
fidence of the people, and Union or "sesech" were friendly and 
hospitable toward the boys. On the 2nd day of October we 
moved our camp to Governor Wickliffe's pasture, camping on 
a side hill and using the meadow as a drill ground. Here we had 
to get down to business. Drills of all kinds and description 
was the rule and not the exception. On Sunday afternoons we 
had to drill about all the afternoon. Skirmish and battalion 
drills principally and as the citizens all turned out, white and 
black, the officers put us through "good and hard." We were 
on exhibition for the benefit of the citizens and the glory of 
the officers. It made no difference how hot or tired we were 



the entertainment must go on. After battalion drill came 
dress parade, this was the best part of the performance as we 
were at a "parade rest" and nothing to do but go through 
manual of arms, listen to orders and go to quarters. 

These drills were beneficial, as well as necessary and in 
due course of time the regiment became as proficient in the 
manual of arms and the various manceuvers as any regiment 
in the department, regulars not excepted. 

October 6th, John Auth, Company D, died from disease, 
and William Widener, Company C, was accidentally shot and 
killed, and were buried with military honors. These were the 
first deaths in the regiment, and the first military funerals ever 
seen by a majority of the regiment. Companies C and D 
marched in advance at a "reverse arms," then the remains fol- 
lowed by the regiment. Major Dan Conklin played the dead 
march, to the cemetery, after which a salute was fired, taps 
was then sounded, which signified that was the last of earth 
for Comrades Widener and Auth. 

October 8th. in accordance with the promise of Governor 
Morton we received our new Enfield rifles. They were beau- 
ties and the boys were correspondingly proud and felt that they 
were ready for any and all the "Johnnies" who felt disposed 
to get in front of them. There is always a feeling of security 
among men when they know they are properly armed, and 
know when in action their arms will not fail them in battle 
or on the skirmish line. The Enfields were English manufac- 
ture, the crown being impressed on the lock plate of them all. 
They were not as long as the Sprinfield rifle and weighed 




COMPANY "K'S" TEAM MARCHING WITHOUT ORDERS. 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



129 



about eleven pounds. They would carry about a mile with 
effect. The recoil or "kicking power" was about half that of 
the old Belgian blunderbusses, which favored the men in time 
of action. 

Owing to increasing sickness in the regiment, the court 
house was used as a hospital, which rapidly filled up. The 
majority of the sick being from the left wing, caused by stay- 
ing in Louisville a week or more, before moving to Bardstown. 
The stay at Bardstown was very pleasant. The regiment by 
its soldierly bearing and gentlemanly deportment had won 
the good will of all the people who deeply regretted our de- 
parture, and many shed tears when they bade us farewell. 

November 10th we received our first pay from "Uncle 
Sam." Eleven dollars per month, $22.00 in all. This payment 
consisted in silver, gold and paper money, and was the last 
gold and silver seen by the boys during our term of service. 
Greenbacks for large amounts and script for dimes, quarters 
and halves. 

On the nth we received marching orders, struck tents, 
and began loading the wagons. Haversacks and canteens were 
filled, knapsacks packed and in a short time the regiment was 
ready to march. The quartermaster had drawn wagons and 
mules, one wagon for headquarters, one for medical depart- 
ment, one for quartermaster's department, one for non-com- 
missioned staff and one for each company. Each team con- 
sisted of six mules driven by a single line. True to their na- 
ture the mules were disposed to be rebellious. The leaders 
winding themselves around the wheel mules. This caused 



whips to crack and the air was blue and smelled of sulphur 
from the profanity of the teamsters. This seemed to be the 
only language understood by the mules, and was about the 
only means by which order could be brought out of chaos. 
Company K's outfit ran away. Tom Peak, teamster; the out- 
fit was upset, spilling the contents, which had to be reload- 
ed. Sam Briley drove Company H's team. He had two wheel 
mules he called "Zollicoffer" and "Dixie." Sam had occasion 
to fix something about the doubletrees and while kneeling 
down, "Dixie" let fly one of his hind legs, striking Sam square 
in the face, splitting his nose, lips and chin and knocking out 
two teeth. Sam said everything except the Lord's Prayer, and 
with the butt end of his whip gave "Dixie" a blow that felled 
him to the ground. Giving him two or three good kicks, 
"Dixie" got up perfectly docile and Sam had no more trouble. 
The regiment then formed, "right faced" and marched 
out of camp to the tune of "Yankee Doodle." Passing the 
Catholic school, Dan Conklin struck up the "Gal I Left Be- 
hind Me," and after crossing the bridge we began the march 
in earnest to New Haven. Our hard service now began, and 
after marching a few miles the boys began to lag. Inexper- 
ienced they had packed their knapsacks with all sorts of traps 
that were of no consequence, and many began to throw away 
all unnecessary articles. After an eight mile march the straps 
of the knapsacks began to cut into the shoulders and by the 
time we were ready to go into camp the regiment looked as 
though it was composed of "hunchbacked" men, so heavy 
had the load become. We reached New Haven at dark, having 



130 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INEANTRY 



marched fifteen miles. The distance was too long for the 
first march, and should have been divided, half the distance 
the first day, the remainder the next. The men were so tired 
that many went to bed without waiting to get supper. Camp 




How the boys looked when they made their first march from Bardstown to New 
Haven, November, 1861. More property than sense. 

guard and pickets were detailed, the former useless, and 
should have been dispensed with. 

We remained at New Haven until November 17th, when 
we boarded the cars for Lebanon. The weather was cold and 
disagreeable. Arrived at Lebanon about 10 o'clock A. M., and 



arranged our camp. On the 18th our regulation uniforms 
were issued and we discarded the grey for the blue. 

Our camp was located on high ground, a small creek 
running along the bottom of the hill, which separated us from 
a nice meadow on the east, which we appropriated for a drill 
ground and dress parades. The camp was named "Camp 
Spalding." 

On the 19th we turned out for battalion drill. It was the 
custom of the field officers, after drill, to dismount, turn their 
horses loose and start them to camp, where their colored serv- 
ants would take charge of them. On this particular occasion 
the horses had reached camp and while we were holding dress 
parade, we heard a shot. Looking toward camp we saw the 
boys running toward the colonel's quarters, and knew there 
had been an accident, and someone had been hurt. In a few 
minutes a messenger came running out to the regiment and 
informed Lieut. Colonel Kise his son had been shot and killed. 
The boy, Elisha Kise, had come to Lebanon to visit his father 
and brother and had met his death. The parade was dismissed 
and the regiment hurried to camp. Everything was in a tur- 
moil, everybody excited and the facts of the case could not 
be learned. Some said the servant had shot him, and every- 
body wanted to hang the "nigger." Others said young Kise 
was to blame and that the shooting was accidental. The col- 
ored man was frightened out of his wits, and ran to a corn- 
field. The regiment started after him and surrounded the 
field, closed in on him and brought him to camp. Captain 
Gregory, Company F, had a rope and everybody was shouting 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



131 



to "hang him." Finally Colonel Manson mounted a cracker 
box and called "attention." The boys finally quieted down, he 
said : "Men of the Tenth, you who have executed every com- 
mand I have given, you who have obeyed every order I have 
issued, I now ask you and order you to go to your quarters. 
If this man is guilty he shall be punished, if innocent there is 
not a man in the Tenth who would see a hair of his head 
harmed. Every man to his quarters." 

This had the desired effect. The darkey was placed un- 
der arrest, taken to Lebanon jail, tried next clay by court mar- 
tial and acquitted. The evidence showed that when the horses 
reached camp, the servants always took the pistols from the 
holsters first and put them in the tent. This man had taken 
Colonel Rise's pistols out of the holsters, when he young man 
ran up playfully tried to take them away from him. In some 
manner one of them was discharged and young Kise fell dead. 
He was a bright, cheerful boy, beloved by all the regiment and 
his death was mourned many days. The remains were taken 
home to Lebanon, Indiana, accompanied by the colonel, his 
father, and brother. Adjutant Kise. 

"One of the most pleasing incidents of our service took 
place while at Lebanon, Ky. It was Sunday, December 8, 1861, 
a dark, chilly day, not unlike man)' which we have in Indiana, 
during the late fall when the wind pierces to the very marrow. 
The sun had not shown himself and the clouds looked as 
though charged with a heavy fall of snow. Matters were mov- 
ing along in the usual line when the sergeant major made the 
rounds of the companies announcing to each, that immediately 



after dinner there would be a flag presentation and that every 
man was expected to be in ranks in full uniform, clean and 
bright. All at once everything became hustle and hurry, for 
we had not yet worn off that attribute of the new soldier ; later 
we would not have changed an iota the visual routine, and the 
announcement of a flag presentation would scarcely have 
caused a ripple. But we were new and every man thought the 
flag was to be placed in his special care ; that to him more 
than any other was to be intrusted the preservation of the new 
flag. Every fellow donned clean shirts, brushed his clothes 
and shoes and turned his attention to his gun and accoutre- 
ments. Dinner over the bugler sounded the assembly and in 
less time than it takes to tell it, each company was ready. 

Before this a platform had been erected in the street to 
the north of the colonel's quarters, by placing planks upon 
camp stools. The regiment was formed in close column by 
companies at half distance, directly in front of the stand. The 
color bearer and color guards, with colors unfurled, took their 
position in the rear of the stand. As the formation was com- 
pleted Clonel Manson, accompanied by the Hon. W. S. Lingle, 
of LaFayette, Indiana, with several field and company officers 
of the Fourth and Tenth Kentucky regiments, appeared on 
the stand. Corporal Joe Carter, Company K, brought the new 
flag forward and placed it on the stand. Colonel Manson then 
took our old battle flag, the one carried through the three 
months service in West Virginia, which showed evidences of 
service in the numerous bullet holes through its folds, and 
placed it by the side of the new one. 



132 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



The new flag was made and presented to the regiment in 
the name of Misses Sallie Mansfield and Betty Crabb, of 
Louisville, Kentucky. These young ladies belong to two 
staunch Union families of that city, who often came out to see 
us drill and hold dress parade when at that city in September. 
Mr. Crabb had at one time been a citizen of Indiana, and after 
a prosperous business life had retired. Mr. Crabb was in 
active business in the city at that time. Quite an intimacy 
sprang up between the two families and the officers of the 
regiment, the latter being often entertained at their hospitable 
home on South Sixth street. Mr. and Mrs. Crabb are now 
dead. Miss Mansfield married a gentleman by the name of 
Bennett and removed to South Carolina. Miss Crabb subse- 
quently married a Confederate officer. All are now dead. The 
flag was of regulation size, fastened to a plain staff, surmount- 
ed by a spear head. The material was of the best and bound 
with gold fringe. In the blue field was a scroll containing the 
motto of our Union, "E Phiribus Unum," worked in gold 
thread, while the stars were silver and formed a cluster around 
the scroll. On the stripes was the following inscription : "Pre- 
sented by Sallie Mansfield and Betty Crabb to the Tenth Regi- 
ment Indiana Volunteers." 

Attention having been commanded by Lieutenant Colonel 
Kise, Mr. Lingle stepped forward and spoke as follows : 
"Colonel Manson and Soldiers of the Tenth : 

"I appear before you today under circumstances both 
novel and embarrassing to me. Before me I see faces that are 
familiar and who can testify that I never made a speech in my 



life. But upon an occasion like the present, it becomes neces- 
sary for me to offer a few remarks, at least in behalf of the 
noble ladies of Louisville who have presented to you this 
standard. It was their desire to come and present it to you in 
person, but hearing the smallpox was here, they shrunk from 
coming in contact with that loathsome disease, and when I 
looked at their peerless forms, their bright, rosy cheeks, their 
eyes full of Union fire, and their lips giving utterance to the 
patriotic effusions of their hearts, I did not wonder they shrank 
from the contaminating influences of that disease. 

"It was while I was up at Louisville partaking of the 
hospitalities of one of Kentucky's noble sons, I unexpectedly 
met them. While there they called upon me to present this 
emblem of our nationality to you in their name. In vain I 
remonstrated against such an undertaking; in vain I apologized 
— told them of my inability and unfitness for such a task, but 
all my efforts were unavailing. I am here. 

"Were I called upon to testify to the hardships of your 
life I would be but a poor witness. Last night I took supper 
with Colonel Manson, this morning I took breakfast with Lieut. 
Colonel Kise, at noon I dined with Captain Hamilton, and well 
might I exclaim, T am too full for utterance.' 

"Soldiers of the Tenth, in all my travels, wherever busi- 
ness or pleasure has called me. in Louisville and other places, 
I have heard you spoken of in the highest possible terms as 
gentlemen and soldiers. Wherever your orders have led you, 
you have been complimented for your fine appearance and 
noble bearing. To constitute a soldier in the eyes of Kentuck- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 

1 ~ 



133 



ians requires the embodiment of all that is noble and chivalrous. 
Gentlemen you are honored and applauded wherever your path 
has lain. Soldiers I know of nothing else that could be said 
more impressing for the occasion than to read a letter from 
the hearts and traced by the lovely hands that wrought this 
fair and gorgeous standard. (Mr. Lingle read the letter which 
the reporter failed to get). What can I say further? It 
speaks for itself. Had I the eloquence of a Clay or the pathos 
of a Marshall I could add nothing to it. It embodies those 
high and lofty principles which have actuated our country 
women to glorious deeds, during the short existence of this 
war. Your advent into this state is as bright as any written in 
the nomenclature of the 'Dark and Bloody Ground.' 

"In presenting you this flag I need not say that the strong 
arm of might will be put forth to defend it. Your achieve- 
ments or those who were in the three months service, have 
won for you a renown not to be dimmed, but brightened by 
your future. The folds of this flag presages for you a brilliant 
and glorious triumph and wins for you a speedy return to the 
haunts of peace." 

Colonel Manson replied as follows : 

"Mr. Lingle. I accept this flag. When this unnatural and 
fratricidal war broke out destroying the peace of our country, 
the men of Indiana nobly responded to the call of the President 
for aid in suppressing rebellion. This flag (taking hold of 
our old battle flag), the first one presented during the three 
months service in the good old state of Indiana, was wrought 
by the delicate fingers of your own cities' fair daughters, and 



by them given to us as a beacon to guide our footsteps through 
that campaign. I told them it should never be disgraced at 
my hands, and I have faithfully kept that promise. We car- 
ried it across the states of Indiana, Ohio and West Virginia. 
We first floated it on the soil of Indiana, next from Blenner- 
hasset's Island and finally on Virginia soil, in the face of trai- 
tors at Parkersburg ; we carried it over the heights surrounding 
Buckhannon ; we planted it on the loftiest peak of Laurel 
Mountains — at Rich Mountain — it waved in triumph and vic- 
tory over the enemy's works. And when the term of our 
enlistment had expired, and we were transported to our Hoo- 
sier homes, we had the satisfaction of knowing our flag waved 
triumphant over West Virginia. Its progress was a glorious 
triumph. After our return home and our people were again 
appealed to come forward, they responded in the greatest en- 
thusiasm. Under the lead of this flag we entered the 'Dark and 
Bloody Ground' to contend with traitors for its fair fields and 
lovely valleys. 

"Our advent here was hailed as a Godsend by the sons 
and daughters of Kentucky. Our flag was swept from Sump- 
ter by the hand of disloyalty; but I hope in the next two 
months to wave it from the domes of Nashville ; before May 
shall have dressed her days in all the splendors of spring it 
shall fly from the battlements of New Orleans. 

"Thus far this flag has been honored, revered, adored. 
I have kept my promise and while a man of the Tenth regiment 
lives they will defend it. 



134 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



"I have loved that banner. When yet a boy, before my 
head was silvered with the frosts of many winters, ere a grey 
hair had come to change the hue of my locks, I followed it 
with a fervent and reverent devotion. I followed it at the 
fall of San Juan de Ullioa ; I followed it up the Cerro del-fui 
ganto; I saw it in all the pride and pomp of victory wave on 
the balmy breeze over the Halls of Montezuma. With what 
love have I looked upon that starry banner and pride myself 
upon being a follower of its holy form. And here another 
idea presents itself. It is conceived by many in the South 
that this war is for the abolition of slavery. This is not so. 
It is a war for the maintenance of the Constitution and the 
Union. 'Hands off' is the doctrine and it will be faithfully 
lived up to. Here in the presence of a thousand men from 
Indiana, I utter these sentiments and call upon them to testify 
as to the truth. Time solves all problems and it alone will solve 
the question now before the American people. Had the men 
of this regiment thought this was a war for the abolition of 
slavery they never would have volunteered as they did. With 
this knowledge and belief of the war our Union soldiers have 
thrown their soul in their work and when I look upon that 
gorgeous standard, I am reminded of the great exertions and 
noble sacrifices of our true-hearted women. Woman in all 
ages of the world, have exceeeded man in works of nobleness 
and truth. Your true women, wherever you find them, are 
identified with all that is ennobling in your bloody revolutions, 
which like milestones mark the progress of the past, they have 
ever been on the side of right. 



"Now in this dark and trying hour of our country's peril 
will she desert her institutions? Her virtues, bright as the 
sparkling stars of heaven, stand forth the grandest ornament 
of any age. 

"Sir, I accept this flag. I pledge myself and those under 
my command, the Tenth Indiana, to maintain its folds unsullied 
by one act of treachery or dishonor. Where the glare of bat- 
tle blazes fiercest there shall it wave, followed by strong hands 
and brave hearts. Tell the fair donors of this standard that it 
shall float a proud monument of their patriotism." 

"Flag of the tree, hearts', home and hope 
By angel hands to valor given; 
Thy stars have lit the welkin dome, 
Thj r hues' were horn in heaven. 

Forever float that standard sheet, 
Where breaks the foe hut falls before us.; 
With freedom's soil beneath our feet 
And freedom's banner streaming o'er us." 

Mr. Lingle's speech was reported by William B. Hutton. 
Company D ; and Colonel Manson's by Alonzo Cowgill, Com- 
pany D. 

During our stay at Lebanon, our brigade was formed con- 
sisting of the Tenth Indiana, Fourteenth Ohio, Fourth and 
Tenth Kentucky Infantry, and Battery C, First Ohio Light 
Artillery, with Brigadier General George H. Thomas com- 
manding, and known as the Second Brigade, First Division, 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



135 



Department of the Ohio. The First Brigade, Brigadier 
General A. Schoepf commanding, consisted of the Seventeenth, 
Thirty-first and Thirty-eighth Ohio Infantry regiments and 
the Fifth Battery Michigan Light Artillery. Third Brigade, 
Second Minnesota, Ninth and Thirty-fifth Ohio, Eighteenth 
U. S. Infantry and Battery I, Fourth U. S. Artillery, com- 
manded by Colonel R. L. McCook, and on the 24th of December 
we were reviewed by Major General D. C. Bue'll, commanding 
the Department of the Ohio. 

December 25th was our first Christmas in the army ami 
the day was given over to hilarity and fun. A consignment of 
beer had been received which helped things along and by dress 
parade time it was a question whether it would be policy to 
hold one or not. The parade was held but it was more of a 
farce than anything else. Captain "Skid" Vanosdal, Company 
B, acted as adjutant. He was rigged out in a chapeau, epaulets 



and a lot of other trinkets never seen in the army — taking his 
place at the head of the regiment he gave the command: "At- 
tention Battalion !" "To the rear open order, march." This 
being done he gave the orders for the band to "sound off." 
When they returned he marched down in front of the colors, 
"about faced" gave the command "present arms." He then 
faced the colonel (Manson) saluted and said: "Sir, the parade 
is formed." Manson then ordered him "to your post, march." 
"Skid" then took his position to left and rear of the colonel. 
Manson omitted the manual of arms and ordered "Skid" to 
present the officers. "Officers to front and center, march." 
What Manson said no one could hear, but "Skid" announced 
the "parade dismissed" and Christmas was over. 

December 31, 1861, we were ordered to march and were 
to leave Lebanon, where we had made a good impression and 
left a good many friends. So ended the year 1861. 



CHAPTER IV 



March to Campbellsville, Kentucky 
Battle of Mill Springs 



WE left Lebanon about 10 o'clock A. M., December 
31, 1861, and camped on Deer Creek, and arrived 
at Campbellsville about two o'clock in the after- 
noon of January 1st, 1862. January 4th the regiment was or- 
dered on a scout to Greensburg to capture a Rebel camp, which 
proved to be a "wild goose chase." We then returned to 
Campbellsville. 

While at Campbellsville a slave owner came into camp and 
claimed a black boy cooking for a mess in Company A. The 
negro denied all knowledge of the white man and refused to 
go. Colonel Kise was appealed to and gave up the boy. A 
little later in the war and such a thing would have been im- 
possible. It was afterward learned the statement of the negro 
was true and the white man was in camp more in the capa- 
city of a spy than anything else. This episode caused a good 
deal of talk, but the men could not help themselves as what 
was done was in accord with the policy of the government and 
personal opinion of Colonel Hanson with whom it was under- 
stood Lieut. Colonel Kise was in full sympathy. 

January 8th, 1862, we left Campbellsville in a rain — in 
fact it rained all the time we were there. The pike from there 



on to Columbia was shoe-mouth deep in limestone mortar. 
The troops in advance had used the road for hauling supplies 
until the surface was worked up into a fine dust, when the 
rains coming, the constant stirring given it by the movement 
of the troops and teams worked it into a thin mortar, making 
travel disagreeable. We arrived at Columbia about noon. 
Here we found Russell's Creek booming and the bridge gone. 
The Michigan pioneers who were with us went to work and 
in the morning we crossed over. Then began the real hard 
work of the campaign and all will agree that the worst roads 
on the face of the earth at that time were between Columbia 
and Logan's Cross Roads. The mules sank to their bellies, the 
wagons to their axles, details were made to help the teams 
along, but our progress was very slow. 

On the 9th we marched four miles; on the 10th ten miles; 
on the nth four miles. General Thomas in reporting to Gen- 
eral Buell said: "It has taken us three days to make sixteen 
miles and that by the hardest kind of work." And he might 
have added truthfully "the country is one vast morass, the 
surface of which shakes by walking over it." The soil was 
about the color of the soap issued by the commissary and with' 



138 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



the boys it was a standing gag that we were making our move- 
ment to protect our soap supplies. The country from Colum- 
bia to Logan's Cross Roads was poor and barren, sparsely 
settled and the people very poor and ignorant. There were no 
crops, for whatever had been raised had been foraged by one 
or the other of the armies. 

January 12th, we marched four miles and had to pull 
wagons out of the mud. On the 13th four miles and went into 
camp on Goose Creek. On the 15th marched seven miles 
through mud and water and camped in an old orchard. On 
the 16th marched ten miles, the roads were terrible. On the 
17th started early in the morning passing the Ninth and Four- 
teenth Ohio regiments and went into camp at Webb's Cross 
Roads. Logan's for Webb's) Cross Roads was eight miles 
from Somerset and ten miles north of the Rebel works at 
Beech Grove on the Cumberland River. The Tenth Indiana 
having had the advance all day was immediately thrown for- 
ward on the direct road to the enemy's works, one mile in 
advance of the division. The Fourteenth Ohio and Tenth 
Kentucky under Colonel Steedman had been sent to the right 
on the Roberts Post Road to capture a forage train, reported 
in that direction, and did not, much to the chagrin of the offi- 
cers and men. get back to the division until after the battle 
of the 19th. 

As soon as we were halted on our camp grounds 
Companies E and G were thrown out well in front as pickets, 
remaining until the following morning when they were relieved 
by Companies C and D. At night (18th") C and D were re- 
lieved by Companies I and K. Colonel Frank Wolford with 



the First Kentucky Cavalry, who had joined us, kept videttes 
out in front of the infantry pickets. We slept on our arms 
prepared for work at short notice. 

As has been stated the Rebel army was intrenched at 
Beech Grove on the Cumberland river. Zollicoffer had been 
superceded by the appointment of Gen'l George B. Crittenden, 
a son of Hon. John J. Crittenden. The appointment had been 
made by the Rebel government for political effect. It was 
expected the name of Crittenden would bring many recruits 
into the Rebel ranks from Kentucky. Crittenden failed in 
everything expected of him ; was constantly drunk and gave 
little attention to details, leaving them to his staff and brigade 
commanders. It seems that our approach awakened him for 
the time being, and calling a council of his officers, it was de- 
termined to move out of their works and offer us battle before 
General Thomas could concentrate his division. General Crit- 
tenden says in his official report, "there was not an objection." 
He at once ordered the movement to begin at midnight, General 
Zollicoffer's brigade in advance. Rebel prisoners said Critten- 
den lied. That the advance was made over the protest of Zolli- 
coffer. Before it was light, January 19th, the advance of Crit- 
tenden's forces struck our cavalry outpost which fell back con- 
testing every inch of ground to the outer line of infantry pick- 
ets. A courier was immediately sent back to give the alarm. 
Zollicoffer had from 8,000 to 10,000 men in his command. 
The long roll sounded and in five minutes time the regiment 
was in line of battle and soon hotly engaged fighting a force 
ten times their number. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



139 



Colonel Kise moved the regiment forward through the 
woods to the inner line of pickets, our left resting on the road 
over which the enemy was advancing, our right reaching out 
into the timber which here was a growth of saplings and brush. 
The continual "zip," "zip," of the bullets soon settled the fact 
that the Tenth was engaged in a battle. For an hour and a 
quarter the regiment fought and no help from the rear. Find- 
ing the enemy likely to get in our rear", Lieutenant Colonel 
Kise gave orders to fall back which was done in good order 
and keeping up a constant firing. Having fallen back to the 
camp and getting a new supply of ammunition, General Thom- 
as came along and again ordered the regiment to the front, 
and in his official report intimated that we had not yet been 
on the field, which was a gross injustice to the regiment after 
having kept the Rebel army at bay for an hour and a quarter, 
solitary and alone. The regiment advanced to the line where 
the battle opened, and began the battle anew. The Fourth 
Kentucky then came up on our left, its right resting across 
the road on which our left had rested in the opening, while its 
left extended to the east in rear of an open field with a rail 
fence in their front for a cover. The enemy charged the 
Fourth Kentucky across the open field only to be repulsed. 
Zollicoffer getting in front of his men rode towards the right 
of the Fourth, begging them to desist from firing on their 
friends, when he was killed, at least three bullets struck him 
in the breast, any one of which would have been fatal. 

On the left of the Fourth Kentucky was Wolford's Cav- 
alry, dismounted, the Twelfth Kentucky and the First and 
Second East Tennessee Infantry ; while to our right came 



into battle the Ninth Ohio and Second Minnesota. A general 
forward movement was made along the entire line and the 
enemy gave way. There was no stop on the battlefield and 
the rout of the enemy was complete, before they got to their 
entrenchment at Beech Grove was more like a mob than an 
army. 

In the repulse of the enemy on the field of battle and the 
subsequent work in front of the entrenchments Standart's and 
Kenney's batteries did good work. With the Ninth Ohio and 
Second Minnesota we charged the enemy and drove him back 
half a mile and fought there an hour. General Zollicoffer was 
killed about ti o'clock in the morning by James Swan, of 
Company H, Tenth Indiana, he was also shot by Colonel Fry 
of the Fourth Kentucky. The enemy broke ranks and ran 
leaving their dead and wounded on the field. 

On the morning of the 20th we followed them to their 
breastworks on the Cumberland River, but could not get 
across after them. Some of them swam the river and a great 
many were drowned in the operation. They threw their guns 
and cartridge boxes as they ran to their breastworks and hoisted 
the while flag. We had 11 men killed and 79 wounded. James 
Keath, Company I, after fighting the battle through was the 
last man killed in the Tenth. He fell with his face toward the 
enemy. Ebenezer Dixon was struck on the side of the head 
near the temple. Mike Grady was shot through the upper part 
of the month and subsequently died. Oscar D. Shanklin was 
shot through the hand. The Tenth captured 40 prisoners and 
the other regiments as many more. Lieutenant Colonel Kise 
had his hat shot from his head. Wood Graham was run over 



140 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



by a cavalryman and slightly hurt and Lieutenant Shumate was 
also run over by a cavalryman and seriously hurt. John Payne 
got "scalped" above the right eye which knocked him down. 
The "rebs" were armed with old flint lock muckets. The "Mis- 
sissippi Rifles" and "Mississippi Tigers" were armed with the 
same kind of guns. We captured five Rebel surgeons. The 
"rebs" had to bury their own dead. They simply dug holes 
and put them in. In one grave they put 23 and never less than 
5 ; while we put an oil cloth around our dead. (The foregoing 
was taken from the diary of Robert R. Vest, Company I, and 
Alonzo Cowgill, Sergeant Company D). 

Reports of the Battle. 

Louisville, Ky., Jan. 20, 1862. 

"By telegraphic dispatches from General George H. Thom- 
as whom I had ordered to form a junction with Gen. Schoepf 
at Somerset, and attack General Zollicofrer, I have informa- 
tion that General Thomas was attacked by Zollicoffer's forces 
6 o'clock yesterday morning some eight miles west of Somer- 
set. He repulsed the enemy handsomely and drove him into 
his intrenchments at Mill Springs, capturing one piece of ar- 
tillery and four caissons. The enemy left 200 killed and wound- 
ed on the field. Among the killed are Zollicoft'er and Balie 
Peyton. The difficulty of supplying General Thomas' force in 
the present condition of the roads, and our limited transporta- 
tion is almost insurmountable. He has been on half rations 
for some days. D. C. Buell, 

Major General McClellan. Brigadier General. 



Louisville, Ky., Jan. 22, 1862. 

Major General McClellan, 

Commanding U. S. Army. 

The following (dated 21st inst.) just received from Gen- 
eral Thomas: "The rout of the enemy was complete. After 
succeeding in getting two pieces of artillery across the river 
and upward of fifty wagons, they were abandoned, with all 
the ammunition in depot at Mill Springs. They then threw 
away their arms and dispersed through the mountain by-ways 
in direction of Monticello. but are so completely demoralized, 
that I don't believe they will make a stand short of Tennessee. 

"I will forward General Schoepf's brigade to Monticello 
at once, if you desire it. Monticello is one of the strongest 
positions on the borders of Tennessee. 

The property captured on this river is of great value, 
amounting to 8 six-pounders and two Parrott guns with cais- 
sons filled with ammunition, about 100 four-horse wagons and 
upwards of 1200 horses and mules; several boxes of arms 
which have never been opened and from 500 to 1000 muskets, 
mostly flint locks, but in good order. Subsistence stores enough 
to serve the entire command for three days ; also a large 
amount of hospital stores. As soon as I receive reports of 
brigade commanders, will furnish detailed report of the battle. 

Our loss 39 killed and 127 wounded. Among the wound- 
ed were Colonel McCook, Ninth Ohio, commanding brigade 
and his aide Lieutenant Burt, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry. Loss 
of Rebels was Zollicoffer and 114 other killed and buried, 116 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



141 



wounded, 45 prisoners, not wounded, 5 of whom are surgeons, 
and Lieutenant Colonel Carter, Twentieth Tennessee Regiment. 

D. C. Buell, 
Brigadier General Commanding. 

Report oE General Thomas. 

Headquarters First Division, 

Department of the Ohio. 
Somerset, Ky., January 31, 1862. 
Captain. 

I have the honor to report that in carrying out the in- 
structions of the general commanding the Department, con- 
tained in his communication of the 29th of December, I 
reached Logan's Cross Roads, about ten miles of the intrenched 
camp of the enemy on the Cumberland river, on the 17th in- 
stant with a portion of the Second and Third Brigades, Kin- 
ney's battery of artillery and a battalion of Wolford's Cavalry. 

The Tenth Kentucky, Fourteenth Ohio and Eighteenth 
U. S. Infantry still in the rear, detained by the almost im- 
passable condition of the roads. I determined to halt at this 
point to wait their arrival and to communicate with General 
Schoepf. 

The Tenth Indiana, Wolford's Cavalry and Kinney's bat- 
tery took position on the road leading to the enemy's camp. 
The Ninth Ohio and Second Minnesota ("part of Colonel Mc- 
Cook's brigade) encamped three-fourths of a mile to the right 
on the Robert's post road. Strong pickets were thrown out in 
the direction of the enemy, beyond where the Somerset and 



Mill Springs road comes into the main road from my camp 
to Mill Springs, and a picket of cavalry some distance in ad- 
vance of the infantry. 

General Schoepf visited me on the day of my arrival and 
after consultation, I directed him to send to my camp, Stand- 
art's Battery, the Twelfth Kentucky and the First and Second 
Tennessee regiments, to remain until the arrival of the regi- 
ments in the rear. 

Having received information on the evening of the 17th 
that a large train of wagons with its escort were encamped 
on the Roberts post and Danville road, about six miles from 
Colonel Steedman's camp, I sent an order to him to send his 
wagons forward under a strong guard and to march with his 
regiment (Fourteenth Ohio) and the Tenth Kentucky, Colonel 
Harlan, with one day's rations in their haversacks, to the point 
where the enemy were said to be encamped, and either to cap- 
ture or disperse them. 

Nothing of importance occurred from the time of our ar- 
rival until the morning of the 19th, except a picket skirmish 
on the night of the 17th. The Fourth Kentucky, the Battalion 
of Michigan Engineers and Wetmore's battery joined the 18th. 
About 6 130 o'clock on the morning of the 19th the pickets from 
Wolford's Cavalry encountered the enemy advancing on our 
camp, retired slowly and reported their advance to Col. M. D. 
Manson, commanding the Second Brigade. He immediately 
formed his regiment (the Tenth Indiana) and took position 
on the road to await the attack, ordering the Fourth Kentucky 
(Col. S. S. Fry), to support him and informed me in person 



14-2 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



that the enemy were advancing in force and what disposition 
he had made to resist them. I directed him to join his brigade 
immediately and hold the enemy in check until I could order 
up the other troops, which were ordered to form immediately 
and were marching to the field in ten minutes afterward. The 
battalion of Michigan Engineers and Company A, Thirty- 
eighth Ohio, Captain Greenon, were ordered to remain in camp. 

Upon my arrival on the field soon afterward I found the 
Tenth Indiana formed in front of their encampment apparently 
awaiting orders and ordered them forward to support the 
Fourth Kentucky which was the only entire regiment then en- 
gaged. I then rode forward myself to see the enemy's position, 
so I could determine what disposition to make of my troops as 
they arrived. On reaching the position held by the Fourth 
Kentucky and Tenth Indiana and Wolford's Cavalry at a point 
where the roads fork, leading to Somerset, I found the enemy 
advancing through a cornfield and evidently endangering the 
left of the Fourth Kentucky, which was maintaining its position 
in a most determined manner. I directed one of my aides to ride 
back and order up a section of artillery and the Tennessee 
Brigade to advance on the enemy's right, and sent orders for 
Colonel McCook to advance with his two regiments (Ninth 
Ohio and Second Minnesota), to the support of the Fourth 
Kentucky and Tenth Indiana. 

A section of Capt. Kinney's battery took a position on the 
edge of the field to the left of the Fourth Kentucky and opened 
an efficient fire on a regiment of Alabamians, which were ad- 
vancing on the Fourth Kentucky, soon afterward the Second 



Minnesota arrived, the colonel reporting to me for instructions. 
I directed him to take the position of the Fourth Kentucky 
and Tenth Indiana, which regiments were nearly out of am- 
munition. The Ninth Ohio, under the immediate command of 
Major Kammerling, came into position on the right of the road 
at the same time. Immediately after these regiments had 
gained their position the enemy opened a most determined and 
galling fire, which was returned by our troops in the same 
spirit, and for nearly a half an hour the contest was maintained 
on both sides in the most obstinate manner. 

At this time the Twelfth Kentucky (Colonel Hoskins) 
and the Tennessee Brigade reached the field to the left of the 
Second Minnesota and opened fire on the right flank of the 
enemy who then began to fall back. 

The Second Minnesota kept up a most galling fire in front 
and the Ninth Ohio charged the enemy on the right with bay- 
onets fixed, turned their flank and drove them from the field, 
the whole line giving away and retreating in the utmost dis- 
order and confusion. As soon as the regiments could be 
formed and fill their cartridge boxes, I ordered the whole force 
to advance a few miles in rear of the battlefield. A small force 
of cavalry was drawn up near the road but a few shots from 
our artillery (a section of Standards Battery) dispersed them 
and none of the enemy were seen again, until we arrived in 
front of their intrenchments. As we approached their in- 
trenchments, the division was deployed in line of battle and 
steadily advanced to the summit of the hill at Moulden's. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



143 



From this point I directed their intrenchments to he can- 
nonaded, which was done until dark hy Standart's and Wet- 
more's Batteries. Kenney's hattery was placed in position on 
the extreme left at Russell's House, from which point he was 
directed to fire on their ferry, to deter them from attempting 
to cross. On the following morning Captain Wetmore's bat- 
tery was ordered to Russell's House and assisted with his Par- 
rott guns in firing upon the ferry. Colonel Manson's brigade 
took position on the left of Kenney's Battery and every prep- 
aration was made to assault their intrenchments on the follow- 
ing morning. The Fourteenth Ohio and Tenth Kentucky hav- 
ing joined from detached service soon after the repulse of the 
enemy continued with their brigade in pursuit, although they 
could not get up in time to join in the fight. These two regi- 
ments were placed in front in my advance on the intrench- 
ments the next morning and entered first. 

General Schoepf also joined me the evening of the 19th 
with the Seventeenth, Thirty-first and Thirty-eighth Ohio. His 
entire brigade with other troops. On reaching the intrench- 
ments we found the enemy had abandoned everything and re- 
tired during the night, twelve pieces of artillery with their 
caissons packed with ammunition, 1 battery wagon, and two 
forges, a large amount of ammunition, a large number of small 
arms mostly old flint locks, 150 or 160 wagons and upward of 
1000 horses and mules, a large amount of commissary stores, 
intrenching tools and camp and garrison equipage fell into our 
hands. A correct list of all the captured property will be for- 
warded as soon as it can be made up and the property secured. 



The steam and ferry boats having been burned by the 
enemy in their retreat, it was found impossible to cross the 
river and pursue them ; besides their command was completely 
demoralized, and retreated with great haste and in all directions, 
making their captures in any numbers quite doubtful if pur- 
sued. There is no doubt but what the moral effect produced 
by their complete dispersion will have a more decided effect in 
re-establishing Union sentiments than though they had been 
captured. 

It affords me much pleasure to be able to testify to the 
uniform steadiness and good conduct of both officers and men 
during the battle, and I respectfully refer to the accompanying 
reports of the different commanders for the names of those 
officers and men whose good conduct was particularly noticed 
by them. 

The enemy's loss as far as known is as follows : Brigadier 
General Zollicoffer, Lieutenant Balie Peyton, and 190 officers, 
non-commissioned officers and privates killed. Lieut. Colonel 
M. B. Carter, Twentieth Tennessee, Lieut. John W. Allen, 
Fifteenth Mississippi, Lieut. Allen Moore, Sixteenth Alabama, 
and five officers of the medical staff; 81 non-commissioned of- 
ficers and privates taken prisoners. Lieut. J. E. Patterson, 
Twentieth Tennessee and A. J. Knapp, Fifteenth Mississippi, 
66 non-commissioned officers and privates wounded ; making 
192 killed, 89 prisoners, not wounded, and 68 wounded, a total 
of killed, wounded and prisoners of 349. 



144 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Our loss was as follows : 



TROOPS 


Killed 


Wounded 




Officers 


Men 


Officers 


Men 


Tenth Indiana Infantry. . . 
First Kentucky Cavalry- ■ • 
Fourth Kentucky Infantry. 
Second Minnesota Infantry 
Ninth Ohio Infantry 


i 
i 


10 
2 

8 

12 

6 


3 

4 
2 

4 


72 

19 
48 

3i 
24 




2 


38 


13 


194 



A complete list of the names of our killed and wounded 
and of the prisoners is herewith attached. 
I am sir, very respectfully, 

Your obedient Servant, 

George H. Thomas, 
Brig. General U. S. Vols., Commanding 1st Division. 
Capt. J. B. Fry, A. A. G. and Chief of Staff, 

Headquarters Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky. 

Report of Colonel Mahlon D. Manson. 

Tenth Indiana Infantry, Commanding Second Brigade. 
Headquarters Second Brigade, First Division, 

Department of the Ohio. 
Camp near Mill Springs, Ky., January 27th, 1862. 
Sir: — I have the honor to transmit to you the following 
report of the part taken by the Second Brigade in the engage- 



ment with the enemy at Logan's field on the 19th instant. On 
the morning of the 17th instant, I took the advance of all the 
other troops on the march from Columbia toward the enemy's 
works, with the Tenth Indiana Infantry, and arrived at Logan's 
farm, distant about ten miles from the Rebel camp, on the 
Cumberland River, at 10 o'clock on that day. I immediately 
placed a strong picket consisting of two companies belonging 
to the Tenth Indiana and a section of artillery of Captain Ken- 
ney's battery under Lieut. Gary, two miles out on the road 
leading to the enemy's fortifications. About two o'clock on 
the morning of the 18th a few of the enemy's cavalry ap- 
proached and fired upon our pickets, which was returned by 
them and the enemy fell back. 

On the evening of the 18th I directed Lieut. Colonel Kise 
to send out two companies as pickets on the road to the camp 
of the enemy which he did. About daylight on the morning 
of the 19th the advance guard of the enemy came in sight of 
our extreme pickets and opened fire upon them. The fire was 
returned by the pickets who immediately afterward fell back 
to their companies. 

The picket companies having rallied held the enemy in 
check until a courier arrived at my quarters with information 
that the enemy were advancing with a very large force. I 
caused the long roll to be beaten. The Tenth Indiana was 
quickly formed and I ordered them to support the picket com- 
panies. I also ordered Captain Kenney's and Captain Standart's 
batteries to get in position to meet the advancing enemy. On 
arrival of the Tenth Indiana to the support of the pickets they 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



145 



immediately engaged three regiments of the enemy numbering 
about 2500 men and held their whole force in check for over 
one hour. As soon as I got the Tenth Indiana in position I 
proceeded to the camp of the Fourth Kentucky which was 
about three- fourths of a mile from my camp. I woke up Colonel 
Fry and ordered him to form his regiment and proceed toward 
the enemy. I then went to your quarters and informed you 
that the enemy was advancing upon us in force. I immediately 
returned to the field and found Colonel Fry with about 300 
men in the road leading to my camp. I directed him to push 
forward with his regiment without any further delay and take 
position in the woods on the left of the Tenth Indiana which 
he did, arriving there about one hour after the commencement 
of the battle, where his regiment did excellent service. I now 
gave orders to Captain Standart of the artillery, to throw some 
shells over the heads of our men to the place where I knew 
the enemy to be which he did with admirable effect. 

I now discovered that the enemy was bringing other forces 
into action, extending their lines and attempting to outflank us 
upon the right, seeing that no time was to be lost, I straight- 
way ordered Colonel Byrd's Tennessee regiment to take po- 
sition on the right of the Tenth Indiana, which order was about 
to be executed and the regiment was moving in the direction 
indicated, when they received an order from General Carter, 
commanding them to go and take position on the Somerset road 
to meet any portion of the enemy that might attempt to flank 
us in that direction. When I saw the Tennessee regiment leav- 
ing the field I immediately informed you of the fact when you 



directed me to order up Colonel McCook, Ninth Ohio and 
Second Minnesota, to take position on the right, which order I 
communicated to Colonel McCook, who moved forward with 
the two regiments of his brigade. You also ordered me to have 
a section of the battery taken upon the hill if possible, and in 
compliance with which and with great difficulty succeeded in 
getting upon the hill, when a heavy fire from the guns was 
opened on the enemy. 

In the meantime the Ninth Ohio, Second Minnesota, Tenth 
Indiana and Fourth Kentucky had kept up an unceasing fire 
upon the ranks of the enemy, who now began slowly to fall 
back, before our advancing forces. A portion of the enemy 
halted at a fence with evident intention of making a stand, 
when Colonel McCook commanded a "charge bayonets" which 
command was instantly repeated by Lieut. Colonel Kise of the 
Tenth Indiana, and was splendidly executed by both regiments. 
The enemy now gave away and fled in every direction in the 
utmost confusion, being hotly pursued by all your forces in the 
field. In accordance with your order, I started off to the left 
of the road through the fields and woods with the Tenth 
Indiana and Fourth Kentucky in pursuit of the retreating ene- 
my. I proceeded in this way until I struck the lower Fishing 
Creek road, about one mile from the main road leading to the 
enemy's fortifications. 

I turned and proceeded down the road until I formed a 
junction with your column and remained with you until we 
came in sight of the enemy's breastworks, where I halted my 
brigade until you had arranged your batteries upon the hills, 



146 



HISTORY OF THE; TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



commanding the Rebel camp. After the artillery had shelled 
the enemy's works for sometime, I received your order to 
move with my brigade to Russell's House on the north bank 
of the Cumberland river and prevent a flank movement of the 
enemy and gain an eminence which commanded a ferry at a 
point where the river divides the enemy's camp. I immediately 
occupied the place specified in your order with the Tenth In- 
diana, Fourth Kentucky, Fourteenth Ohio and Tenth Kentucky, 
Captain Kenney's battery of artillery, shortly afterward came 
by your order and took position on the hill at Russell's House 
with my brigade. Colonels Steedman and Harlan of the Four- 
teenth Ohio and Tenth Kentucky regiments had a forced march 
of 18 miles in six hours, overtaking us at the point where your 
column halted for the purpose of shelling the enemy. I very 
sincerely regret that you were deprived of these two gallant 
regiments in the battle. 

Their reports which I herewith transmit to you will fully 
explain why they were not with me on the morning of the en- 
gagement. At 10 o'clock on the night of the 19th I ordered 
the gallant Colonel Harlan with his regiment to advance and 
take possession of a hill half a mile from Russell's House 
which overlooked the camp of the enemy and to hold it at all 
hazard, and directed him at daybreak on the following morning- 
ing to take possession of the enemy's works, if it were ascer- 
tained that they had evacuated them. At 3 o'clock on the morn- 
ing of the 20th you directed me to send another regiment to 
the support of Colonel Harlan on the hill. I sent forward 
Colonel Steedman of the Fourteenth Ohio. At daylight Cols. 



Harlan and Steedman with their regiments took possession of 
the enemy's fortifications, the Rebels having deserted them 
during the night. In a very short time afterward the Tenth 
Indiana and Fourth Kentucky moved up into the deserted in- 
trenchments. My brigade after reaching the enemy's camp, 
took possession of 12 pieces of artillery, a large quantity of 
arms of every description, ammunition, commissary and quar- 
termaster's stores, horses, wagons, etc., all of which the enemy 
had abandoned in their flight. The panic among them was so 
great that they even left a number of their sick and wounded 
in a dying state upon the river bank. The loss of my brigade 
is as follows : 



Tenth Indiana 
Fourth Kentucky 

Total 



1 1 killed ; 79 wounded. 
4 " 52 " 



19 



131 



The enemy's loss in killed and wounded cannot be short 
of 800 and some intelligent prisoners estimate it as high as 1500 
in killed, wounded, prisoners and drowned in the river. 

The officers and men under my command behaved them- 
selves with coolness and courage during the entire engagement. 
Their gallantry and bravery never were excelled upon any 
battlefield and seldom equalled. In justice to the enemy I must 
say they exhibited a. courage and determination worthy of a 
better cause. General Zollicoffer, who commanded a part of 
their forces, fell while leading on his men, his body being 
pierced by three bullets. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



147 



I cannot close my report without mentioning the names of 
Lieut. Colonel Kise and Major A. O. Miller of the Tenth 
Indiana, who gallantly and bravely led forward their men and 
withstood the whole force of the enemy for one hour. Oliver 
S. Rankin, quartermaster of the Tenth Indiana, with his char- 
acteristic bravery and energy, organized his train for the pur- 
pose of advancing or retiring as the circumstances might re- 
quire, and promptly supplied the men of the Tenth Indiana 
with cartridges — from 60 to 75 rounds of which were fired by 
them during' the action. Captain A. C. Gillin, division quarter- 
master, who promptly organized an ammunition train and 
moved it on the field, and by his untiring exertions contributed 
greatly to our success, is deserving of the highest praise. 

Captain Geo. W. Roper, division commissary, merits great 
praise for his service on the field of battle for so promptly 
organizing his provision train which supplied the men with 
rations when they were almost exhausted. Captain R. C. Kise, 
my assistant adjutant general, who was of invaluable service 
in assisting and arranging troops on the field and communicat- 
ing my orders, is entitled to the highest praise and honors. 

Captain D. N. Steele, brigade quartermaster and Captain 
D. N. Nye, brigade commissary for faithful performance of 
their duties are entitled to credit. The gallant Colonel R. L. 
McCook, commanding the Third Brigade, I shall ever remem- 
ber with feelings of gratitude and admiration for the prompt 
manner in which he sustained me in the hour of trial. To 
Major Hunt, Fourth Kentucky, who exerted himself in cheer- 
ing on his men and giving them every encouragement and as- 



sistance great honor and praise should be accredited. In jus- 
tice to my own feelings I cannot close this report without con- 
gratulating the commanding general of this division on the 
splendid victory achieved over the rebel forces under his com- 
mand at Logan's Field. The number of the enemy's forces 
engaged in battle must have been over 8000 men, while the 
Federal force actually engaged did not eceed 2500. All the 
papers and plans of the late General Zollicoffer have fallen into 
my hands which I have preserved for future use of the gov- 
ernment. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

Mahlon D. Manson, 
Colonel Commanding 2nd Brigade, 1st Div. Dept of the Ohio. 
Brig. General George H. Thomas, 

Commanding 1st Division Department of the Ohio. 

Report of Lieut. Colonee Wileiam C. Kise. 
Tenth Indiana Infantry. 
Camp Opposite Mill Springs, Wayne Co., Ky. 
January 23, 1862. 
Sir : — I have the honor to report to you the part taken by 
the Tenth Indiana, under my command in the battle fought 
on the 19th instant at Logan's Farm, Pulaski County, Kentucky. 
On the evening of the 18th instant in accordance with your 
orders I sent out as pickets Companies I and K, Captains Per- 
kins and Shortle, and had them posted on the road leading 
to the fortifications of the enemy on the Cumberland River, 



148 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



about 12 miles distant. Major A. O. Miller, who posted the 
pickets, stationed Company I one mile from our camp and 
Company K 300 yards beyond. The latter Company received 
instructions to fall back to Captain Perkins if attacked. 

At about 6 .-30 o'clock on the morning of the 19th a courier 
came to our quarters with information that the enemy was 
advancing upon our camp, and almost immediately afterward, 
the firing of our pickets was heard. The long roll quickly 
brought the Tenth Regiment into ranks, and I gave orders to 
Major Miller to go forward with Company A, Captain Hamil- 
ton, to support the picket companies, which order was promptly 
executed. 

I soon proceeded by your order with the remaining seven 
companies of my regiment down the road in the direction of 
the picket firing, when I got within 75 yards of the three com- 
panies then hotly engaged, I formed the regiment in line of 
battle and rapidly disposed of it for fighting. 

Five companies extended through the woods on the right 
of the road, and the remaining companies on the left. A reg- 
iment of Rebels were advancing in line of battle and their 
treasonable colors were seen flaunting in the breeze. Having 
selected as good a position as practicable, I took a stand and 
ordered the regiment to fire, which order was obeyed instantly. 
The firing continued without cessation for one hour, during 
which time we engaged three of the enemy's regiments and 
held them at bay. The battle was at its hottest and our ranks 
were gradually becoming thinned and mutilated, when I per- 
ceived a regiment of cavalry attempting to flank me on the 



right and an infantry regiment on the left. I commanded Cap- 
tain Gregory's company to take position to meet the cavalry 
on the right which it did opening a galling fire upon them, but 
they were fast closing in upon us, and I saw myself completely 
outflanked on the right and that re-enforcements must soon 
come to my relief or I would be compelled to fall back. I was 
eventually forced to order my right wing to retire, when just 
as my order was being executed the Fourth Kentucky, com- 
manded by Colonel Fry, came up and took position on the left 
of my left wing and opened a deadly fire on the ranks of the 
enemy. 

I now rallied the right wing, the men, with the exception 
of those who had been detailed to carry off the dead and 
wounded, quickly taking their places in the line. Just at this 
moment a heavy force appeared to be advancing on the ex- 
treme left of the Fourth Kentucky and a portion of Colonel 
McCook's brigade which arrived, engaging the enemy on my 
right, I was ordered by General Thomas to the extreme left 
of the Fourth Kentucky. I moved the regiment through the 
brush and over logs to the place designated, and coming to a 
fence parallel with my line we hotly engaged the enemy and 
after a hard struggle of half an hour's duration drove him 
before us and put him to flight with great loss. A part of my 
left wing was still engaged on the right of the Fourth Kentucky 
against great odds being strongly opposed, I was again ordered 
by General Thomas to their support. I forthwith obeyed this 
command and in doing so brought my right wing upon the 
identical ground it had been forced to abandon during the ear- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



149 



Her part of the engagement. I then moved forward the whole 
right wing and two companies of the left and soon got into a 
fierce contest with the enemy in front. The whole regiment 
from right to left was now warmly engaged and slowly but 
surely driving the enemy before them when I ordered a "charge 
bayonets" which was promptly executed along the whole line. 
We soon drove the enemy from his place of concealment in the 
woods into an open field 200 yards from where I ordered the 
charge. When we arrived at the fence in our front many of 
the enemy were found lingering in the corners, and were bay- 
oneted by my men between the rails. I pressed onward and 
soon beheld with satisfaction that the enemy were moving in 
retreat across the field, but I suddenly saw them halt in the 
southeast corner of the field on a piece of high ground, where 
they received considerable re-enforcements and made a last 
desperate effort to repulse our troops. 

In the meantime the gallant Colonel McCook with his in- 
vincible Ninth Ohio came to our support and for twenty or 
thirty minutes a terrific struggle ensued between the two op- 
posing forces. I never in all my military career saw a harder 
fight. 

Finally the enemy began to waver and give back before 
the shower of lead and glittering steel brought to bear on his 
shattered ranks and he commenced a precipitate retreat under 
a storm of bullets from our advancing forces until his retreat 
became a perfect rout. I ordered enough of our men left to at- 
tend to our dead and wounded and receiving a new supply of 
cartridges (the most of our boes being entirely empty) the 



men refilled their boxes and according to your order, I put the 
regiment in motion after the retreating enemy. Pursuing them 
the same evening a distance of ten miles, we arrived near the 
enemy's fortifications at this place. The way by which the 
enemy had retreated gave evidence that they had been in haste 
to reach their den. Wagons, cannon, muskets, swords, blankets, 
etc., were strewn all along the road from the battlefield to with- 
in a mile of this place, where I halted the regiment and the 
men slept on their arms in the open field. 

The men at this time were powder besmeared, tired and 
hungry, having had nothing to eat since the previous night. 
On the following morning — the 20th instant, after our artillery 
had shelled the enemy's works, by your order I moved my 
regiment to his breastworks and into his deserted intrench- 
ments where I have since remained. It may be interesting to 
state here that our regimental colors, which were those pre- 
sented to us by the ladies of LaFayette and borne in triumph at 
the Battle of Rich Mountain, were completely torn into shreds 
by the bullets of the enemy. I have had its scattered frag- 
ments gathered and intend preserving them. Three stands of 
Rebel colors were captured by my regiment. 

I cannot speak in sufficient terms of praise of the noble 
and gallant conduct of some of the officers of my regiment. 
They did their duty and fought like tried veterans. Major A. 
O. Miller was wherever duty called him in the thickest of the 
fight, cheering the men. Acting Adjutant W. E. Ludlow did 
his whole duty and rendered me valuable assistance during the 
day. Assistant Surgeon C. S. Perkins and the Rev. Dr. 



!50 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Dougherty, chaplain of the Tenth Regiment, rendered valuable 
service in their unremitting attention to the wounded. Quarter- 
master Oliver S. Rankin and Nelson B. Smith of the same de- 
partment are entitled to great credit for the prompt manner 
in which they brought up and supplied the men with cartridges. 
Commissary Sergeant David B. Hart, our Rich Mountain 
guide in the three months service, was present in the line of 
his duty. Fife and Drum Majors Daniel and James S. Conk- 
lin shouldered muskets and fought valiantly during the early 
part of the engagement, after which they were of great serv- 
ice in carrying off and attending to the wounded. Captains 
Hamilton, Boyle, J. F. Taylor, Carroll, Gregory and Captains 
M. B. Taylor, Perkins and Shortle, the three "young tigers," 
were through the entire battle where none but the brave and 
gallant go and continually pressed forward with their men, 
where the battle raged the hottest and the Rebels found most 
plenty. Captain Vanarsdal, Co. B, was present and discharged 
his duty faithfully until after the right wing was drawn off. 

First Lieutenants Cobb, Goben, McAdams, VanNatta, 
Johnson, McCoy, Bush, Boswell, Shumate and Hunt, deserve 
the highest praise for their brave and gallant conduct. Lieu- 
tenant McAdams fell while he was nobly leading on his men. 
Lieutenant Bush commanded Co. G and quite distinguished 
himself. 

Second Lieutenants Rodman, Colwell, Merritt, Lutz, Mil- 
ler, Simpson, Scott and Wilds fully merit all that can be said 
in their praise, as do all the non-commissioned officers and 
privates, that were present during the engagement. 



Many individual acts of bravery might be mentioned, such 
as those of Ordnance Sergeant Miller of Co. B and my orderly 
Abraham A. Carter, who took a gun and fought manfully dur- 
ing the intervals his services were not required by me in dis- 
patching orders. 

But nothing I can say will add to the well merited laurels 
already on the brows of both officers and men of the Tenth 
Indiana Volunteers. 

My regiment lost in killed n; wounded 75, a complete 
list of whose names I herewith submit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. KiSE, 
Lieut. Colonel Commanding Tenth Indiana Infantry. 
Col. M. D. Manson, 

Commanding 2nd Brigade, 1st Division Dept. of the Ohio. 

The following account together with the map was taken 
from the Louisville Journal and is supposed to have been writ- 
ten by Lieut. Lewis Johnson, Co. E, who drew the map : 

Headquarters Tenth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry- 
Mill Springs, Feb. 7, 1862. 

"Dear Sir : — We left Lebanon on the 31st day of December 
and marched to Campbellsville ; from there we made a forced 
march to Greensburg, twelve miles, in less than four hours, 
and returned the next day in about the same time. The ex- 
pedition turned out to be a "wild goose chase." On 'or about 
January 7 we started for Columbia, where we arrived in two 
days. After resting three or four days we struck tents and 
started for Zollicoffer's intrenchments. After some six or 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



ISI 



eight days hard traveling we arrived at Logan's Cross Roads, 
where the fun commenced. Friday afternoon we sent out as 
pickets Company A, Captain Hamilton ; at night Company E, 
Captain Carroll, and Company G, Captain Hoagland. About 
twelve o'clock that night the enemy's pickets and Company E 
met and exchanged shots ; the regiment was in less than five 
minutes in line of battle, but the enemy retreated and we re- 
tired to bed again. The next morning Company C, Captain 
Boyle, and Company D, Captain Joseph T. Taylor, were sent 
out to' relieve Companies E and G. During Saturday nothing 
of importance occurred. At night Company I, Captain Perk- 
ins, and Company K, Captain Shortle, relieved Companies C 
and D. During the night, which was very stormy, everything 
was quiet. At six o'clock Sunday morning Captain Perkins 
came in and reported everything quiet. Hardly had he got 
away from the tent when one of Wol ford's Cavalry rode up 
and said our pickets were firing. The long roll was instantly 
beat, and the boys started at double quick. The regiment took 
position marked (2), which they held until the enemy had com- 
pletely outflanked us. We fought over 3000 for over half an 
hour. We retreated to (3). In the meantime the Fourth Ken- 
tucky came up. We then pushed forward to (4) with the 
Fourth Kentucky at our right (8). We fought here for nearly 
an hour, when finding the enemy's cavalry trying a flank move- 
ment on us, we moved, by General Thomas' orders to (5), 
where we fought desperately at least an hour. At this time 
Colonel Manson saw that the enemy were again trying a flank 
movement to our right ; ordered that McCook should bring 



his men to our relief. The Second Minnesota (9) moved for- 
ward and took position at (10), from thence forward to (11), 
driving the left flank of the enemy in. The Ninth Ohio (12) 
came up and drove the right flank in. Our regiment then went 
forward to (6), when Colonel Kise ordered "charge bayonets" 
which was done with a will, and everything went before us. 
Our next position was at (7) ; it was here that the old Tenth 
did the best execution with the guns they received while in 
your town, (Bardstown). At the little house you see marked 
at the left of (7) Company E, Captain Carroll killed twenty-- 
one men. We fairly mowed them down in that open field. The 
Ninth Ohio (13) was carrying on the same kind of business 
on the other side of the road. The order was again given to 
charge bayonets, which was done by the Tenth Indiana and 
Ninth Ohio in splendid style. Secesh was now completely 
played out, and they all struck for their den. The "double 
quick" we practiced so much at Bardstown was no compari- 
son to theirs, in that respect they are much better drilled than 
we. We followed them, occasionally giving them a shell to 
hurry them up a little. At about 4 o'clock we arrived within 
shelling distance of their intrenchments, and commenced giving 
them a f ew •; but night coming on we decided to rest. We had 
started off in the morning before breakfast and had eaten noth- 
ing all day. We received a few crackers, and the boys laid 
themselves down on the damp ground (it having rained all 
day). In the morning Wetmore's Battery was ordered up to 
shell a steamboat which we saw crossing the river. We shot 
with two Parrott guns a distance of about two miles. We 



-« m 



■k 




HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



153 



however had shot but a few times when we noticed the steamer 
on fire. Our regiment with the Tenth Kentucky, Fourteenth 
Ohio and Fourth Kentucky (Manson's Brigade), were then 
ordered by General Thomas to take possession of the intrench- 
ments. The Tenth Kentucky, Colonel Harlan, was the first to 
enter, the Fourteenth Ohio next, then came ours. We found 
everything left. Horses stood saddled and bridled ; teams 
were hitched up; the horses were standing attached to the can- 
nons ; officers' trunks were found strewn on the bank of the 
river. 

We took about 2,000 head of horses and mules, 250 wag- 
ons, 14 cannon, two of which were captured by them from us 
at Bull Run, some 4000 or 5000 stand of arms and any num- 
ber of flags, Company H, Captain Marsh B. Taylor, one silk 
flag. You have seen it reported in the papers that Colonel Fry 
and Zollicoffer had some conversation, and that Fry shot Zol- 
licoft'er. This is a great hoax. Zollicoffer was shot three 



times ; the ball that killed him was from an Enfield rifle and 
entered his heart. The shot was fired by Corporal James Swan 
of Company H, who is a dead shot, and the same person who 
shot the man one night in the shoulder in your town. I am, 
Judge, very proud to be in the Tenth Indiana and also very 
proud of the officers. They are all very brave. Colonel Kise 
and Major Miller can't be beat anywhere. Colonel Manson 
was the hero of the day and managed everything in splendid 
style. We lost but one officer, Lieutenant McAdams, who was 
shot in the forehead and killed instantly. Lieutenant Johnson 
was wounded in the left arm. Some of the men were wound- 
ed, and after having their wounds bound up went into the field 
again. At one time we were so close to the enemy that we 
bayoneted them through the fence. The Mississippians were 
armed with great knives which they intended using on us, but 
our bavonets out-reached their knives." 



LIST OF KILLED AND WOUNDED 



Tenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry at the Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky 

January 19th, 1862 



Field and Staff. 
Wounded 
Major A. O. Miller. 

COMPANY A. 
Captain J. H. Hamilton, Commanding. 

Killed 

Private William Bennett. 

Wounded. 

" Ira A. Lynch. 

" John F. Payne. 

" Uriah Starbuck. 

COMPANY B. 
Captain James H. Vanosdol, Commanding. 

Killed. 
Private James E. Copner. 
" Amos K. Misner. 
Wounded, 
ist Sergeant Isaac F. Miller. 
3d John W. Hogsett. 



Private George W. Bradford. 
Zebulon Brown. 
Zephana H. Crane. 
Samuel M. Craig. 
Isaiah Ferguson. 
Jesse Ferguson, Jr. 
William O. Higgins. 
Thomas Hunt. 
Thomas Landis. 
David B. Lynn. 
George B. Marlow. 
Andrew Ochiltree. 
William Y. Porter. 
James A- Shoemaker. 
John R. Simpson. 
Thomas J. Simpson. 
David A. Stonebraker. 
Benjamin M. Vancleve. 
'Martin V. Wert. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



155 



COMPANY C. 
Captain James H. Boyl, Commanding. 

Killed. 
Lieut. James H. HcAdams. 

Wounded. 
Private Jeremiah Batterton. 
Thomas Brooks. 
" Joseph J. Goar. 
Henry Hammel. 

COMPANY D. 

Captain Joseph F. Taylor, Commanding. 

Wounded. 

Private Elisha Little. 

" James Sauster. 

COMPANY E 
Captain William B. Carroll, Commanding. 
Killed. 
Private Nelson D. Anderson. 
Wounded. 
Lieutenant Lewis Johnson. 
Corporal Lewis A. Corcoran. 
Private Jenners Baer. 
Jacob Bowers. 
" William W. Collins. 
" Henry Kreicheldorf. 
" Singleton Reynolds. 
" William Vaughn. 



COMPANY F. 

Captain Benjamin F. Gregory, Commanding. 

.Killed. 

2d Sergeant William P. Larimore. 
Private George W. Lee. 
" William H. Wood. 
Wounded. 
Lieutenant Israel H. Miller. 
Corporal William P. Windiate. 
John W. French. 
Private William B. Carson. 
" George F. L. Essex. 
" John L. Hoover. 
" William A. Hunt. 

COMPANY G. 
Lieutenant Jacob H. Bush, Commanding. 

Wounded. 
Private William Daily. 

John Gillin. 
" John W. Mosier. 
" John Sprague. 
" Joseph H. Timmons. 
" James C. Truett. 
" John A. Underbill. 

Dryden Vankirk. 



i56 



HISTORY 01? THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



COMPANY H. 

Captain Marsh B. Taylor, Commanding. 

Killed. 

Private Noah Dota. 
" Erastus Dewey. 

Wounded. 

3d Sergeant James Swan. 
Private William Arthur. 

James Bowley. 

William J. Evans. 
" Daniel Hale. 
" Frederick Lingo. 
" Thomas J. Patterson. 
" Patrick Rowley. 
" Levi H. Scott.' 
" William J. Stone. 

COMPANY I. 
Captain Jehu W. Perkins, Commanding. 
Killed. 
Private James Keath. 
Wounded. 
Lieutenant Felix Shumate. 
2d Sergeant Ira S. Perkins. 
2d Corporal Harvey C. Price. 
Private Ebenezer Dixon. 



Daniel Daugherty. 
Michael F. Grady. 
" Oscar D. Shanklin. 
Oliver M. Strahan. 

COMPANY K. 
Captain Samuel H. Shortle, Commanding. 
Wounded. 
6th Corporal James T. Doster. 
Private William Baum. 

" David W. Downard. 
" George Lucas. 
" Eli T. Michael. 
" James Wallace. 
" John M. Wellman. 

Congratulatory' Order from the President. 

War Department, January 22, 1862. 

The President, Commander-in-Chief of the Army and 
Navy has received information of a brilliant victory by the 
United States forces over a large body of armed traitors and 
rebels at Mill Springs in the State of Kentucky. 

He returns thanks to the gallant officers and soldiers who 
won that victory and when the official reports shall be received 
the military and personal valor displayed in the battle will be 
acknowledged and rewarded in a fitting manner. 

The courage that encountered and vanquished the greatly 
superior numbers of the Rebel force, pursued and attacked 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



157 



them in their intrenchments and paused not until the enemy 
was completely routed, merits and receives commendation. 

The purpose of this war is to pursue, attack and destroy 
a rebellious enemy and to deliver the country from dangers 
menaced by traitors. 

Alacrity, daring, courageous spirit and patriotic zeal on 
all occasions and under every circumstance are expected 
from the army of the United States. 

In the prompt and spirited movements and daring at the 
battle of Mill Springs, the Nation will realize its hopes, and 
the people of the United States will rejoice to honor every 
solider and officer who proves his courage by charging with 
the bayonet and storming intrenchments, or in the Maze of the 
enemy's fire. 

By Order of the President, 

Edwin M. Stanton, 

Secretary of War." 

Thus ended the battle of Mill Springs. The most decisive 
victory up to that time. No battle was fought during the war 
where the enemy was so completely "thrashed," routed and put 
to ignominious flight as in this engagement. In 1863 at Stew- 
art's Creek, Tenn., citizens told us the Fifteenth Mississippi 
never did stop running. The victory was important from the 
fact that it completely broke the center of the Rebel army. 
The right of the Rebel forces rested in Virginia, the center in 
Kentucky and Tennessee and the left on the Mississippi River. 
The small force under General Thomas completely annihilated 
this center, and routed and demoralized their forces beyond 
reorganization. The Rebel General Crittenden reported offici- 



ally that his force consisted of the following troops: The 
Seventeenth, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-seventh Tennessee In- 
fantry, First Battalion Tennessee Cavalry, two companies Third 
Battalion Tennessee Cavalry and four pieces of artillery. This 
constituted the First Brigade. Second Brigade, Fifteenth Mis- 
sissippi, Sixteenth Alabama, Nineteenth, Twentieth, Twenty- 
fifth and Twenty-ninth Tennessee Infantry, two Battalions 
Tennessee Cavalry, two Independent Cavalry Companies and 
twelve pieces of artillery, yet in the same report he says he was 
met by an "overwhelming" force of the enemy (Union). Gen- 
eral Thomas had four regiments of infantry and two batteries 
of artillery. The comparison of the number of regiments en- 
gaged on both sides will settle the question as to superiority 
of the force on either side. 

General Crittenden reports officially his losses as follows : 



TROOPS 


Killed 


Woun'd 


Missing 


Total 


Fifteenth Mississippi 


44 


153 


29 


226 


Twentieth Tennessee 


33 


59 


18 


no 


Nineteenth Tennessee 


10 


22 


2 


34 


Twenty-fifth Tennessee 


10 


28 


17 


55 


Seventeenth Tennessee 


11 


25 


2 


38 


Twenty-eighth Tennessee 


3 


4 


5 


12 


Twenty-ninth Tennessee 


5 


12 


10 


27 


Sixteenth Alabama 


9 


5 


12 


26 


Captain Sanders' Cavalry 


125 


1 




1 




309 


95 


529 




o 
o 

6 




THE TREE AT LEFT OF MONUMENT IS WHERE ZOLLIOOFFER FELL. THIS SHOWS PART OF THE BATTLEFIELD. 




THE LADIES ON EACH SIDE OP THE MONUMENT ARE ZOLLICOFPER'S DAUGHTERS 
PRESENT AT DEDICATION. 




BENEATH THIS MOUND ARE BURIED MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED CONFEDERATE SOLDIERS. 



1 62 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



After the battle the regiment moved across the Cumber- 
land River and took possession of the log cabins previously 
built and occupied by the Rebels. Among the commissary 
supplies captured were several hogsheads of sugar and a large 
amount of flour. The boys lived on "flapjacks" and sugar 
syrup principally, but owing to the fact that the eggs and milk 
were missing they were simply indigestible and caused much 
sickness and bowel troubles. They became experts, however, 
in baking them. They were made the size of a frying pan and 
instead of turning them with a knife or paddle, they would 
shake them loose and throw them in the air to turn them and 
catch them dough side down. "Practice makes perfect," and 
so adept did they become, that almost invariably the flapjack 
would turn in the air and land "dough side down" in the fry- 
ing pan. This saved time, besides the fun of seeing who could 
throw the highest and land the "jack" right side clown in the 
skillet. 

Owing to the mud, rain and inclement weather a great 
deal of sickness prevailed. There were some forty cases of 
typhoid fever,, besides remittent, and intermittent fevers, rheu- 
matism and bowel troubles. They were anxious tp get out of 
that mud hole and on the nth of February, 1862, we pulled 
stakes and started for Louisville, leaving the worst cases of 
sickness and our wounded at Somerset. On the 13th we 
marched through a town called Cuba, a tough looking place 
and tough looking citizens. We marched fourteen miles that 
day. Wood and water were scarce. We arrived at Stamford, 
Ky.j on the 15th. Snow on the ground, camped in a nice 



meadow near a large two story white house. Had plenty of 
nice straw, and the owner of the plantation sold a barrel of 
"apple jack" to the regiment, which was delicious to the taste 
but made the boys very "sleepy." Arrived at Danville on the 
17th. At this point the city authorities seized Colonel Kise' 
colored servant (who had fought in the battle) and put him 
in jail. Colonel Kise swore he would pull the jail down if 
the servant was not released at once. The "authorities" soon 
acceded to the demand. On the 19th we arrived at Lebanon 
and no one ever saw it rain harder. No wind, but the water 
simply came down in streams about the size of a wheat straw. 
We marched in sections at a carry arms, and the muskets car- 
ried with the hammer down on the tube filled the gun barrels 
half full of water. Our reception at this point was chilly. 
We arrived at Bardstown on the 20th and were royally re- 
ceived by the citizens, who brought baskets of provisions, 
tobacco and pails of "apple jack." On the 24th we resumed 
the march passing through Springfield, Fredericksburg and 
Portland. 

On the 26th we were aroused at one o'clock a. m., got 
breakfast and at two o'clock pulled into the road for the "last 
lap" for Louisville. 

We had just got fairly started when the Fourteenth Ohio 
caught up with us ami attempted to pass us. This caused a 
rumpus, considerable quarreling and some fighting, especially 
in the left wing. Colonel Manson told Steedman he had better 
halt. his regiment and let the Tenth pass or he might not have 
any regiment when he reached Louisville. Steedman then 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



163 



gave the order for the Fourteenth Ohio to halt and let the 
"Tenth Indiana pass." We saw nothing more of them that day 
and arrived at Louisville about three o'clock in the afternoon 
and went into camp on a hill at the foot of Broadway. On the 
27th we marched down to the Gait House where we were 
presented with a beautiful flag by the ladies of Louisville. 
After these ceremonies were over we resumed the march to 
the Ohio River — the right wing embarking on the steamer 
"Glendale," the fastest boat on the river at that time. The 
left wing boarded the steamer "Lady Pike" and started down 
the river at 8 o'clock that night. The right wing left at 8 
lo'clock the next morning and passed the "Lady Pike" at 
Evansville about eleven o'clock that night. 

February 28th we reached Smithland at which point the 
Cumberland River empties into the Ohio, and March 1st at 10 
o'clock in the morning we headed up the Cumberland for 
Nashville, Tenn. We passed the steamer "Economy," which 
had struck a snag and sank with the Ninth Ohio on board. 
They lost one man and twenty-seven mules. 

The excessive rains had raised all the rivers and streams, 
flooding the entire country from Louisville to Nashville. On 
the "Glendale" we had a steam calliope and the man who 
played it was a full-blooded sesech and he continually played 
"Dixie," "Bonnie Blue Flag," "Maryland, My Maryland," and 
other Rebel airs until the boys became very tired and weary 
of the music. They called on the gentleman and told him to 
play some Yankee tunes which he refused to do. They then 
gave him the choice of plaving national airs or be thrown over- 



board in the river. Considering discretion the better part of 
valor, he fingered the machine until our arrival at Nashville, 
giving us all the national airs, jigs, etc., we ever heard. Our 
trip down the river was anything but pleasant. We had no 
way of making coffee except to go down to the engine room 
and get hot water out of the cylinders, and this was greasy 
and oil)'. Our bacon we cooked by placing on a ramrod and 
sticking in the coal stove of the main cabin. Of course there 
was a stream of grease around the stove, which made the 
captain swear like a pirate. 

March 3rd we reached Nashville about 7 o'clock in the 
morning. We disembarked and marched up town. The streets 
were deserted so far as citizens were concerned. All who could 
go, had "skedaddled." The darkies said that merchants threw 
'open the doors of their stores and told people to help them- 
selves. Many of the poorer classes had brussels carpets on 
the floors of their shanties, grocers gave them all the groceries 
they could carry away, saying the Yankees were coming, they 
would rob their stores, murder the men and ravish the women, 
and the fools believed it and left the city. 

After landing we were marched to the residence of the 
widow of Ex-President James K. Polk. He is buried in his 
own dooryard, in the northeast corner- Mrs. Polk came out 
on the veranda and greeted us kindly, the boys responding 
with cheers. Resuming the march we went about four miles 
from the city and went into camp on the Hardin Pike. Noth- 
ing of importance transpired from this time up to March 20th. 
when we received orders to move. 



CHAPTER V 

1862 



ON March 22nd, Captain J. F. Taylor and Lieutenant 
Sappington, Company D, resigned and went home. 
The regiment fell in line and we marched to the city. 
We soon came to the residence of "Parson" Brownlow, halt- 
ing here, he and his brave daughter came out and warmly 
greeted us. Both of them made a few remarks. The Parson 
said: "Boys, go on. I am with you. Give grape to the masses 
and hemp to the leaders," which was answered by three cheers 
for the parson and a "tiger" for the young lady. 

On the 21st we passed through Franklin, Tenn., went 
into camp at dark, having marched twenty miles. On the 23rd 
we marched to Spring Hill and went into camp, when it snowed 
for more than an hour, the weather was cold and very dis- 
agreeable. It continued snowing on the next day, clearing up 
on the 25th. We remained at Spring Hill until the 29th, when 
we started for Columbia and Duck River. The Fifteenth and 
Fortieth Indiana Regiments were here, and man}' of the boys 
visited their camp. 

On April 2nd we started for Shiloh, marching four miles 
on the 3rd, twelve miles on the 4th, fourteen miles the 5th, 
sixteen miles the 6th, seventeen miles on the 7th. Heard heavy 
cannonading all day. We went into camp, but at midnight were 
aroused and ordered to leave knapsacks with the teams and go 
in light marching order. It was a forced march, dark as pitch 
and raining in torrents. Many of the men stumbled and fell. 



"plowing the mud with their noses." We continued on until 
daylight brought relief in so far as we could see where we were 
going. The regiment presented a sorry spectacle, mud from 
head to foot, soaked to the skin from the constant rain, and 
many had sustained injuries to a certain extent. We arrived 
at Savanah on the Tennessee River about five o'clock toward 
the steamboat landing. General Thomas stood in the portico 
of a brick house (the headquarters of General Curtis), cheer- 
ing the boys as they passed. It was his old division, he was 
proud of them and the boys were proud of him, cheering him 
as they passed to the landing. We embarked on the steamer 
"War Eagle," and were seven miles from the battlefield of 
Shiloh. We arrived at Pittsburg Landing at dark on April 7th. 
too late to take any part in that bloody engagement. We were 
ordered to sleep on the boat, then ordered off and finally back 
on the boat where we remained until daylight. Two of us re- 
mained on the bluff, and seeing a large tarpaulin lying there 
we crawled under it to sleep till morning. We had got nicely 
fixed only somewhat crowded. We told the fellow to "lay 
over," but he didn't move, being very tired we soon went to 
sleep. In the morning we got up and to our surprise we had 
slept under the tarpaulin with twelve dead men who had been 
killed, laid on the bank and covered with the tarpaulin to keep 
the rain off of them. They were very quiet, however, and 
didn't disturb us while we were asleep. At daylight the 



i66 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



regiment was ordered off the boat and went into camp on the 
bluffs. All of the wagons and artillery of our division were 
miles back stalled in the mud. We had no tents or cooking 
utensils for ten days after our arrival. All rations had to be 
carried up the bluffs on our hacks from the steamers until a 
regular supply depot had been established. 

On the 17th our wagons came up. bringing our knapsacks 
and a change of clothing which was badly needed by the of- 
ficers and men. 

The scenes on this battlefield were horrifying in the ex- 
treme, and everything indicated it was one of the hardest 
fought battles of the war. 

On Sunday, April 12th, our Brigade, under General Speed 
S. Fry was detached with a squadron of the Fourth Illinois 
Cavalry under .Major Samuel L. Bowman, and ordered to 
proceed up the Tennessee River and destroy the railroad bridge 
over Bear River between Corinth and Iuka, and some ten miles 
from the Tennessee. In the evening of the 12th, the brigade 
embarked on the transports "White Cloud" and "Tecumseh" 
and accompanied by the gunboats "Tyler" and "Lexington"' 
under Commanders Gwin and Shisk, proceeded to Chicksaw 
Landing, the whole expedition being under command of Gen- 
eral W. T. Sherman. Early on the morning of the 13th we 
disembarked, the cavalry first. The cavalry had all disem- 
barked and one of the troopers rode to the top of the bluff 
which hid gunboats and transports, when General Sherman 
coming out of the lower deck and seeing the man at his place, 
exclaimed: "Come back here, damn it, I wouldn't have you seen 



up there for ten thousand dollars." Bowman with his cavalry 
pressed the enemy back from the start and in good time got 
to the railroad bridge and at once began its destruction. Our 
brigade soon got up and the work was rapidly completed. We 
destroyed 500 feet of trestle work besides the bridge proper, 
which was 240 feet in length. The command got back to 
Chicksaw Landing about 9 o'clock p. m. without the loss of a 
man. although Major Bowman inflicted some loss upon the 
enemy. This is one of the expeditions in which we were engeged 
of which the boys never speak and yet we were never engaged 
in a more important enterprise. 

On April 29th the general advance on Corinth, Miss., be- 
gan in four grand divisions, severally entitled as follows: The 
Right Wing under Major General George H. Thomas; the 
Center under Major General Buell ; the Left Wing under 
Major General John Pope, the Reserves under Major General 
John A. McClernard, the whole under command of Major 
General H. W. Halleck, with Major General U. S. Grant 
second in command. Our Division which belonged to the 
Army of the Ohio which occupied the Center under Buell. was 
transferred to the Right Wing un:!er command of General W. 
T. Sherman. 

April 22nd we were paid two months pay ($26.00) which 
helped some, and on the 23rd moved a short distance inland. 
The march on Corinth, Miss., had begun. Halleck was to be- 
seige Beauregard and capture or destroy him. Watch how he 
did it. Most of our time in April was employed by building 
corduroy roads over the swamps and bayous. The dense 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



167 



growth of vines and underbrush with the rains and stagnant 
pools of water was productive of miasmatic troubles. Fevers 
of all kinds as well as other diseases caused much sickness and 
many deaths. 

The corduroys were finally finished, but woe to the man 
or beast that was unfortunate enough to step or fall off of the 
roads; that was the last of them, they sunk out of sight in a 
very short time in the quicksands. Some of the mules that 
fell off of the corduroys were never found. 

General Halleck was busy transporting seige guns toward 
Corinth ; they were the heaviest ordnance we had at that time, 
taking ten or fifteen yoke of oxen or twenty horses to pull 
them. They were useless, in fact were never used that we 
ever heard of and would have been of no earthly account if 
they had been in position. 

May 20th we changed position moving forward to the 
right. Lieutenants Johnson of Company E and Shumate of 
Company I were ahead of the regiment, and both were wound- 
ed by Rebel skirmishers who kept up a continual fusilade. On 
the 22nd we received orders to build breastworks, which was 
done in a short time. From this time up to the 29th the weath- 
er was hot, raining" frequently and fighting continually. On 
this day one of the seige guns was let loose, which fairly shook 
the earth, farther than that no damage was done. 

We took axes and spades, advanced two miles and threw 
up another line of works. As this was nearest the Rebel lines 
logs and brush was omitted as the sound of chopping would 
draw the Rebel fire. 



May 30th we were ordered to advance. We had gone but 
a short distance when we heard cheering on our left and front. 
Our men had 'entered the Rebel fortifications. The enemy 
had "vamosed," "skedaddled," "skipped." "The bird had 
flown." Beauregard with 20,000 men had got away from 
Halleck's fine army of 100,000 men, the flower of the nation. 
Men who had fought at Mill Springs, Forts Henry and Donel- 
son and Shiloh. The great farce had ended and Halleck was 
in disrepute, hated and despised by the whole army. From 
April 10 to May 30 — forty days — we had crawled through 
swamps and brush — twenty miles — to beseige an enemy only 
one-fifth of our number. With the commanders he had he 
could easily have stormed the works and nearly captured Beau- 
regard's whole force. Grant was second in command, Thomas 
commanded the right wing; Buell the center and Pope the left. 
For days Pope told Halleck the enemy was evacuating. From 
his position and with the aid of field glasses he could see them 
loading their trains. Halleck laughed at Pope for his pains 
and sent back word : 

"General Pope up a tree 
The Rebels for to see." 

Where we charged the works we saw what we supposed 
to be cannon, proved to be logs about ten inches in diameter 
— the bark having been peeled off and then painted black. The 
"Quaker guns" pointing toward us had frightened Halleck. 
Many a life would have been saved had Halleck pushed for- 
ward and forced the fighting. The men would much rather go 
into action than lie in hospitals with fevers, which even if they 



i68 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



recovered therefrom would have unfitted them for any kind of 
service during or after the war. 

For days Pope asked permission to swing the left wing 
to the south of Corinth and take possession of the Mobile & 
Ohio and Memphis & Charleston railroads. While Thomas 
could have advanced on the right and Buell charged the cen- 
ter, would not only have given our army possession of Corinth, 
but of the Rebel army as well, with all their arms, munitions, 
camp and garrison equipage. Halleck was obdurate, ridiculed 
Pope, and Beauregard "flew the coop," and got safely out of 
reach. Curses loud and deep were uttered against Halleck, 
who was denounced as an imbecile, and his conduct bordering 
on cowardice. He should never have been given the com- 
mand. Had Grant or Thomas been in command the result 
would have been entirely different. 

This meant a foot race. Pope started in hot pursuit, 
overtaking them and capturing many prisoners. Our division 
had orders to join in the race, which we did, going as far as 
Booneville and Rienzie, Miss., returning to our old camp on 
the gth of June. Here we remained until the 22nd when we 
were paid off. General Thomas had been relieved of his com- 
mand of the right wing of the army and returned to his old 
division, the First, Army of the Ohio. The Army of the Ohio, 
under Buell, started on the march eastward and ordered to 
repair the railroad as he went. We resumed the march east- 
ward, making twelve miles on the 23rd, eight miles on the 
24th and went into Iuka, Miss., where we were assigned as 
Provost Guards for two days, being relieved by the Eighteenth 



Regulars. We then resumed the march, reaching Tuscumbia, 
Ala., June 29. Tuscumbia was a place of about 1,500 inhab- 
itants, beautifully situated, being surrounded by hills and 
rolling ground. The scenery was grand. The inhabitants were 
supplied with water from an underground river which came 
out near the southern part of the town. Darkies hauled the 
water by having a hogshead set on two wheels, or rather a 
cart. They would drive in the stream and fill the casks and 
take it to the citizens. The water was very clear and cold. 
Where we went into camp there was a large hole which led 
us down to this river under ground and which supplied the 
regiment with water. Some of the adventurous members, 
thought to explore the stream, after going about a quarter of 
a mile they returned, the water being too cold for them. 
Where this stream started from no one knew, neither could 
the oldest inhabitant give any definite information. It was 
evidently fed by springs in the mountains- We celebrated the 
Fourth of July at this place with a grand parade and speech- 
making. We remained here until July 19, when we received 
orders to march. Bragg had invaded east Tennessee and was 
evidently headed for Kentucky. Buell's army was sent to 
head him off. 

We crossed the Tennessee River at, Florence, Ala., thence 
to Pulaski, thence to Decherd. In the regimental hospital was 
some eighty-five sick. These were sent by rail to Stevenson 
and to Nashville, the convalescents joining the regiment at 
Decherd. From Decherd we went to Pelham. in the Se- 
quatchie Valley, living on roasting ears and peaches. At this 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



169 



point or Sparta we were looking for a fight, which should 
have come off as will be seen later on. Bragg only had 35.000 
men and Buell could have undoubtedly whipped him had he 
been so disposed. But no, he let Bragg go by and on to Ken- 
tucky. The march was resumed, and it narrowed itself down 
to a foot race between Buell and Bragg who would reach 
Louisville first. We reached Murfreesboro September 5th 
and Nashville September 7th. 

While at Nashville we drew rations, ammunition and 
clothing. Some fool issued orders for the Quartermaster to 
draw swords and sashes for the Sergeants of the regiment. 
These were issued to the various orderlies, who in turn issued 
them to the Sergeants. All manner of fun was made of them, 
all kinds of ridiculous remarks and ludicrous antics were per- 
formed by the boys until the}' became tired, when they returned 
them to the orderlies, who turned them over to Quarter- 
master Wilstach and told him to "go to with his frog 

stickers" as they had no use for any extra luggage. 

At this time we were traveling light. Gun, cartridge box, 
canteen, haversack, blanket and oil cloth constituted the equip- 
ment on this march. September 15th we resumed the march, 
going twenty miles that day on the Louisville Pike. On the 
16th twenty-three miles, 17th twenty-five miles, reaching 
Bowling Green, Ky., and camping about a mile and a half 
from town. Rained all night for a change, as the weather had 
been very hot and the pike very dusty. 

On the 18th marched three miles, camping in sight of 
Buckner's fortifications; 19th marched twenty-five miles, 20th 



ten miles and came in sight of Rebel pickets along Green 
River. We camped in an old field which gradually sloped 
down toward the river about three-fourths of a mile. It being 
Sunday we were idle during the day, but could plainly see the 
"Johnnies" washing and drying their clothes. General Thomas 
wanted to attack them but Buell forbid it, as he did during 
the entire march. September 22nd marched seventeen miles, 
23rd twenty-eight miles through Elizabethtown. September 
24th marched twenty-eight miles and camped on Salt River. 
September 25th marched twenty m'iles to Louisville. 

The road from the mouth of Salt River was along the 
Ohio River all the way to Louisville. Across the Ohio we 
could see "Old Indiana." This made the boys homesick. How 
they did want to cross the river into "God's Country." They 
would have been willing to have marched the whole distance 
to their homes for the sake of seeing relatives and friends and 
fill up on rations "mother used to cook." But there was no 
hopes. They were in for it for three years" unless sooner shot, 
and knew the only way to get home was to desert, which they 
would never do. 

On our arrival at Louisville we went into camp on the 
Louisville & Nashville Railroad. 

So great was the antipathy and distrust of Buell that the 
army insisted on a new commander, and President Lincoln 
tendered it to General George H. Thomas. Thomas was of 
the opinion that Buell should have another opportunity to re- 
deem himself and declined the offer. Fatal mistake for "Pap" 
Thomas and the ruination of Buell as will be seen later on. 



170 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Upon our arrival at Louisville we first saw the new reg- 
iments, who had enlisted under the 300,000 call of 1862. The 
"vets" were disposed to have some fun at their expense, and 
would go around camp yelling "fresh fish." The government 




How tile boys looked when they arrived at Louisville from Corinth, Sept., 1865. 
More sense than property. 

had wisely decided to brigade the new troops with the old vets. 
To our division was assigned the Eighty-Second Indiana to 
First Brigade, Seventy-Fourth Indiana to Second Brigade and 
the Eighty-Seventh Indiana to the Third Brigade, First Divi- 



sion, Department of the Ohio. All other new regiments were 
similarly distributed. 

Of course the "fresh fish" was a source of amusement to 
the vets. All kinds of lies and improbable stories were told 
the new men. They stared with wide open eyes to see the 
boys coming in with hardly anything in shape of equipments, 
while the new troops were loaded down with all kinds of 
trumpery. Knapsacks were a foot above their heads. Over- 
coats, two suits of clothes and underwear, all kinds of trin- 
kets, bear's oil for the hair, etc., gifts from loving and well 
meaning friends but useless to the soldier. On the back of 
their knapsacks were strapped frying pans, coffee pots and 
stew pans, pairs of boots hanging to the knapsack, blankets 
and ponchos, making in weight one hundred pounds to the 
man, while the "vet" carried about twenty-five pounds. 

The nights began to grow cool and as we had no blankets 
the boys went foraging among the "fresh fish" and in due 
course of time they were comfortably fixed and the new fel- 
lows relieved of considerable weight. They came over to the 
old regiments with their "tale of woe." They were told it 
"was a shame and an outrage" and the best thing they could 
do was to learn how and do the same. They "learned" how 
in course of time to the disgust of some of the "old" boys. 
About the second day after our arrival at Louisville some of 
the boys took "French leave" and went home, but returned in 
time to start for Perryville. 

September 29th the Division -was paid off excepting our 
regiment and the Tenth Kentucky. This caused a rumpus, 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



171 



and the boys fixed bayonets, reversed arms and stuck the bay- 
onets in the ground — butts up. They refused to budge an inch 
until they were paid. We were out of money and needed it, 
but the order to march came before the paymaster reached the 
two regiments. Colonel Kise tried to reason with them, Gen- 
eral Fry came over, but they were obstinate. By some hocus 
pocus which passes the comprehension of everyone, a "feller" 
by the name of Gilbert had been placed in command of our 
Corps (formerly commanded by General Thomas), had heard 
about the two regiments refusing to march until paid. He 
rode up and began a tirade of profanity and abuse, and finally 
ordered Batter)' C to unlimber and throw a few charges of 

cannister into the two regiments and "blow them to ." 

The battery refused to do it. Gilbert was boiling over, rip- 
ping, raring mad. Finally General Thomas came over and 
said, "Boys, I am sorry marching orders came before you 
were paid off, we are on a very important march and in all 
probability will get Bragg before he gets many miles away. 
Now if you will fall in I will promise you the next stop we 
make, long enough, I will have the paymaster there and you 
shall be paid before you move again." This had the desired 
effect, the boys cheered him and said, "All right, 'Pap,' we 
will go." In a few minutes they joined the brigade which was 
some distance ahead on the march. 

October 1, 1862, we broke camp and marched sixteen 
miles on the Shepherdsville Pike, camped in the woods and 
formed in line of battle. On the 2nd marched eight miles to 
Shepherdsville and formed in line of battle. On the 4th broke 



camp and marched eleven miles, our division in the advance, 
formed line of battle within a mile of the enemy. October 
5th marched eighteen miles through Bardstown and camped 
on Beach Fork. October 6th marched twenty miles and 
formed in line of battle, and supported a battery. The ad- 
vance brigade had a hard skirmish with the enemy. Marched 
all night. About midnight the regiment halted for rest. It 
was always customary for the men to divide the column and 
lie down on both sides of the road. Many of the men were 
soon asleep, very tired from the long continuous marching. 
We had not rested long until someone came by and from the 
number of horses and the cloud of dust they raised we sup- 
posed it was a regiment of cavalry. Finally the head of the 
column halted in front of our colors. A man sang out to 
Captain Boswell, "What regiment is this?" The captain re- 
plied that "it was the Tenth Indiana." "D d pretty regi- 
ment. Why in don't you get up and salute me when I 



pass 1 



Boswell said, 



are you?" "Major 



General Gilbert, by 



'Who in the - 

— , sir. Give me your sword, sir, you 
are under arrest." By this time Colonel Kise came down to 
see what the trouble was. Gilbert said to him, "Are you the 

colonel of this regiment ?" Kise replied that he was. "D d 

nice colonel. Why are you not in line and salute me as I 
pass?" Colonel Kise told him, "after marching his regiment 
all day and all night steady for a week he would not hold 

dress parade at midnight for any d d fool living, and the 

best he could do was to move on." Gilbert rode up to Louden, 
color bearer, and demanded the colors, that he would disgrace 



172 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



such an armed mob. Dave gave him 1 a cursing and told him 
if he polluted the colors by touching them he would kill him. 
Finally the boys began to get mad and thought they had 
enough of his insults. Jim Luddington, Company H, said, 

"Now here, you d d son , get out of here or you are 

a dead man, go — git." At this point someone fired a musket, 
and at the same time Lud jabbed Gilbert's horse with a bay- 
onet. The horse reared and plunged and nearly threw Gilbert 
off — and they went on a gallop. He had a large staff and a 
whole squadron of cavalry for a body guard. The galloping 
horses raised such a dust that we were nearly blinded and 
suffocated, but many a poor horse got a bayonet. There was 
ever afterward an enmity against Gilbert in the regiment and 



some threatened to shoot him if we got into action. No 
danger of that, however, as Gilbert was too big a coward to 
get near enough for any of our men or the enemy to get a 
crack at him. 

Gilbert was one of these understrappers ranking as a cap- 
tain in the regular army and had been by some "hocus pocus" 
sent to command our corps. Notoriously unfit to command 
even a corporal's guard, but more about him later on. 

After this episode we resumed the march. At daylight we 
stopped for breakfast, marched all day the 7th and at night 
when we expected to get a night's rest were ordered to go on 
picket. 



BATTLE OF PERRYVILLE 



On the morning of October 8, at daybreak the regiment 
was ordered to form line of battle and advance on the enemy. 
We occupied the extreme left of the center. We advanced 
through the woods about a mile, when near the crest of the 

hill, the Fifth Arkansas, 
which was concealed behind a 
worm fence and brush gave 
the regiment a volley killing 
four of Company B and 
wounding many more. After 
firing the volley the Rebels 
broke and ran across the field 
to join their forces. The reg- 
iment then charged and cap- 
tured the hill where they re- 
mained in line of battle until 
about 10 o'clock when Sheri- 
dan's Division filed in front of 
our regiment to the position 

BRIG. GEN. SPEED S. FRY ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ 

third battle in which the Tenth fired the first shot — Rich 
Mountain Mill Springs, Perryville. 

Colonel Rise objected to this move on the part of Sheridan, 
as he had received orders to hold the hill until further orders. 
Rise and Sheridan were having a spirited confab when General 




Fry, commanding the division, came up and ordered us back 
about ioo yards. The fight in front of Sheridan began about 
1 1 o'clock, Bragg evidently making a feint, previous to hurling 
his whole force against the left wing, commanded by General 
McCook. 

About this time the regiment was ordered to the north 
side of the hill occupied by the Signal Corps and there to await 
orders which we did until dark and then ordered to camp. 
From our position we had a splendid view of the battlefield and 
watched, all the afternoon, McCook, with 20,000 men fight 
60,000 Rebels. Division after division was hurled against Mc- 
Cook only to be repulsed. Our corps joined McCook on the 
right, hut was not engaged. Where was "Major General Gil- 
bert" all this time? Why was he not with his corps and en- 
gaged in the fight and re-enfore McCook, who was hard pressed 
all that afternoon ? But no Gilbert was there. He was back 
in the rear guarding a spring for himself and staff so famishing 
men could not get a drink of water. McCook sent one appeal 
after another to Buell, who was two miles and a half in the 
rear, and declared they were "wasting powder unnecessarily." 
In fact he knew nothing of the battle being fought in his front 
and sent one of his aides to "stop that useless wasting of pow- 
der." About 2:30 p. m. he found out the battle was a reality, 
but took no means to fully inform himself as to the position 
of any of his troops. The Tenth Indiana was about the only 
regiment in our division engaged in the battle. The center 



174 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



and right wing under Crittenden, was not engaged at all. We 
saw nothing of "Major General Gilbert" from the night he 
aroused the regiment until next morning after the fight. He 
was a coward. When we arrived at Perryville Buell's army 
was estimated by officers as consisting of from 80.000 to 100,- 
000 men. Bragg had about 60,000. Of Buell's army 60,000 
men never fired a gun. Yet he let Bragg escape. 

Why was General Thomas placed second in command with 
nothing to say nor any power to do anything without orders 
from Buell? Why was his corps (Third) taken from him and 
the humbug Gilbert placed in command? Gilbert wore Major 
General's shoulder straps. Yet every colonel and brigadier in 
the army out-ranked him. He had no more right to order 
Sheridan, Fry or any other general than had any sergeant or 
corporal. The fact leaked out that President Lincoln had sent 
his name to the senate as a brigadier, but the senate failed to 
confirm him. Hence he was a non-entity in more ways than 
one. It will be remembered that when we arrived at Louis- 
ville from Corinth trie President and Secretary of War wanted 
General Thomas to take command of the army and let Buell 
out. Thomas was honest ; he did not wish to seem as though 
he was ambitious and deprive Buell of the honor of his com- 
mand, so telegraphed Washington to give Buell another chance. 
So no change was made. What a great mistake on the part 
of General Thomas. What base ingratitude was Buell guilty 
of when he repaid Thomas by relieving him of the command 
of his old corps and substituting Gilbert. 

The Battle of Perryville had been fought. Buell's golden 
opportunity to redeem himself had been ignored and he had 



ended his military career for all time to come, he had gone 
into a total eclipse and we heard no more of him. 

On the morning of the 9th Bragg had "skedaddled," taking 
all his plunder with him. Our division followed him to Crabb 
Orchard. Pie had made good his escape. A private solider 
is presumed to be in ignorance of everything pertaining to a 
campaign or battle, excepting his immediate duty of standing 
picket, firing his musket in time of action, and obeying orders. 
Yet the United States Army was composed of intelligent men, 
men of education, men of judgment and discretion and knew 
when an officer failed, or was incompetent, as well as the of- 
lcer himself, and they were not slow in condemning or com- 
mending him as the circumstances of the case would warrant. 
In verification of what I have written concerning the Battle 
of Perryville, I submit for the consideration of the reader the 
following official reports, and sworn testimony of officers be- 
for the Buell Court of Inquiry : 

The first is from Major General H. W. Halleck at that 
time General-in-Chief of the Army at Washington. This re- 
port shows the position of the armies while at Corinth, Miss. : 

"Headquarters of the Army, 
Sir: Washington, Nov. 25, 1862. 



"When I left the Department of the Mississippi, in July 
last, the main body of the army under Major General Buell, 
was between Huntsville and Stevenson, Ala., moving toward 
Chattanooga for which place they had left Corinth about June 
10th. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



175 



"These several armies spread along a line of some 600 
miles from the western borders of Arkansas to Cumberland 
Gap, and occupying a strip of country more than 150 miles in 
width, from which the enemy's forces had recently been ex- 
pelled, were rapidly decreasing in strength from the larger 
number of soldiers sent home on account of real or pretended 
disabilities. On the other hand, the enemy's were greatly in- 
creased by an arbitrary and rigidly enforced conscription. With 
their superiority in numbers and discipline they boldly deter- 
mined to re-occupy Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee and Ken- 
tucky, and if possible to invade the states of Ohio, Indiana and 
Illinois, while our attention was distracted by the invasion 
of Maryland and Pennsylvania and an extended Indian insur- 
rection on the western frontiers. 

"This plan had very many chances of success, but the 
timely order of the President of August 4th. calling for addi- 
tional forces and the patriotic response of the people of the 
northwest thwarted the enemy's well formed calculations. 

"General Bragg suddenly transferred a large part of his 
army from Tupelo, Miss., through the states of Alabama and 
Georgia, reached Chattanooga in advance of General Buell, 
turned his left rapidly crossing the state of Tennessee, entered 
Kentucky by Munfordsville and Lebanon. 

"General Buell fell back on Nashville without giving the 
enemy battle, then followed or rather moved parallel with 
Bragg, who after capturing our garrison at Munfordville, 
turned off the main road to Louisville along which General 



Buell passed the latter reaching Louisville without any en- 
gagement. 

"Major General Buell left Louisville on the 1st of October 
with an army of about 100,000 men in pursuit of Bragg. The 
latter engaged a part of Buell' s army at Perry ville about 10 
o'clock on the 8th of October. A general battle ensued and 
was continued till dark. 

"It was mainly fought by McCook's Corps. The enemy 
retreated during the night after this battle, the main army of 
Rebels retreated to East Tennessee. General Buell pursued it 
as far as Mt. Vernon or London and then fell back to Louis- 
ville and Nashville. Here Major General Rosecrans supersed- 
ed him in command by order of the President. 

Very Respectfully, 

Your Obedient Servant. 

H. W. Halleck, 
Hon. E. M. Stanton, General-in-Chief. 

Secretary of War. 

Report of Colonel William C. Kisi*. 

Tenth Indiana Infantry, 

Second Brigade, First Division. 

Camp near Crab Orchard, Ky., 

Oct. 10, 1862. 

"I have the honor to report to you, that on the evening of 

the 7th instant, according to your order I sent my regiment 



176 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



on picket duty under command of Lieut. Colonel Carroll, and 
had it posted one and one-half miles in advance of our camp, 
on the road leading to Perryville in front of where the enemy 
was said to be in force. About 12 o'clock midnight, Lieut. 
Colonel Carroll sent out Companies A and E, Captain Hamilton 
and Johnson as skirmishers to feel after and ascertain if pos- 
sible if the enemy was in the vicinity. Captain Johnson pro- 
ceeded about a mile, when he came upon a considerable force 
of the enemy and engaged them. After exchanging a number 
of shots and finding a superior numberof the enemy opposed 
to him he fell back according to orders, on the regiment, Cap- 
tain Hamilton taking position as outpost picket. 

Nothing further occurred until 5 A. M. when the regiment 
was formed in line of battle and moved across an open field 
about a half-mile, when the skirmishers under Captain John- 
son were again fired upon by those of the enemy. I arrived on 
the field at 7 A. M. and took command. Soon after I relieved 
Captain Johnson's company of skirmishers by sending forward 
Company B, Captain Goben, to take their place, which position 
Captain Goben maintained, skirmishing with the enemy occas- 
ionally until about 12 o'clock noon, when by your order, moved 
the regiment out of the woods, across an open field under 
fire of shot and shell from a battery of the enemy. Crossing 
a rail and stone fence, and ascending a steep hill, followed to 
our left, and somewhat in our rear by the Eighty-sixth Illinois 
under command of Colonel Irons. 

We came upon a force of the enemy outnumbering us, 
who at once opened a galling fire upon us which was returned 
by my regiment in splendid order. 



Company B, Captain Goben being the left flanking com- 
pany and near where the enemy was in heavy force under 
cover of a rail fence and under the slope of a hill sustained 
the brunt of the battle, suffering a loss of four killed and three 
wounded ; but the captain leading his men stood up resolutely, 
and after my regiment had obstinately contested the ground for 
twenty minutes, the enemy gave way and fled in confusion, 
leaving their dead and wounded on the field. 

After remaining on the field of our success until 3 P. M. 
when a general line of battle was formed by General Sheridan's 
division, the Tenth Indiana being the only regiment on the field 
from your brigade or from the First Division, I was ordered 
by General Sheridan to the rear as a support, which order I 
promptly but reluctantly obeyed. Shortly after I received an 
order from you to rejoin the brigade which I did about sunset. 
My regiment lost four killed and seven wounded. The list is 
herewith appended. 

In closing this brief report, I Would be doing injustice to 
the officers and men of my command were I not to speak of 
the promptness with which my every order was obeyed and 
executed and the gallantry of officers and men of the regiment. 
Every line officer on the field was at his post. Lieutenant 
Colonel William B. Carroll, Major Marsh B. Taylor and Ad- 
jutant John W. Hardin rendered me invaluable assistance by 
their energy, coolness and courage on the field. 

The movements of the regiment having been made under 
your immediate observation, this report is respectfully submit- 
ted, hoping the day is not far distant when the Tenth Indiana 
will again have an opportunity of going to battle under your 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



177 



generalship, to assist in crushing out a rebellion raised by am- 
bitious men and disappointed office seekers. 

I am very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 
W- C. Kise, 
Colonel Commanding Tenth Indiana. 

Brig. General S. S. Fry, 

Commanding Second Brigade, First Division, 
Department of the Ohio. 

Buell's failures from Corinth to Perryville subjected him 
to a court of inquiry which nearly amounted to a court mar- 
tial, and in order that members of the regiment may clearly 
understand why we were nearly marched to death and no fight- 
ing, I herewith copy the order convening the court, their con- 
clusions and the testimony of officers of our division in rela- 
tion thereto. 

Headquarters of the Army, 
Special Orders Washington, Nov. 20, 1862. 

No. 356. 

I. A Military Commission will convene at Cincinnati. 
Ohio, on the 27th instant, to investigate and report upon the 
operation of the Army under the command of Major General 
D. C. Buell U. S. Volunteers in Kentucky and Tennessee. 

Detail for The Commission. 
Major General Lewis Wallace, U. S. Volunteers. 
Major General Edward O. C. Ord. U. S. Volunteers. 
Brigadier General Albin Schoepf, U. S. Volunteers. 



Brigadier General N. J. T. Dana, U. S. Volunteers. 
Brigadier General Daniel Tyler, U. S. Volunteers. 
Major Donn Piatt, A. D. C, Judge Advocate and 
Recorder. 

By Command of Major General Halleck, 

E. D. Townsend, Ass't Adjutant General. 

Opinion of the Commission. 

The order convening the Commission requires it to in- 
vestigate and report upon the operation of the army under the 
command of Major General D. C. Buell in Kentucky and 
Tennessee. 

First. The operations of Major General Buell in Ken- 
tucky and Tennessee. 

Second. Suffering Kentucky to be invaded by Rebels un- 
der General Bragg. 

Third. Failure to relieve Munfordville. 

Fourth. The Battle of Perryville and conduct there. 

Fifth. Permitting the Rebels to escape from Kentucky. 

II. "We find that the rebels under Bragg concentrated at 
Chattanooga about the 22nd of July, 1862, for the purpose of 
invading Kentucky. Prior to that, on the nth day of June 
General Buell with his Army of the Ohio, was ordered by 
General Halleck to march against Chattanooga and take it, with 
the ulterior object of dislodging Kirby Smith and his Rebel 
force in East Tennessee. 

"We are of the opinion that General Buell had force suf- 
ficient to accomplish the object if he could have promptly 



i 7 8 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



moved to Chattanooga. The plan of operations, however, pre- 
scribed by General Halleck compelled Buell to repair the 
Memphis & Charleston Railroad from Corinth to Decatur and 
put it in running order as a line of supplies during the advance. 
While that road proved of comparatively little service, the 
work forced such delays that a prompt march on Chattanooga 
was impossible. The delays thus occasioned gave Bragg time 
to send a numerous cavalry force to operate against General 
Buell's lines of supply which were unnecessarily long. 

"The massing of the Rebel force at Chattanooga compelled 
a relinquishment of the design against that place ; after which 
General Buell was required to exert all of his energies to pre- 
vent the re-capture of Nashville and the invasion of Kentucky. 
This he could have done in our opinion by an early concen- 
tration of his army at Sparta, McMinnville or Murfreesboro, 
with a view to active operations against Bragg, the moment he 
debouched from Sequatchie Valley. Instead of that he 
waited until September 5th, before concentrating at Murfrees- 
boro ; from which he retired to Nashville thereby allowing 
Bragg to cross the Cumberland River without interruption. 

"The Commission cannot justify the falling back from 
Murfreesboro to Nashville, but is of the opinion that it was 
General Buell's duty from that point to have attacked the 
Rebel army before it crossed the Cumberland and it is the 
belief, that had that course been pursued Bragg would have 
been defeated. 

III. Failure to relieve Munfordville. 



"In the relative movements of the Armies of Buell and 
Bragg, Munfordsville was important on account of its railroad 
bridge over Green River, and its natural strength as a position 
for battle. Bragg moved upon it by way of Glasgow and not 
anticipating any great resistance he dispatched a column in ad- 
vance of his main body to take it. The column was repulsed 
by the garrison. On the 14th of September Bragg then moved 
his whole army against the post. On the 17th of September it 
was justifiably surrendered. The order to hold Munfordsville 
proceeded from General Wright, commanding the Department 
of the Ohio, of which Kentucky formed a part. It was given 
in expectation that Buell would reach the place in time to save 
it. General Wright seemed to have had no certain informa- 
tion upon which to base his expectations ; at the time it was 
given he only knew that both Bragg and Buell were advancing 
toward it. Nor was there any undertaking on Buell's part to 
relieve the garrison or any preconcerted action whatever re- 
specting it. 

"We are of the opinion therefore that the orders given 
the commander of this post should have left him discretion to 
fight or retire according to circumstances, as it was, the order 
was to hold it to the last. 

"Had not Bragg moved so quickly on Munfordsville he 
would have been attacked at Glasgow by Buell, who was 
moving to attack when the surrender took place. Defeat of 
the Rebels at Glasgow would of course have saved Munfords- 
ville. While Buell was on the march to Munfordsville he 
heard of its surrender. Relief was then too late. It is our 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



179 



opinion therefore, that Buell is not responsible for the capture 
of the town, except so far as his failure to attack Bragg south 
of the Cumberland River made him responsible for the conse- 
quences of that failure. 

IV. Battle of Perryville and conduct there. 

"General Buell left Louisville October 1st, with a force 
superior in our judgment, not only to Bragg's army but to the 
armies of Bragg and Kirby Smith united. 

His routes were well chosen, and the advance of his col- 
umns admirably regulated. His immediate object was to at- 
tack the Rebels and destroy them ; failing in that he was to 
drive them out of Kentucky. 

"Engagement was expected at Bardstown, at which place 
it would seem from his orders and instructions to corps com- 
manders General Buell next intended to attack him on the 9th 
of October. Positions for the formation of the line of battle 
were defined in those orders. Accordingly on the morning of 
the 8th, Gilbert with his corps was in position in the center ; 
McCook with his corps (less Sill's division) arrived on the 
left about 9 o'clock and Thomas in command of the right wing 
(Crittenden's Corps), reached his position and reported his ar- 
rival to Buell about noon. 

"About 2 o'clock in the afternoon the enemy poured a 
heavy column of attack upon McCook, effecting in our opinion, 
a partial surprise. The contest however, was obstinate and 
bloody and ended by nightfall, at which time McCook's right 
had been turned and driven back with serious loss. The dura- 
tion of the battle was about four hours. 



"There can be no question about its being the duty 01 
somebody to assist McCook, as his right bad been posted not 
exceeding 300 yards from Gilbert's left, and as the severest 
fighting was on McCook's right we cannot see why Gilbert did 
not reinforce him when so requested. He should have done 
it. if for no other reason than that McCook's discomfiture ex- 
posed his own flank. Nothing but positive orders fixing and 
holding kirn in his position can justify his failure. If such 
there were, they have not been heard of in the testimony. 
Moreover it is clear that all of Buell's orders were in prepara- 
tion for attacking him the next morning, not in anticipation of 
being attacked that day. In this latter event therefore, the 
exercise of discretion could not have been improper if the 
action taken had been promptly reported to headquarters, par- 
ticularly as Buell was not on the field for instant consultation. 
As it was, assistance dlid not reach McCook until dark. 

"General Buell established his headquarters about two and 
one-half miles from the front on the Springfield road. He was 
not on the field or along the line during the day, and bad no 
intelligence of the attack on McCook until 4 o'clock in the 
evening. 

About 2 o'clock a heavy cannonading was heard at his 
headquarters, and coming out of his tent, he said : 'There was 
a great waste of powder over there,' and directed Gilbert, who 
was with him at the time to send an order to the front 'to stop 
that useless waste of powder.' 

"It is clear to us that Buell did not believe a battle was 
in progress, and that he supposed the firing was from some 



i8o 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



reconnaissance. On this point it is our opinion that 'he should 
either have been on the field in person ready for emergencies 
and advantages or have taken and required to have been taken 
every precaution for the instant transmission of intelligence 
to his headquarters ; as he had an organized Signal Corps with 
his army, this failure was all the more culpable. And in this 
connection we are of the opinion that General McCook's fail- 
ure to send up instant notice of the attack upon him in force 
was equally culpable. We find that during the greater part 
of the attack on McCook, Gilbert's Corps was unengaged, 
while Thomas' wing had not so much as a demonstration 
against it. We have reason to believe also, that all of Bragg's 
army at Perryville at the time was flung upon McCook and 
that his lines of retreat by way of Harrodsburg and Danville 
was so exposed that after 4 o'clock they could have been to 
a great degree, if not entirely, cut off, if Crittenden's Corps 
had been vigorously pushed forward for the purpose. In our 
judgment the opportunity slipped through Buell's absence from 
the field or on account of his ignorance of the condition of 
the battle. We are very sure that if he could have ordered 
supports to McCook at an earlier hour than he did order 
them, the attack would have been repulsed with less loss to 
himself and greater to the enemy. 

V. Permitting Rebels to escape without loss from Ken- 
tucky. 

"It cannot be said that the Rebels escaped without loss 
from Kentucky. Besides their killed and wounded at Perry- 
ville they were compelled to destroy a large quantity of stores 
which had been collected at Camp 'Dick Robinson.' The 



morning after the battle, it was very early discovered that 
Bragg had retreated from his position near Perryville, and 
that his army had for the most part gone in the direction of 
Harrodsburg. Leaving all his sick and wounded and some 
material at Harrodsburg and being joined by Kirby Smith, 
he hastened across Dick's River to Camp Dick Robinson. 
There he destroyed and abandoned the stores mentioned and 
resumed his retreat. In these movements the march of his 
columns was hurried. That part of it from Perryville was 
confused and disordered. 

"Our opinion is that if Buell 'had taken up a vigorous pur- 
suit as soon in the morning of the 9th as the retreat was dis- 
covered the check received by the Rebels at Perryville would 
have been turned into a rout, with all its consequences. 

"But the manner in which they were followed to Harrods- 
burg can hardly be called a pursuit. Buell should have endeav- 
ored by energetic movement of his whole army to crush them 
somewhere between Perryville and Dick River. From Camp 
Dick Robinson, Bragg had but two roads left him by which he 
could hope to escape from Kentucky. Dividing his forces at 
Crab Orchard, one portion of them could go out by way of 
Cumberland Gap, the other by way of Somerset. Had Buell 
intercepted on these lines, as we think he could have done 
from either Perryville or Danville, Bragg would have been 
compelled to give battle with the same results, we doubt not as 
if he had been defeated before crossing Dick River. 

"The evidence estabishes that Buell received information 
On the night of the nth, that Bragg had crossed the river at 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



1S1 



Camp Dick Robinson ; yet he made no determined movement 
with the main body of the army until 12 o'clock in the night 
of the 13th. From the morning of the 9th to the night of the 
1 ith he waited to learn whether his enemy would cross the 
river; that being definitely known, he lost two days before 
taking any decisive action. Finally on the night of the 13th 
he started Crittenden's Corps through Danville toward Crab 
Orchard. It was too late; Bragg with his column and all 
his train had passed the point of interception, to this delay 
we are compelled to attribute the escape of the rebels from 
Kentucky. . 

Lewis Wallace, 
Maj. Gen'l and President of the Commission. 
Donn Piatt, 

Colonel U. S. Volunteers and Tndge Advocate." 



The foregoing corroborates the statements made by of- 
• ficers and men in the army, that Buell could have attacked 
Bragg at Sparta, Tenn., or McMinnville, defeated him and 
captured a large portion of his army and equipment thus sav- 
ing the army the long march to Louisville. Then on that 
march there were several opportunities which presented them- 
selves, where he could have attacked Bragg and forced him 
to fight, thus saving Mumfordsville and eventually prevented 
the long march and the Battle of Perryville. Again if he had 
followed Bragg on the morning of the 9th on a quick march 
he would not have escaped from Kentucky without being bad- 
ly crippled and probably the Battle of Stone River would 
never have been fought. 



CHAPTER VI 

Sparta 



THE Commission continued its investigations, and as it 
relates to the service of the regiment, and their report 
is authentic, I deem it but proper to introduce some 
of the testimony of officers relative to Buell and Gilbert. 

"Bragg seems from the evidence to have anticipated that 
his crossing the Tennessee River would be disputed. Upon 
what his anticipation was based is difficult to determine. Long- 
after his design, if not his plan of invasion had been developed, 
the Army of the Ohio was stationed along an extending line, 
devoted to guarding and repairing railways, in a manner that 
made it impossible to concentrate for the purpose of opposing 
his crossing. 

"When, however, their crossing was effected, the ablest 
military minds in the army other than its commanders sug- 
gested a concentration where the Rebels could be met as they 
passed the Sequatchie Valley to the plains of middle Tennessee. 

"Sparta or McMinnville is suggested, but especially Spar- 
ta, where they could have fought with every prospect of suc- 
cess. That Bragg must pass by Sparta was reasonable to sup- 
pose, at the time and with the light before the Commission a 
necessity. 

"Had he retained Chattanooga as his base, he could not 
have passed to the right or left of our army in position without 
his line of communications cut and his army turned upon a 



line of country where Buell had been at some pains to prove 
an army could not subsist. 

If, on the other hand he burdened himself with little 
transportation and only carried subsistence for eight or ten 
days, thereby cutting loose from his base, which proved to be 
the fact, his road lay through the Sequatchie Valley out by 
Sparta, and on the almost direct line to Bardstown, along 
which route his supplies had been provided. 

"The position at Sparta is, we are assured, naturally a 
strong one, and offers such advantages that 15,000 men might 
have been intrusted to its defense, against 30,000 of the enemy ; 
but while all seems doubtful on the part of our army with 
hesitation in its movements and uncertainty in its future, Bragg 
acts as if his way were assured to him and success the certain 
results of his efforts. History of military campaigns afford no 
parallel to this of an army throwing aside its transportation, 
paying no regard to its supplies, but cutting loose from its 
base, marching 200 miles in the face of and really victorious 
over an army double its size." 

The members of the Tenth will readily remember the 
above while we lay at Pelham and subsequently moved to 
McMinnville. How Buell was cursed by the rank and file for 
allowing Bragg to get away without a fight and in the face 
of six divisions of as good an army as ever trod the earth, ft 



1 84 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



was here that the officers of our division (ist) drew up a 
Memorial to President Lincoln to 'have Buell removed. The 
evidence given before the commission is interesting reading 
and I herewith copy some of it. 

December 13, 1862, General James B. Steedman was on 
the stand. 

Question. "How far back on the Springfield Pike were 
you at the commencement of that fight?" (Perryville). 

Answer. "Perhaps three miles. I have a more distinct 
recollection of the camp than I have of the distance. It was 
a hard place to get water. The only water there, General 
Gilbert kept for 'his own use, his staff and escort, while the 
soldiers were perishing for it. He had a guard over it and 
zvould not let them have a drink." 

Question. "State to the commission, if you please, what 
expression of opinion you heard from Major General McCook 
upon the movements of General Buell's army and General 
Buell's capacity as a commander?" 

Answer. "While the troops were at Pelham, I had a con- 
versation with General McCook in relation to the movements 
then going on. I remember his words. He was sitting beside 
me in General Schoepf's quarters and he brought his hand 
down with considerable force on my knee, 'Don Carlos won't 
do,' said he, 'he won't do.' said I, 'General, there is consider- 
able feeing in the army on the subject.' 'O,' said he, 'George 
Thomas is the man, and we must have him.' I think General 
Buell was in the same building at the time, in the other part 
of the house having a conversation with General Crittenden. 



I remember that conversation with more distinctness from the 
pecularity of the language used by General McCook." 

Testimony of General Fry. 

Question. "What w-as the conduct of General Gilbert im- 
mediately previous to the fight, pending the fight and subse- 
quent to it?" (Perryville). 

Answer. "General Gilbert's conduct toward me was gen- 
erally courteous and polite. I had no reason to complain of 
him personally. I had heard a great deal of complaint from 
subordinate officers in regard to his conduct toward the men. 
They spoke of it as being unofficerlike and ungentlemanly. I 
however saw nothing of it myself. I saw very little of Gil- 
bert during the day of the fight. I cannot therefore say what 
part he took in the engagement." 

Question. "Before the Battle of Perryville did General 
Buell place over you any officer, with whose right and capacity 
to command you were dissatisfied?" 

Answer. "I cannot say that I was wholly dissatisfied my- 
self, that is on my own account. I was dissatisfied however, 
on account of the treatment of that officer placed over me by 
General Buell toward the officers of my immediate command. 
As to his right to command 1 I know nothing about it, except 
what I have heard since. I have learned that he had no right 
to command me, indeed I may say I heard it prior to his being 
relieved of his command but made no complaint. I obeyed 
his orders as cheerfully as though he had been my superior 
in rank." 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



l8 5 



Question. "State the name of this officer." 

Answer. "C. C. Gilbert." 

Question. "You say the Army of the Ohio was demor- 
alized at that time ; do you know positively the state of disci- 
pline in other divisions besides your own?" 

Answer. "I was thrown a great deal among other divi- 
sions and found them as much, if not more demoralized than 
my own." 

Question. "Do you know of any petition to remove Gen- 
eral Buell from command of the Army of the Ohio either be- 
fore or after the Battle of Perryville ?" 

Answer. "I know of only one and that was never pre- 
sented." 

Question. "What was this petition based upon?" 

Answer. "Simply upon the idea that those signing it, did 
not believe Buell was commanding the army in such a manner 
as to secure success for our arms." 

Question. "About how many colonels of regiments signed 
this petition ?" 

Answer. "I did not count the number. Eight or ten I 
suppose, perhaps more, not less I am satisfied." 

Question. "Did you consider at the time that this petition 
was well founded?" 

Answer. "I thought it was well founded at the time." 

Question. "Do you know the names of any officers of the 
rank of colonel or above that rank who signed this petition?" 

Answer. "Yes sir." 

Ouestion. "Will you state those names?" 



Answer. "General James B. Steedman, 3rd Brigade, 1st 
Division; Colonel John M. Harlan, 2nd Brigade, 1st Division; 
Colonel George, Second Minnesota; Colonel J. M. Connell, 
Seventeenth Ohio; Colonel M. B. Walker, 1st Brigade, 1st 
Division ; Major D- Ward, Seventeenth Ohio ; Colonel F. W. 
Lister, Thirty-first Ohio, and several others whose names I 
cannot now call to mind." 

Ouestion. "Did you sign this petition ?" 

Answer. "I decline to answer." 

The foregoing is taken from the official records, Series I, 
Vol. XIV, Part I. The testimony of all the principal officers 
of our Corps denounced Gilbert as a coward. General Steed- 
man said he learned after the battle Gilbert was an "uncon- 
firmed brigadier" but wore major general shoulder straps. 
Every brigadier or colonel in the corps outranked him. Their 
reports are also included in this work to explain to the mem- 
bers of the regiment, why we had to march from Corinth to 
Louisville without a fight. Buell never wanted to fight Bragg. 
The testimony of nearly all the officers of the army was, that 
the army was demoralized. Is it any wonder that such a state 
of affairs existed? Several good opportunities presented them- 
selves where Buell could have defeated Bragg, had he forced 
him to fight. It was the desire of the army to get into an en- 
gagement if nothing more than to relieve the monotony of 
constant marching. 

The Battle of Perryville ended Buell's career as a general 
and we never heard of him afterward. His orders to shoot 
every man caught foraging, issued in the early part of his 



1 86 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



service with the Army of the Ohio, prejudiced the men against 
him. Many believed him disloyal, especially at Huntsville, 
Ala., where the citizens said he was as "good a Southern man 
as Jeff Davis." Rumor had it that Buell and Bragg were 
brothers-in-law. Whether this was the case or not it makes 
little difference, but we do know he never would fight Bragg 
if he could help it. He was a failure and went into a "total 
eclipse." 

October 9, the day after the Battle of Perryville, we laid 
in camp and on the morning of the 10th we were ordered on 
the march. Along the fences we saw large numbers of dead 
Rebels, unburied. It was a ghastly sight. They were fearfully 
bloated and had turned black. In the sun, mortification had 
set in and the stench was something terrible. After march- 
ing about three miles we went into camp. Heard considerable 
firing on the right which indicated we were fighting Bragg's 
rear guard. 

On the nth we marched five miles, 12th five miles, 13th 
three miles, 14th fifteen miles, could hear cannonading on the 
right. On the 15th we made twelve miles and camped on 
Dick's River. We next camped at Crab Orchard. We remained 
here until October 20th when be broke camp and marched 
twenty miles, returning by the same road. The 21st we 
marched fifteen miles; 22nd twelve miles, while at this camp 
General Thomas ordered our regiment and the Tenth Ken- 
tucky paid. , 

On the 27th of October Buell was relieved and Major 
General William S. Rosecrans was placed in command. Gen- 



eral Rosecrans established headquarters at Nashville and at 
once proceeded to reorganize the army. The Department of 
the Ohio passed into history and became known as the Four- 
teenth Army Corps. 

Rosecrans found things in fully as bad shape as it had 
been represented. Officers and men were home on leaves of 
absence or furloughs. He issued a stringent order stating that 
any officer who applies for leave of absence his resignation 
would be immediately requested for "good-of the service." If 
men were sick enough for furlough and unfit for service, "dis- 
charge them at once." This order had the effect of cleaning 
the hotels at Indianapolis, Louisville and other points of of- 
ficers who had been lounging around and non-commissioned 
officers commanding companies at the front. 

Rosecrans found the cavalry "wasn't worth a damn." 
Good men but no organization. So the cavalry was turned 
over to Colonel R. H. G. Minty. It was but a short time un- 
til the 14th Corps was organized on a sound military basis, 
and the army felt as though there would be something doing 
and that before long. 

October 29th we resumed the march covering ten miles 
and went into camp at the foot of Muldraugh Hill. On the 31st 
we marched twenty-three miles, November 1st, fifteen miles, 
the 2nd fifteen miles, the 3rd sixteen miles, 4th twelve miles, 
5th in camp — weather cold. November 6th, fifteen miles, 7th 
fifteen miles, passing through Nicholasville; November 8th 
fifteen miles remaining in camp until the 12th, reaching Gal- 
latin, Tenn., on the 13th. November 14th we marched twenty 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



I8 7 



miles to Hartsville. The Tenth Kentucky and one section of 
Battery C, First Ohio Artillery was with us. At this point 
we were to guard a ford of the Cumberland River. John Mor- 
gan was in the neighborhood and we were sent to watch him. 
"John was good and let us rest in peace." We foraged over the 
country, but saw no signs of Morgan. He knew as well as we 
did what troops were there and John had no desire to tackle 
us. November 18th Colonel Kise and Captain Hamilton, Com- 
pany A, resigned and went home. Lieut. Colonel Carroll was 
promoted colonel ; Major Marsh B. Taylor, lieutenant colonel, 
and Job H. VanNatta, captain of Company D, was promoted 
to major. 

We remained at Hartsville until November 29th, when 
we were relieved by the One Hundred Fourth Illinois, One 
Hundred Sixth and One Hundred Eighth Ohio Infantry, Thir- 
teenth Indiana Battery and a squadron of the Second Indiana 
Cavalry. We then marched ten miles to Castillian Springs. 
Morgan was we'll aware of the movement, and on the 7th 
of December he attacked them. We heard the guns and were 
ordered out on double quick to Hartsville to re-enforce the 
garrison, but before our arrival he had captured the whole 
outfit and had paroled them. The sick in hospital he paroled, 
Frank Garver, Company G, being one of them. Garver said 
he saw the fight from beginning to end. He said the One 
Hundred Fourth Illinois and the Thirteenth Indiana Battery 
fought like demons, but the two Ohio regiments threw down 
their guns and surrendered. Had they fought and held Mor- 
gan until reinforcements could have reached them, Morgan 



would have been handsomely thrashed. The Rebel Morgan 
after capturing the Thirty-ninth Brigade at Hartsville retired 
towards Murfreesboro out of reach and prepared for a raid on 
Rosecrans' communications. 

Bragg at the time was laying at Murfreesboro with an 
army of 50,000 to 60,000 men of all arms preparng for an ag- 
gressive movement. Jeff Davis had visited the army at Mur- 
freesboro, made some speeches, reviewed the troops and at- 
tended the wedding of Morgan which took place at that time. 

In spite of his military failures Bragg retained the con- 
fidence of Davis, and the visit of the latter at this time was 
for the purpose of reviewing the army and agreeing on a plan 
of campaign which would dear Middle Tennessee of the Union 
armies. 

One feature of the campaign and the most prominent on 
the Rebel side was the cutting of Rosecrans' "Cracker Line" — 
the Louisville & Nashville Railroad. To General John Morgan 
was committed this work ; he was one of the most successful 
of all partizan leaders in the Rebel service, but would not make 
an even fair stand up fight ; the odds always had to be greatly 
in his favor before he would risk a battle. His capture of 
Moore's Brigade at Hartsville, was quite a feather in his cap 
and secured him his commission as a brigadier general. 

Morgan started on his raid from Alexandria, Tenn., De- 
cember 22nd 1 with'an effective force of 3100 guns and seven 
pieces of artillery divided into two brigades, the first under 
command of Colonel Basil W. Duke, the second under the 
command of W. P. C. Breckinridge. Pushing rapidly north 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



on the 26th he attacked and captured the stockade at Bacon 
Creek, only after a spirited resistance on the part of the Union 
forces. 

While these operations of the Rebels were taking place 
the Union forces had received information of them and on the 
night of December 25th, Colonel Harlan received orders to 
take his brigade and drive Morgan from the line of the road. 
On the morning of the 29th of December three trains took the 
brigade aboard and steamed off for Bowling Green, where we 
arrived late in the evening. The locomotive of the rear train 
was a wheezy old affair, breaking down and delaying the bri- 
gade. At Bowling Green we drew a day's rations and were 
compelled to leave Captain Sheetz and Sergeant W. F. Steven- 
son, Company D, the former being very ill and should not 
have started on such a campaign, and the latter in getting off 
the train injured his arm and was unable to use it. 

During the trip upward this day Colonel Harlan rode 
most of the way on the pilot of the leading locomotive, at 
times flankers and skirmishers were thrown out to prevent sur- 
prise or ambuscade. On the morning of the 27th we moved 
forward from Bowling Green ; again the rear train was de- 
layed by its defective locomotive so that the brigade did not 
get to Mumfordsville until in the night. The brigade was at 
once disembarked, and the battery horses, which had been for 
nearly forty hours without water or ofrage, properly cared 
for, fed and groomed. While on this expedition Lieutenant 
Hawkins, of Company D, was detailed to act as quartermaster 
for the regiment. 



The orders of General Fry to Colonel Harlan only re- 
quired the latter to proceed to Mumfordsville; yet, conceiving 
that he should under the circumstances follow up Morgan, we 
on the morning of the 28th, moved forward in the direction of 
Elizabethtown in the rear of the enemy. At Bacon Creek we 
got a ration of bread- and salt meat, on that night bivouacing 
north of Nolin. Early in the forenoon of December 29th we 
passed Elizabethtown where we found traces of the conflict 
of the previous day. The depot had been burned and a large 
amount of grain, which had been stored in it, was still smould- 
ering. A large brick building near which our troops had used, 
had been destroyed. The houses generally gave evidence in 
the numerous cannonball holes through their walls, of the 
Rebel bombardment, which was made without notifying the 
non-combatants. The enemy was close and there\vas no de- 
la)'. Morgan's forces had left the place in the early morning 
after having pillaged it of everything they could carry. Their 
trail was plain and we pushed on, soon turning to the north- 
east on a dirt road, running in the direction of Lebanon and 
Bardstown. Out about five miles word was brought that the 
enemy were about to cross the Rolling Fork, and the cavalry 
which had joined us at Mumfordsville with a section of South- 
wick's Battery, were pushed forward to hold the enemy until 
the infantry arrived. We soon got up and forming in line of 
battle pushed the enemy who resisted stubbornly. The enemy's 
force when it started on this campaign consisted of 3100 mus- 
kets and seven pieces of artillery, and were well mounted while 
our force consisted of 2900, and six pieces of artillery, includ- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



189 



ing the reinforcements which joined us at Mumfordsville, all 
well worn down with hard marching and loss of sleep. 

The boys stood right up to the work — not a singe shirk 
during the campaign. In line of battle our regiment (Tenth) 
was on the extreme right of the line and soon three companies 
of the right wing — F, D and I — under command of Major 
VanNatta, were ordered to clear the woods at our right and 
front, to accomplish this we had to cross an open field of some 
extent under the direct fire of the enemy. Luckily there were 
no casualties, although many narrow escapes. Among those 
was that of Sergeant Chris DeRolfe, of Company F. A bullet 
struck his haversack directly on the left hip and flattened it- 
self against his tin plate, making Chris limp quite considerably 
for some clays. The enemy had been pushing things to get 
across the river, which the}' finally accomplished ; being out 
of our reach. The fighting closed but not without serious loss 
to the enemy from the fire of our artillery, which was well 
handled. Among the enemy wounded was Colonel Basil Duke, 
second in command. Our loss was slight, Lieutenant Henry 
W. Pollis, of the battery was mortally wounded and died next 
day: the Fourth Kentucky had one man killed, in our own 
regiment Lewis W. Finney, Company I, was mortally wounded. 
The enemy being beyond our reach and the men weary and 
without rations at 2 o'clock in the morning of the 30th we 
started for Rolling Fork bridge. It had been Morgan's inten- 
tion to destroy this bridge, but our attack on him was in time 
to prevent it ; and the force he had detached for that purpose 
was hastily recalled to his main line. We moved as far north 



as Lebanon Junction, where we drew rations and clothing al- 
most verifying the remarks of the troops on the way up that 
we were going to Louisville for clothing. At Lebanon Junc- 
tion we again saw General C. C. Gilbert, who commanded the 
center of Buell's army at Perryville. He had been reduced 
and was now only a brigadier general; shortly after, a further 
reduction in rank was made and he became a plain captain in 
the regular establishment. The career of C. C. Gilbert as a 
major general, and then as a brigadier general of volunteers 
has much romance in it, and no one without an excessive 
amount of cheek and gall should ever have played the role he 
did. 

Morgan finding his game blocked started east in the di- 
rection of Bardstown. While we were lying at Lebanon Junc- 
tion the Battle of Stone River opened December 31, 1862 and 
ran to January 3, 1863. The first brigade of our division, par- 
ticipated in that sanguinary engagement. This closed our 
service for 1862. During the year we had marched more than 
1500 miles. Had been in two general engagements, both of 
which were opened by the Tenth Indiana ; had participated in 
skirmishes without number, but not suffering very heavy loss. 
The First brigade of our division was at Stone River, Third 
brigade at Pilot Knob and our (2nd) near Louisville. 
The division was scattered, but sent where they could do the 
most good. How would we fare the next year? What had 
the new year in store for us was what occupied the thoughts 
of the men as the old went out and the new came in. We 
shall see. 



190 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



The particulars concerning our "foot race" with Mor- 
gan's Cavalry is best explained by the report of Colonel Har- 
lan, commanding our brigade at the time. 

Munfordsville, Hart County, Ky. 

January 5, 1863. 
"Captain : — At a late hour during the night of the 25th of De- 
cember, while encamped at Gallatin, Tenn., I received through 
the division commander an order from the general commanding 
the department to proceed with my brigade to Bowling Green 
and Cave City, and drive from this line of the Louisville & 
Nashville Railroad the Rebel Cavalry, of Morgan, then north 
of the Cumberland River, and meditating, as was supposed, the 
destruction of that railroad. 

"At that time Morgan was supposed to be south of Green 
River, and at some point in the vicinity of Cave City or Glas- 
gow. The cars to convey my troops were to come from Nash- 
ville and on the morning of the 26th instant (and without un- 
necessary delay after the arrival of the transportation), I left 
Gallatin with my command, five regiments of infantry, and 
Southwick's Battery of Artillery. Simultaneously with this 
movement the Twelfth Division, under that accomplished and 
able officer, Brigadier General J. J. Reynolds, with a view to 
intercept Morgan, in the event he was driven back in the di- 
rection of either of those points. Three trains of cars, each 
drawn by one engine, was the amount of transportation fur- 
nished me by the railroad authorities at Nashville. The cars 
were barely sufficient to contain the men and horses, and the 



guns of the brigade, and subsequently developments proved 
either that the engines furnished were very defective or that 
enough engines were not furnished, for when the rear train, 
containing the Fourth Kentucky (Colonel Croxton), three com- 
panies of the Seventy-fourth Indiana, the battery horses and 
a part of the battery reached South Tunnel, six miles north of 
Gallatin, the engine attached thereto became entirely useless 
and the train was delayed until another engine could be sent 
from Nashville. 

While the rear train was halted at South Tunnel, waiting 
for another engine, the passenger train from Nashville (Con- 
ductor Taylor), arrived, but the conductor refused to permit 
his engine to be used to forward any rear train, notwithstand- 
ing Colonel Croxton advised him of the great importance of 
the expedition upon which the brigade was sent, and the im- 
minent danger which might result to the entire road from any 
delay. This I learn from Colonel Croxton. I have no personal 
knowledge of these facts, since I was in the advance train, some 
distance ahead of the rear train. Whether the conductor is 
to be blamed for refusing to permit his engine to be detached 
for the purpose indicated, I do not pretend to say ; that is for 
others to judge; my duty is simply to state the facts. 

"It may be proper also to state, that the track of the rail- 
road was when I left Gallalin in bad condition, from recent 
rain, though that difficulty might have been obviated had more 
engines been furnished. This unfortunate detention delayed 
the rear train, so it did not reach Bowling Green until 10 
o'clock of the night of the 26th. For that detention I am not 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



191 



in any wise responsible, as those concerned received from me 
full information as to the number of men, horses and guns 
for which transportation would be required. After my arrival 
at Bowling Green I learned that all of Morgan's force, was 
most probably north of Munfordsville, beyond the points to 
which I had been ordered, and it was evident that I must fol- 
low him beyond that place, in order to save any part of the 
railroad from destruction. 

"It was certainly known upon my arrival at Bowling 
Green, whether the track was clear to Munfordsville; but as 
soon as it was ascertained to be safe to proceed farther by rail, 
("which I did in part through dispatches from Colonel E. H. 
Hobson commanding at Munfordsville to General Manson at 
Bowling Green) I determined to push forward and save as 
much of the railroad as it was possible to do. 

"After supplying my command with one day's rations at 
Bowling Green (which were very kindly supplied by General 
Manson) I started for Munfordsville. When, however, the 
rear train had gone about 10 miles from Bowling Green, its 
engine got entirely out of order, and it became necessary to 
send to Bowling Green for another one. This second unfor- 
tunate detention delayed the rear train so it did not reach 
Munfordsville until 10 o'clock at night of the 27th. 

"My command disembarked immediately. Here I should 
state that the battery and other horses of the brigade had been 
on the cars for nearly forty hours, without a drop of water 
or a pound of forage. The}' were fed as well as the supply 
would permit : nothing but corn could be obtained at Munfords- 
ville to feed them. 



"My men wearied and fatigued from loss of sleep, and 
the crowded condition of the cars, as much fatigued as if 
they had been marching, lay down upon the damp ground, 
without tents to shelter them, to rest as best they could. 
Though I had received from the division commander at Cave 
City a dispatch ordering me to proceed to Munfordsville and 
drive Morgan from that vicinity. I conceived it to be my duty 
under my orders to go even farther, for I believed that Mor- 
gan, if unchecked, would destroy every bridge and structure 
on the entire road, thus interferring very materially with sup- 
plies for the main army beyond Nashville. He had destroyed 
the Bacon and Nolin Creek bridges, and had probably de- 
stroyed the bridge near Elizabethtown and captured our forces 
there, as he had already captured those at Bacon Creek and 
Nolin. My only hope was to save the immense trestle work at 
Muldraugh's Hill ; and failing in that to save the bridges over 
Rolling Fork, near Lebanon Junction, and over Salt River at 
Shepherdsville. These or any of these results I conceived to 
be of vital importance to the army, and I appealed to the of- 
ficers and men of my command to bear up under any priva- 
tions to accomplish it. 

"After resting the men but a few hours, I left Munfords- 
ville at 3 o'clock on the morning of the 28th, with my brigade, 
and also with the 13th Kentucky Infantry, Major Hobson and 
the Twelfth Kentucky Cavalry, Colonel Shanks, in all about 
2900 effective men. These last two regiments constituted a 
part of Colonel Hobson's command at Munfordsville and were, 
detached at my request to accompany me in the expedition. 



192 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



"On the route from Munfordsville to Elizabethtown no 
enemy was seen ; but upon my arrival at Elizabethtown on the 
morning of the 29th, I learned that Morgan had destroyed the 
trestle-work on the very day I left Munfordsville, and had, 
the previous night encamped ten miles east of Elizabethtown 
on the Rolling Fork, where the Elizabethtown and Bardstown 
road crosses that stream. I marched immediately in that direc- 
tion ordering the cavalry to go in advance. When we had gone 
about 5 miles from Elizabethtown, information reached me 
that the Rebels were, in. fact, at the place supposed and would 
probably soon cross the river. A section of Southwick's Bat- 
ter)' was ordered to join the cavalry and in conjunction with 
it to detain the Rebels at the crossing. He discovered in the 
plain below (our road from Elizabethtown was on a high ridge 
of Muldraugh Hill), a body of Rebel Cavalry, upon whom 
he ordered the artillery to open, which was promptly executed, 
resulting in the rapid dispersion of the Rebels. The infantry 
were ordered up double quick. I went to the front in person, 
and from a high hill, I saw quite distinctly, a large body of 
cavalry formed in line of battle near the river. Their officers 
were riding along their line, apparently preparing to give us 
battle. Knowing that Morgan had a larger force than I had, 
I proceeded cautiously and yet as expeditiously as the na- 
ture of the ground and the circumstances admitted. My men 
were formed in two lines ; skirmishers were thrown out from 
both infantry and cavalry, covering our whole front ; and were 
ordered to advance and engage the enemy, the whole line fol- 
lowing in close supporting distance. The firing commenced on 



the part of the Rebels on our left ; it was promptly and vig- 
orously responded to by my skirmishers and artillery. After 
a while the Rebels were driven away, and they then made some 
demonstration to occupy an eminence upon my right. To 
meet this the Tenth Indiana (Colonel Carroll) was ordered to 
occupy that eminence from which four companies were ordered 
to clear the woods on the right of my line. 

"The Fourth Kentucky, Colonel Croxton ; Fourteenth 
Ohio, Colonel Este ; the Seventy-fourth Indiana, Colonel Chap- 
man, were ordered to form on the left of the Tenth Indiana. 
A section of the battery and the Tenth Kentucky, Lieut. Colonel 
Hays, ordered to support it. This left the Thirteenth Kentucky, 
Major Hobson, on my left, supporting the section of the bat- 
tery there. The firing now became general along the right of 
our line of skirmishers, but the Rebels after an obstinate re- 
sistance broke and fled precipitately in every direction. Some 
struck out for the woods ; some went up the river as far as 
New Haven ; some swam the river with their horses. Farther 
pursuit that evening was impracticable, in the exhausted state 
of my men, they having left Munfordsville Sunday morning 
and came up with the enemy the succeeding day at 10 o'clock 
— 43 miles distant. The casualties of my command were as 
follows: Lieut. Henry W. Pollis, Battery C, First Ohio Light 
Artillery, fell at his post mortally wounded. He died the next 
day. He was a promising young officer and his loss will be 
severely felt. Private Lewis W. Finney, Company I, Tenth 
Indiana, was also mortally wounded, and died the 30th. Private 
John C. Osborn, Company A, Tenth Indiana, slightly wounded. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



193 



Thomas J. Burton, Company F, Fourth Kentucky, was instant- 
ly killed. The number of killed and wounded among the Rebels 
I have not had an opportunity to ascertain, because, for the 
most part they fought under cover of a thick, heavy woods, 
and we marched away from the scene of the conflict shortly 
after its conclusion for reasons hereinafter stated. It is cer- 
tain, however, that among the wounded was General Basil 
W. Duke, commanding a brigade under Morgan and who seems 
to be the life and soul of all the movements of the latter; and 
near where he was seen during the engagement ten dead 
horses were found in a space of twenty feet square, the work 
of the section of Southwick's Battery on the left. Some of the 
citizens in the vicinity informed me that the Rebel wounded 
were taken off and some of their dead thrown in the river ; 
whether this is true or not I will not pretend to say. The 
Rebels encamped that night near Boston, Nelson County. Their 
camp was equidistant with mine from the Rolling Fork bridge, 
which was believed at Elizabethtown to have been destroyed. 
But not being satisfied that such was the case I dispatched a 
messenger to that point, who returned at 11 130 o'clock in the 
night with the information that the bridge was still safe. My 
men were immediately aroused and at midnight I started for 
the bridge, reaching it before daylight of the 30th, and en- 
camped on the south side of it. Its safety however, is attrib- 
uted in part to circumstances which might appear singular, but 
which nevertheless, actually transpired. On the morning of 
the 29th, two of Morgan's regiments and a portion of his ar- 
tillery marched from their camp, on Rolling Fork, to the 



bridge (only four and a half miles distant), to destroy it, and 
at the same time capture our forces there. The garrison at 
that place consisted of two companies. The Rebels reached 
the vicinity of the bridge and were about to commence the at- 
tack, when the firing by my advance upon the remainder of 
their force notified them that an enemy was near at hand. 
They immediately commenced a rapid movement back to their 
camp, abandoned the attack upon our forces at the bridge and 
joined the remainder of the Rebel forces by the time the in- 
fantry came up with my advance. They arrived in time to 
participate in the scenes already described. 

"Upon my arrival at the Rolling Fork bridge I reported 
to the general commanding the district in which I was operating 
(General Boyle), for orders. He ordered me to remain in 
camp at the bridge, rest my men, protect the bridge and hold 
myself in readiness to meet an attack on the long bridge over 
Salt River at Shepherdsville, twenty miles from Louisville. On 
the morning of the 31st I crossed over to the north side of the 
Rolling Fork in obedience to orders from General Boyle, to 
resist an attack which the commandant at Shepherdsville be- 
lieved would be made upon that day. No attack having been 
made, I halted, under General Boyle's order at Lebanon Junc- 
tion until January 4, when I received orders to return to Gal- 
latin. I am now en route with my brigade for that place and 
will leave here as soon as transportation is afforded. I do 
not suppose that the engagement which my command had with 
Morgan's forces could properly be called a battle, the main 
bodies of the respective forces not being engaged. It was 



194 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



simply brisk skirmishing, exhibiting the utmost willingness, 
even anxiety, on the part of all the officers and men under my 
command, though outnumbered by the enemy in every respect, 
to engage him at all hazards ; and on the part of the Rebel chief- 
tain and his men, an entire unwillingness to meet them upon 
any fair terms. Every circumstance on the occasion indicated 
to my command that the enemy were disposed to give us bat- 
tle in force, yet, nowhere along the whole line was there to be 
observed any, even the slightest faltering by either officers or 
men. 

"To Colonels Este, Chapman, Carroll, Croxton and Shanks, 
Lieut. Colonel Hays, Major Hobson, Captain Southwick, of 
the battery, and to all their brother officers, I return my thanks 
for the promptness and cheerfulness with which on the line of 
march, they executed all my orders. 

"To the members of my staff, Lieutenants Leslie, McKay 
and Simpson and to Wellington Harlan, volunteer aide, I am 
indebted for the most valuable services rendered throughout 
the entire expedition. More efficient and competent officers 
are not to be found in the service. The men under my com- 
mand deserve the thanks of the country for the cheerfulness 
with which, with insufficient food and rest they bore up under 
the severest privations, determined to do all within their power 
of men to perform the important duty assigned them by the 
general commanding the department. 



"I claim for my command, that it saved the Rolling Fork 
bridge, and most probably prevented any attempt to destroy 
the bridge at Shepherdsville, thus saving from destruction 
property of immense value, and preventing the utter destruc- 
tion of the line of railway, by which our army, near Nashville, 
was mainly supported. And I submit whether the attack upon 
Morgans forces, the timely arrival of my command at Roll- 
ing Fork, did not prevent a raid upon other important points 
in Kentucky. It is very, certain that after my command drove 
the Rebel chieftain across Rolling Fork, in such a precipitate 
manner he abandoned the railroad, and very soon thereafter 
fled from the state, hotly pursued by other forces. 

"I cannot permit this occasion to pass without acknowl- 
edging the promptness with which that gallant officer Colonel 
E. H. Hobson, furnished me all the aid in his power, in the 
way of men, provisions, and transportation. The rapidity of 
my march is due in a great measure to the aid so cheerfully and 
generously rendered by him. Nor can I close this report with- 
out saying that had sufficient engines been furnished to draw 
trains, the railroad would have been damaged but very little, 
because without accident, I could have reached Munfordsville 
in abundant time to have caught up with the Rebels before 
they reached Elizabethtown ; certainly before they reached the 
trestle work on Muldraugh's Hill. 

"As the operations of my brigade were entirely within the 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



195 



western district of Kentucky, Brigadier General Boyle com- 
manding, I have deemed it my duty, in compliance with his re- 
quest to forward to him a copy of this report, so that he may 
be officially advised of all that was done by me within his de- 
partment in connection with the recent raid into Kentucky. 

I have the honor to be Very Respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

John M. Harlan, 
Capt. E. C. Denig, Col. commanding 2nd Brigade. 

Assistant Adjutant General, 1st Division. 



Indorsement. 
"Respectfully forwarded. Colonel Harlan for the energy, 
promptness and success in pursuing and driving Rebel forces 
from the railroad, is entitled to the gratitude not only of the 
people of Kentucky, but of the whole Army of the Cumber- 
land. He is, in my opinion entitled to special notice from the 
commanding general and anything he can say or do for him will 
be thankfully received. Speed S. Fry, 

Brigadier General, 
Commanding First Division. 



CHAPTER VII 



AFTER the battle of Stone River the army was again 
reorganized. The Fourteenth Army Corps was then 
known as the Army of the Cumberland, divided into 
three Corps as follows: Fourteenth Corps, Major General Geo. 
II. Thomas, Commanding; Twentieth Corps, Major General 
Alexander McD. McCook, Commanding; Twenty-first Corps, 
Major General Thomas L. Crittenden, Commanding. This re- 
organization remained until the Battle of Chickamauga. 

January ist, 1863, (New Year's) still found us at Leba- 
non Junction ; and on the 4th we received orders to return 
to Gallatin ; proceeding southward to Sonora, we halted and 
awaited transportation which finally reached us and we got back 
to Gallatin on the 8th where we found camp as we left it and 
supper awaiting us. Here we remained until the 13th when 
we took the cars and went to Nashville. 

The campaign after Morgan into Kentucky was eminently 
successful and while we were unable to prevent him cutting 
the railroad, being at Gallatin, Tenn., when he attacked Bacon 
Creek, Kentucky, we were able to drive him from the road, 
so that the damage he was able to do was small and soon re- 
paired. While making part of the distance by rail, yet in 
thirty-six hours immediately preceding the attack at Rolling 
Fork we marched forty-three miles, which was no mean work 
when we take into consideration the stops we were compelled 
to make on the route. 



We arrived at Nashville on the afternoon of January 
13, 1863; it was quite warm and we were moved out west of 
the city with orders to report to General Stanley, chief of cav- 
alry. After getting into Tullahoma and Shelbyville, Bragg had 
ordered General Forrest to harass the river communications 
of General Rosecrans. Hovering about the city for some days 
closely watched by Stanley, Forrest made off in the direction 
of Fort Donelson. He was a bold, wily leader, and his men 
used to striking hard blows where least expected. He was 
fifteen miles ahead of Stanley before we got up, but operating 
on interior lines it was hoped we would come up with him, 
and force him back on the main army. It was for this pur- 
pose we had been ordered to report to Stanley. There were 
three regiments of us as memory serves me now, the Fourth 
Kentucky, Tenth Kentucky and the Tenth Indiana, all under 
the command of Colonel Croxton of the Fourth Kentucky. 
The other two regiments (Fourteenth Ohio and Seventy- fourth 
Indiana) and the battery under command of Colonel Harlan, 
proceeded to LaVergne — on the Murfreesboro pike. 

Drawing three days rations about 2 o'clock in the morning 
of the 14th, we moved out on the Charlotte Pike, and about 
8 o'clock came up to the cavalry and cooked breakfast. Short- 
ly after we began our march it began to snow and kept it up all 
day. 

While we were eating breakfast the cavalry moved out 
and we soon followed. Passing from a small creek our road 



198 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



laid directly on a "hog's back" so called, for most of the day ; 
descending from this we found our road following the valley 
of a small creek, whose torturous ways caused us to wade it 
from one bank to the other "times innumerable" during the 
afternoon. Finally debouching into the valley of Harpeth 
River a short distance above where it empties into the Cum- 
berland, we found the former at high tide and no means of 
crossing.. So about dark we bivouacked in a field of wheat 
stubble. It was still snowing hard. About 9 o'clock at night 
it turned very cold and by morning it was down to zero. The 
blankets of the men were frozen fast to the ground, and many 
were torn and rendered useless. About 8 o'clock on the 
morning of the 15th we started back to Nashville, arriving at 
dark. It was so cold and the snow so deep, it seemed as if 
the men would freeze before they could get their dog tents up, 
and fires built. We succeeded finally and by 10 o'clock had 
matters so shaped that we could get supper and retire for the 
night. 

This trip was probably the most severe of any during our 
term of service, marching twenty miles in snow that was shoe 
top deep and the thermometer at zero. We remained in camp 
until January 18th. the weather moderating considerable, and 
marched sixteen miles on the Murfreesboro pike, and on the 
20th marched into LaVergne. We found there had been a 
cavalry fight and the Rebels had set fire to the town and burned 
it. We remained in camp until the 22nd when the Tenth was 
detached fro mthe brigade and sent to Stewart's Creek. At 
this point the regiment was divided, the right wing under com- 



mand of Colonel Carroll was stationed on the pike, and the left 
wing under command of Major VanNatta, was stationed on 
the railroad. Forts were erected at both places. On the pike 
it was manned by four pieces of artillery and on the left by 
two pieces. Company E was sent to Smyrna and Company K 
to Overall's Creek about 5 miles south of Stewart's Creek. At 
both of these places were block houses for the protection of the 
men against cavalry raids. The regiment then settled down 
to routine duties. 

A most amusing incident occurred as we passed through 
Nashville. John M. Gear, of Company D, getting tired of his 
overcoat, dropped into a bakery and traded it for seven pies ; 
a short distance beyond the regiment stopped and during the 
halt Gear ate the whole of his seven pies. The remarks made 
by the boys during this gastronomical feat would not look well 
in print. He kept up until we got to LaVergne and then went 
to the hospital. 

The year 1863 was a memorable one. The Copperheads 
of the North were busy organizing a treasonable order known 
as the "Knights of the Golden Circle." They flooded the 
camps with letters urging desertion and promising protection 
from arrest. Peace meetings were held throughout Indiana, 
Ohio and Illinois, endeavoring to discourage enlistments and 
otherwise hampering the administration.. In February a closed 
carriage with a heavy escort passed our camp going to Mur- 
freesboro, we found out afterward it was C. L. Valandingham 
being sent South to join his friends. His trip was conducted 
with the greatest secrecy, as it was afraid if Ohio soldiers got 



HISTORY OK THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



199 



hold of him they would kill him, which they undoubtedly would 
have done, had they known who was in the carriage. He was 
escorted to the Rebel lines under a flag of truce, turned over 
to Rebel officers who "receipted" for him, and our escort re- 
turned. When the escort reached the Rebel lines the officers 
in command asked "Who have you here?" "C. L. Valanding- 
ham, of Ohio, one of your warmest friends. For God's sake 
keep him south." The Rebel officers said they had no use for 
such as he, and treated him very cooly. He was finally sent to 
Richmond, where Jeff Davis put him on a blockade runner and 
sent him to Canada. 

So. many letters had been received urging the men to desert 
that the boys became so incensed that they held an indignation 
meeting in camp on April 30th. Captain James H. Boyl, Com- 
pany C, was called to the chair, and William S. Cresap, Chap- 
lain, was appointed secretary. The object of the meeting hav- 
ing been stated by the chairman, a committee on resolutions 
was appointed, consisting of Surgeon William H. Martin, 
Major J. H. VanNatta and Lieutenant Martin T. Jones, of 
Company A. The committee through Surgeon Martin, reported 
the following resolutions : 

"WHEREAS, Upon numerous occasions, members of this 
regiment have been written to by friends at home inquiring 
how we felt in regard to the prosecution of the war under late 
acts of our Government ; and 

"Whereas, Believing that although we are soliders doing 
duty as such in the field, to save our Country from the deadly 
grasp of treason, we have not forfeited our citizenship, nor 



the privilege of giving utterance to our political sentiments, 
take this public manner of answering all inquiries of our 
friends, and proclaim aloud our continued loyalty to the best 
government on earth, and, our bitter scorn and contempt for 
the scheming demagogues and traitorous scoundrels at home 
who are seeking its dismemberment ; therefore be it, 

"Resolved, That we will support the Government of the 
United States in its efforts to crush this wicked rebellion, un- 
der any and all circumstances ; that we will not stop to inquire 
whether any measures it may choose to adopt to stifle treason 
and restore our glorious Union — is impolitic or unconstitution- 
al, but will go right on .with the work we enlisted for, and 
never lay down our arms until rebellion has ceased in the land. 

"Resoved, That the history of the world does not show 
another nation upon the earth, whose people so freely enjoy 
the inalienable rights of man, where labor was so well com- 
pensated, merit so generally rewarded and where all the bless- 
ings and emoluments of social and political life so readily ob- 
tained and so thoroughly protected. 

"Resolved, That the East, the West, the North and the 
South were equally the recipients of this national favor and 
protection. The same starry banner waved over every portion 
of our once happy country, and the attempt of the Southern 
States by force of arms to destroy this national harmony has 
no parallel in the history of nations for wickedness, is with- 
out justification, and should not only cause the swords of all 
loyal men of our own country to leap from their scabbards, but 



200 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



should, and does, call down the condemnation of the friends of 
man of every clime. 

"Resolved, That we will not countenance any armistice 
or compromise. We left our peaceful homes, and all that was 
dear to us to put down this accursed rebellion, by force of 
arms, and never until the rebels cease to wage war against us 
and return to their allegiance, will we cease our hostilities to 
them. 

"Resolved, That we look upon the so called "Conserva- 
tion Party" and "Peace Party" as twin children of darkness; 
that their efforts tend to the development of treason ; that 
they have stolen the livery of Heaven in which to serve the 
devil, and that we utterly detest and scorn their principles. 

"Resolved, That our efforts to plant once more the Stars 
and Stripes on every foot of ground belonging to the Union, 
we look upon all who are not for us are against us. For sake 
of our country we have buried all party ties, and now rally 
alone as a band of brothers, under the proud flag of Washing- 
ton followed to victory and which has given us a name among 
the first nations of the earth, and beneath its glorious folds 
we pledge ourselves to sustain its honor untarnished and to 
support with all our means every measure deemed necessary 
by our civil rulers to put down this unholy rebellion 

"Resolved, That in the prudence, patriotism and military 
skill of Major General Rosecrans, we have unbounded con- 
fidence, assured that under the blessings of Almighty God, 
victory will continue to perch upon his banners, until treason 
and rebellion be put down in the land. 



"Resolved, That in Governor O. P. Morton we recognize 
the soldiers' friend, the able governor and patriotic man. For 
his friendship we extend him our grateful thanks, for his ex- 
ecutive ability we respect him, for his unflinching patriotism 
we honor him. In any emergency for the protection or pro- 
motion of the welfare of our beloved country we pledge the 
hearty support of the members of the Tenth Indiana- 

"The resolutions were read to the entire regiment and 
acted upon seriatum and unanimously adopted. 

"On motion resolved, That the Nashville Union, Indiana 
State Journal, Lafayette Journal and Courier and county 
papers in the Eighth Congressional District are requested to 
publish the proceedings of this meeting. 

W. S. Cresap, Chaplain, James H. Boyl, Co. C, 

Secretary. Chairman" 

While Company K was at Overall's Creek they obtained 
from Stone River a very large mussel shell, from which they 
made a cross two and one-half inches long by one and one- 
half inches wide, to be presented to General Rosecrans. Many 
of the boys in the three months' service served under General 
Rosecrans in the West Virginia campaign and the Battle of 
Rich Mountain. It was a beautiful pearl color and had very 
much the appearance of pearl. It was sent to Nashville where 
it was mounted with gold at the tips and a plate inserted in 
the shaft upon which was engraved : "Presented to General 
Rosecrans by Company K, Tenth Indiana." 

The presentation was made by Lieutenant Hunt, of Com- 
pany K, and was answered by General Rosecrans in a letter 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOEUNTEER INFANTRY 



201 



of peculiar beauty of expression and literary excellence, which 
read as follows : 

"Headquarters Department of the Cumberland,. 

Murfeesboro, June 23, 1863. 
Lieutenant : — Present my thanks individually to the of- 
ficers and men of Company K, Tenth Indiana, for the beauti- 
ful touching memento of their, regard, which they have sent 
me. The remembrance of our first service together to which 
your letter alludes touches me to the heart. 

"The emblem itself is all the more expressive as it re- 
minds me of the foundation of all my hopes for myself and 
our country both here and in the great hereafter. 

"May God bless and keep that noble company, I pray, 
through the merits of His cross and suffering. Accept my 
thanks for yourself personalty. 

W. S. Rosecrans, Maj. Genl." 

During our stay at Stewart's Creek nothing of importance 
occurred excepting some forty slaves came to the line and 
requested to be taken to the commandant of the post- They 
were of all ages and sizes, both sexes being represented. They 
were conducted to Col. Carroll and said to him as "they were 
free they thought they would leave the old plantation and go 
among the 'Linkum Sogers.' " 

Colonel Carroll turned them over to Surgeon William- 
son, who quartered them in the cabins back of the hospital 
and set them to work. Some he put in the kitchen, some to 
washing, attending the sick and policing quarters. They seemed 



willing and glad to do any kind of work. As a general thing 
they were polite and courteous. Some were inclined to be 
obstinate and rebellious, but it did not take Dock long to 
straighten them out. About three days after their arrival, 
one morning the pickets brought in a half dozen citizens who 
claimed the "niggers" and said they had come to take them 
home. They were conducted to Surgeon Williamson who, when 
he found out their errand, informed then in language more 
forcible than polite, that they couldn't have one of them and 
if they didn't make themselves scarce at once he would hang 
every one of them. The planters "ripped and swore" like 
pirates, damned the government and all the soldiers. Carroll 
ordered the guard to escort them through the lines and if they 
returned to shoot every one of them. They then mounted 
their nags and left. The darkies, who had become terribly 
frightened at the sight of their masters, came out of their 
hiding places, sang, danced jigs and cut all kinds of antics. 
They were kept in camp until we received orders to move, 
and to send all the niggers to Nashville. 

The teams were going to Nashville for supplies and the 
darkies were loaded in the wagons. They "cried, howled and 
bellered," thinking they were to be sent back into slavery. 
After considerable talk and explaining they quieted down. But 
they hated to leave the camp and were very profuse in their 
thanks for the kind manner in which they were treated, and 
hoped God would help and protect all the "Linkum Sogers." 
Upon their arrival at Nashville they were assigned to the 
contraband camp.- - .... 



202 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Our stay at Stewart's Creek was pleasant and extended 
from January 22, 1863 to June 2, 1863, when we rejoined 
our division at Triune, Tenn. There was plenty of picket 
duty, fatigue duty and foraging, all of which was performed 
with alacrity and interspersed, as we went along, with lots of 
fun. 

The fort which we built here was a small earthwork, suf- 
ficient for four guns, and after its completion was occupied 
by a section of Southwick's battery. It was named Fort Taylor, 
in honor of Lieutenant Colonel Marsh B. Taylor of our regi- 
ment. During the first part of April Colonel Carroll, who had 
been home on a leave of absence, returned, and shortly after, 
one night about two o'clock, camp was aroused and all the 
ammunition transferred to the fort. What was the immediate 
cause was not known, and whatever it was, the ammunition 
was but little more secure than in regimental quarters as there 
was no magazine to stow it in. This was soon remedied and 
a magazine built. 

On June 2, 1863, the One Hundred and Second Illinois 
Infantry relieved us at Stewart's Creek and. leaving camp at 
4 o'clock p. m., we marched to Lavergne and started for Triune. 
Tenn., marching 17 miles, arriving about 4 o'clock, p. m., June 
3. Our arrival once more concentrated the Third Division 
now under the command of Brigadier General John M. Bran- 
nan. We had not yet seen General Brannan and from reports 
which had reached us we were not favorably impressed with 
him. We soon made his acquaintance and became warm ad- 
mirers of the general. He was by birth an Indianian and was 
appointed from there to West Point, of which he was a gradu- 



ate. By a series of inspections he was soon well acquainted 
with our condition and the knowledge which our officers had 
of real war. It was current talk that at one of his inspections 
he asked the officers of one of the companies of our regiment 
the amount of a soldier's daily, ration, which he was unable 
to give. It was not long, however, until they knew. His in- 
spections extended not only to the arms and physical condi- 
tion of the men, but to our quarters. While here he also 
instituted a series of brigade drills, covering almost every 
conceivable evolution likely to arise on the field. These drills 
the men declared delightful and were welcomed as a relief from 
the harder and more exhaustive movements of the battalion. 
Among the troops at Triune was the First East Tennessee Cav- 
anly under Colonel Jim Brownlow, who had much of the spirit 
and dash of his celebrated father, "Parson" Brownlow, of 
Knoxville. Forrest and Wheeler, of the rebel army, were con- 
stantly hovering near and Colonel Jim and his East Tennessee 
boys crossed swords almost daily. Sometimes their skir- 
mishes amounted to almost a battle and all forces present 
were called to arms. While the work was not laborious, it 
was sufficient to keep us busy; and under General Steadman, 
who commanded our brigade, we made an expedition some 
distance in the direction of Shelbyville, but nothing came of 
it. The health of the division was splendid, its dicipline 
superb, its confidence in its commander unlimited. In fact, 
no division entered on the Tullahoma Campaign, which began 
June 23, 1863, in better condition than the Third Division, 
Fourteenth Army Corps. 



HISTORY OP THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



203 



Early the following morning, June 23, Companies I and 
D were detailed to guard the provision train. The division 
moved to Fairfield, on Duck River, at which place quite a 
skirmish occurred. Moving from Fairfield eastward on the 
Jackboro road, night found the division at Manchester, where 
General Thomas' command was concentrating. The rebels 
failed from some cause to destroy the bridge over Duck River 
at Manchester. The train got in about midnight after a very 
hard clay's work. 

From Manchester the road to Tullahoma runs in a south- 
westerly direction and on this our division moved out about 
six miles, camping at Concord Church. The skirmishing had 
been brisk all day, retarding the progress of the division but 
little. June 24 we skirmished with the enemy and arrived at 
Hoover's Gap in time to see the army driven out by Wilder's 
Brigade. 

We pressed forward ; our rations were getting low and 
our men foraged to some extent, finding plenty of cattle, 
hogs, sheep,. chickens, etc. During the night, at Concord Church, 
several regiments passed us to the front. About 2 o'clock 
p- m., our regiment went on the skirmish line, remaining until 
evening when we were relieved by the Eleventh Ohio and we 
rejoined our brigade at the church. During this clay Captain 
Stopford, A. A. G. on Steedman's staff, had his horse shot 
from under him 'by our own men by mistake. The outlook 
strongly indicated a battle. General Reynolds' division was 
at hand — the enemy was stubborn and contesting every inch 
of ground, not in heavy numbers, but sufficient to make our 



advance cautious. The country was susceptible of defense 
by a small force against great odds, and Bragg was making 
the most of it in our immediate front. While we were plod- 
ding along in the direction of Tullahoma the other portions 
of the army were keeping up their part. Wilder, with his 
brigade, had been detached on an expedition to the enemy's 
rear, and had cut his communications and destroyed the rail- 
road for some distance in the neighborhood of Dechard. When 
this was done Bragg began his retreat ; he had been preparing 
for it before. It was not his intention to give us battle unless 
unforeseen circumstances compelled him to do so. On the part 
of Rosecrans the campaign was one of strategy. Outside of 
some brisk skirmishes there was no fighting, the Union casual- 
ties were less than 600. Our captures from the enemy were 
over 1600 prisoners and 11 pieces of artillery. 

June 29 we were hotly engaged. The skirmish line, under 
command of Major VanNatta. It was in a veritable hornets' 
nest and General Steeclman, watching the fight, expected to see 
every man killed. He was profuse in his compliments to the 
major and the men under his command. June 30 we charged 
the works and entered Tullahoma, driving everything before 
us. 

During the month of May and after the authorities at 
Washington were "nagging the life out of Rosecrans for a 
- forward movement — for him to get busy" and telegrams poured 
in on him from Stanton and Halleck. The whole army as 
well as General Rosecrans knew we could make no headway 
owing' to the impassible conditions of the roads, lack of forage, 



204 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



etc. The country had been stripped by both armies, and the 
only chance for supplies was by a single line of road with a 
scarcity of rolling stock. But on the ist of June, 1863, the 
army began its movement. 

To show and the better to explain the above statement, 
the official correspondence is herewith submitted : 

"Headquarters Department of the Cumberland. 

Murfreesboro, June 23, 1863. — Midnight. 
"Major General Thomas, Commanding Fourteenth 
Corps. — General : — The general commanding directs you to im- 
mediately put your command in readiness for marching, with 
12 days' rations. The rations will consist of hardbread, coffee, 
sugar and salt and a half ration of pork. The remainder of 
the meat ration will be drawn on the hoof. You will prepare 
to move in light marching order, taking the smallest practicable 
amount of transportation and baggage. Put all your extra 
wagons into park on the north side of Stone River under 
cover of the works and send all your extra baggage to the 
fortifications for safe keeping. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. Garfield. 
Brigadier General and Chief of Staff." 

This was just before the battle of Hoover's Gap, (24th), 
and evidently had reference to the First and Second Divisions 
of our corps. We were already on the march and "flying very 
light," having nothing but what we could carry. On the same 
day General Thomas was instructed to get ready for business 
as per the following: 



"Headquarters Dept. of the Cumberland. 

Murfreesboro, June 23. 
"Major General Thomas : — The general commanding di- 
rects you to advance with your command tomorrow, moving 
on the Manchester Pike and encamp in the vicinity of the 
Millersburg road, where you can find water, and be ready to 
move to the support of McCook at Millersburg and go down 
to Beech Grove or Manchester. The headquarters of the gen- 
eral commanding will be at the crossing of the Big Spring 
Branch with the Manchester Pike, after 12 M. tomorrow. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. A. Garfield. 
Brigadier General and Chief of Staff." 

From this time up to June 22, routine duty and brigade 
drills constituted our amusements. On June 23 we broke camp 
and started on the Tullahoma Campaign. Marched 20 miles, 
on the 24th ; 25 miles, 25th ; 20 miles on the 26th, 8 miles 
to Hoover's Gap, arriving there about dark, and formed line 
of battle, but did not get into action, as Wilder's Bridage had 
been fighting them and had repulsed the enemy before rein- 
forcements arrived. We then received marching orders as 
per the following order : 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps. 

Camp near Hoover's Gap, Tenn. 
June 24, 9:45 p. m. 
Brigadier General Brannan : — Your note received. You 
are directed by the general commanding to march with your 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



205 



command as early as possible tomorrow morning and join this 
command. The road comes in at Mr. Brown's. If you re- 
ceive no orders to the contrary, join the command in front. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Geo. E. Flint. 
A. A. G. and Chief of Staff." 

We kept on, nothing apparently in our front and of course 
no fighting. Roads were terrible and progress slow. Thomas 
had heard nothing from us so far, as shown by the following: 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps. 

Hoover's Gap, June 25, 1863. 
"Major General Rosecrans: — General Reynolds is in po- 
sition at the Gap within a half mile of the crossing of the . 

The enemy appear to be in considerable force on the rcjad 
from Beech Grove to Fairfield. It is thought to be B. R. 
Johnson's Brigade. Cheatham's and Cleburn's Divisions are 
said to be at Fairfield. Rosseau is close behind. Have not 
heard anything from Brannan yet nor can we hear any firing 
from McCook, from this place- 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant. 

George H. Thomas. 
Major General, U. S. V., Commanding." 

The "Johnnies" were in front without a doubt, but they 
were evidently retreating to Tullahoma as there was no show 
of an engagement. Thomas reports as follows : 



"Headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps. 

Hoover's Gap, June 25, 1863, 3 p. m. 
"Major General Rosecrans.— Commanding Dept. of the 
Cumberland. — General : — Dispatch, 1 p. m., received. I have 
been to the front myself. The enemy apparently have but one 
brigade on the Fairfield Road; either a part or one brigade 
on the Manchester Pike, beyond Beech Grove. Has not at- 
tempted to drive us, therefore I think he is acting on the de- 
fensive. I propose concentrating my corps here this p. m. 
and making an advance at daylight tomorrow on Fairfield and 
Manchester Pike; Rosseau on Manchester and Reynolds and 
Brannan on Fairfield ; Negley in reserve if you approve. 

Very respectfully, 

Geo. H. Thomas. 
Major General, U. S. V., Commanding." 

"Headquarters Army of the Cumberland. 

In the Field, Big Spring Branch. 

June 25, 1863. — Midnight. 

"Major General Thomas: — The general commanding di- 
rects you to throw forward such a part of your force as you 
may deem sufficient to threaten Fairfield, and create the im- 
pression that you design an attack on that place. In the mean- 
time push your column toward Manchester by way of Matt's 
Hollow. It will be best to send your mounted brigade around 
by McBride's Branch, the head of Matt's Hollow, and thus 
facilitate the taking of that defile. Make as much of the 



2o6 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



distance to Manchester as possible tomorrow. After 2 o'clock 
tomorrow department headquarters will be at Beech Grove. 

A^ery respectfully, 

J. A. Garfield. 
Brigadier General and Chief of Staff." 

The regiment will remember this march, our objective 
point being Tullahoma, and we were skirmishing all the way 
from this point to Tullahoma. It was evident from the move- 
ments of the enemy that Bragg intended to avoid a general 
engagement as he was aiming for Chattanooga, as the corres- 
pondence will show. Rosecrans from the following communi- 
cation, was preparing for a "foot race," and a fast one at that : 

"Headquarters Department of the Cumberland. 

Manchester, Tenn. — June 28, 1863- 

"Major General George H. Thomas: — The general com- 
manding has noticed with great regret the criminal neglect to 
obey department orders in reference to the reduction of bag- 
bage. If this army fails in the great object of the present 
movement it will be mainly due to the fact that our wagons 
have been loaded down with unauthorized baggage. Officers 
and soldiers who are ready to die on the field do not hesitate 
to disgrace themselves and imperil the army by luxuries un- 
worthy of a soldier. 

"Second. — The general commanding directs that all bag- 
gage trains be reduced to the minimum, to the effect that all 
tents except shelter (dog) tents, and one wall tent to each 
regiment, be dispensed with. The ammunition now carried in 



company wagons will be turned over to the division ordnance 
officers, who will be furnished with a sufficient number to 
transport it. This will enable the transportation of each regi- 
ment to be reduced to 7 wagons, which reduction will be at 
once made.- All wagons in excess of this allowance will be 
turned over to the division quartermaster, who will, under the 
direction of the chief quartermaster of each corps, organize 
them into a supply train for the division. Surplus baggage will 
be sent to Murfreesboro by the returning trains for storage. 
The wagons will carry five clays' rations of short forage, one 
tent to a regiment and medical supplies. All commissioned 
officers will carry one ration on their person. 

"Third. — All knapsacks will be sent to the rear, and noth- 
ing carried by the men except shelter (dog) tent, blanket, I 
shirt, 1 pair socks, and 1 pair drawers. 

"Fourth. — Corps and division commanders will be held 
responsible for throwing out of every unauthorized article of 
baggage. Any quartermaster whose train shall be found carry- 
ing chairs and such other needless weight (usually the fruits 
of thieving), will at once be arrested and the officers claiming 
it be severely punished. Very respectfully, 

J. A. Garfield. 

Brigadier General and Chief of Staff." 

This accounts for our "flying light" two days before the 
Battle of Tullahoma. No knapsacks being allowed, what extra 
underwear and socks the boys had, were wrapped in the 
blankets and thrown over their shoulders. This, in many in- 
stances, compelled the men to go without clothes while they 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



207 



did their washing, but most of the men kept their knapsacks 
as we had them when we reached Chickamauga. The follow- 
ing circular shows that we were getting ready to drive Bragg 
out of Tullahoma, which we did on the 30th : 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps. 

Manchester, June 28, 1863. 
"(Circular) — Division commanders are directed to have 3 
days' rations issued to their respective commands, commencing 
from tomorrow morning, the rations will be carried in haver- 
sacks — to include .the 29th and 30th days of June and 1st day 
of July, and to hold their commands in readiness to march at 
a moment's notice. — By command of Major General Thomas. 

Geo. E. Flynt. 
A. A. G-, Chief of Staff." 

On the 28th we marched six miles, on the 29th Major Van 
Natta was sent to the front with 5 companies of the Tenth In- 
diana, 5 from the Fourth Kentucky and 4 from the Tenth Ken- 
tucky to strengthen the picket line and drive the enemy from 
their position. It was an important move and the major and his 
men were subjected to a raking fire from the enemy. General 
Steedman was closely watching the movement and expected to 
see the major and his men all shot down. The major fought 
the enemy with equal desperation and finally ordered a bayonet 
charge, drove them from their position and held the ground, but 
not without constant fighting. The major and the men under 
his command were highly complimented by the general for their 
daring and persistent fighting which brought success. General 



Steedman said he could not see how any man got out alive. 
It was a veritable "hornets' nest-" 

On the 30th we were ordered forward and the entire line 
was ordered to charge the breastworks which they did with 
a rush and a cheer, driving the enemy before them through Tul- 
lahoma and beyond. The object of the campaign had been ac- 
complished and Bragg was in full retreat toward Chattanooga. 

After we had driven the enemy in front of us during the 
entire campaign the "powers" at Washington "threw another 
fit." They were still dissatisfied and restless as will be seen 
by the following to General Rosecrans : 

War Department, 
Washington, June 25, 1863. 2:30 P. M. 

"The great object you will have in view is to drive Bragg 
from East Tennessee before he can be reinforced by Johnston. 
It is said supplies will be found in abundance in the valley, if 
the enemy is not allowed time to take them away, and moreover 
that there is a large loyal population ready to declare for the 
Union. The President has repeatedly promised these people 
relief and has repeatedly and repeatedly urged that forces for 
this purpose be pushed forward. The pressure for this move- 
ment at this time is so strong that neither you nor I can resist 
it. Unless it is made while Grant's army occupies Johnston 
there will not be another opportunity this year. 
Very Respectfully, 

H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief." 

The above will sound queer to the members of the Army 
of the Cumberland. We were driving Bragg from Middle 



2o8 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Tennessee. More than ioo miles from the seat of war in East 
Tennessee. Burnside was up there (Knoxville) with a large 
force and Buckner, of the Rebel Army, was opposing him. As 
to the valley's being full of provender this was a great error, 
as Bragg's Army had cleaned everything out. Rosecrans re- 
plied as follows : 

Nashville, Temr, June 25, 1863, 9 P. M. 
"Major General Halleck, Washington. 

"Your dispatch received. All is very good. Your views ac- 
cord with my own. All your suggestions about baggage and ra- 
tions have been anticipated and carried out from the beginning 
of our movement, and are now being carried out with all the 
energy of which we are capable. We never think of moving with 
any but the minimum baggage, nor of taking anything but essen- 
tial parts of rations ; but to move our troops beyond our means 
of supply would but break down and disable both men and 
horses without results. This I am sure you do not desire. Any 
disappointment that may be felt at the apparent slowness of 
our movements would be readily removed by a knowledge of 
the obstacle and a true military appreciation of the advantage 
of not moving prematurely. 

"I confess I should like to avoid such remarks and letters 
as I am receiving lately from Washington, if I could do so 
without injury to the public service. You will, I think, find the 
officers of this army as anxious for success, and as willing to 
exert themselves to secure it as any member of the Government 
can be. As to subsistence being drawn from the country over 
which we are to travel to Chattanooga, it is always barren — 



with but few fertile spots. These spots have been gleaned and 
scraped by Rebels with a powerful cavalry force ever since 
last winter. We shall get some hay and cattle in the region 
of Fayetteville, Huntsville and south of there — none south 
or east of us. We shall move promptly and endeavor not to 
go back. What movements of General Grant affect us? 
Very Respectfully, 

W. S. Rosecrans, Major General." 
This seemed to hurt Halleck and he transmitted the fol- 
lowing : 

"Headquarters of the Army, 

Washington, D. C., July 25, 1863. 
"(Private and Confidential). 
"Major General Rosecrans, Nashville. 

"General: — I preceive from the tone of your dispatch to- 
day, that you are displeased at my urging you to move forward 
your army against Bragg. In other words, General, while I 
am blamed here for not urging you forward more rapidly, you 
are displeased at my doing so. Whatever I have written or 
telegraphed to you on this subject has been from motives of 
kindness and friendship. It was only my desire to impress upon 
you the wishes and expectations of the Government, in order 
that you might be fully acquainted with those wishes. Having 
now explained to you frankly that you can have no possible 
grounds for your tone of displeasure toward me, I shall not 
again refer to the matter. Very Respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief-" 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



209 



Hal leek in this last reply could have been more explicit 
and said that Stanton was deviling the life out of him and the 
politicians of the country were nagging Lincoln to death. 
Neither of them knew the conditions that surrounded the 
Army of the Cumberland, the obstacles that presented them- 
selves daily — bad roads, scarcity of forage and other supplies. 
On this same day, July 25, at 9:30 P. M., General Sheridan 
telegraphed to Rosecrans that Bragg was at Chattanooga. A 
Rebel lieutenant deserted and gave Sheridan the information. 



That he was fortifying all the surrounding country. The lieu- 
tenant furnished Sheridan maps of the country between Bridge- 
port and Chattanooga, showing where batteries had been erect- 
ed. So it was evident that when we left Winchester for 
Chickamauga (or Chattanooga) we would have nothing in our 
front except some cavalry scouting, to ascertain the location 
or movements of our army. This was the condition of affairs 
while we were in camp at Winchester. 



CHAPTER VIII 



THE occupation of Tullahoma by our forces ended the 
Tullahoma Campaign. July 1st, 1863, we continued 
the pursuit of Bragg and arrived at Elk River, Tenn., 
on the 3rd day of July. Continuous rains had raised the 
stream out of its banks, and it was swift and deep. Bragg had 
destroyed all bridges in his wake and we were forced to wade 
the stream. This was accomplished by stretching a two-inch 
cable from bank to bank and fastening it to trees on each bank. 

Cartridge boxes were taken off and fastened to the bay- 
onets to keep from getting wet. Into the water they went — 
the whole division, excepting artillery and wagons, crossing in 
this manner. Upon reaching the south bank, we went into 
camp and built large fires to dry our clothing which had be- 
come soaking wet. Camp was soon established, clothing dried, 
supper eaten and soon the regiment was asleep. 

About 3 o'clock in the morning a courier rode up with the 
information that Mead had whipped Lee at Gettysburg. It 
being the Fourth of July all of the batteries turned out to fire 
a salute, both for the victory and the great National day. 

From that time there was no rest or sleep until night. The 
boys began to celebrate in good Yankee style. Some one had 
a copy of the Declaration of Independence with him and it had 
to be read. The orators in the brigade "broke loose" and bom- 
barded the camp with their eloquence. As we were to march 
the next day the regiment retired early in order' to get a good 
night's rest, but this was not to be, as about midnight another 
courier rode into camp announcing that Pemberton had sur- 



rendered to Grant at Vicksburg. The artillery "cut loose," but 
the men were tired and remained in their quarters, and after 
firing the regulation salute the camp quieted down. We how- 
ever, remained in this camp until July 18th, when we marched 
eight miles, going into camp near Winchester, Tenn. 

August 1 1 we had Grand Review by Generals Rosecrans 
and Brannon, the latter commanding the division. As the 
division up to this time had not been in any severe engagements, 
it was of course the largest division in the Army of the Cum- 
berland, numbering 10,000 men. In the evening General Bran- 
non held a reception in honor of General Rosecrans and staff. 
It was largely attended, not only by all the officers of our divi- 
sion but from other divisions in the Corps. On the 12th we 
were paid off and on August 16th broke camp and marched 
five miles and went into camp on the 17th ; marched three miles 
on the 18th ; six miles and camped on the Cumberland Moun- 
tains, on the 19th ; marched twelve miles, camping at the base 
of the mountains ; on the 22nd marched five miles, camping in 
Swedon's Cove, near Battle Creek, being here until August 31st, 
when we broke camp and marched to the Tennessee River, 
near Bridgeport. Bragg had burned the bridge so we were 
obliged to build boats and rafts. The men used the rafts for 
themselves, wagons and artillery, making horses and mules 
swim the river. Some of the boys, however, swam across, 
which was a feat to accomplish, as the river was high, swift 
and very wide at this point. While holding a mule, which be- 
came fractious Henry Winkler, Company E. was struck on 
the head by the mule, dragged overboard and drowned. 



212 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



September 3rd left camp, marched seven miles, camping in 
the valley. September 4th we camped at Nick-a-Jack Cave. 
This was a saltpetre cave which furnished the Rebels saltpetre 
for manufacture of powder. Our forces destroyed it. Many 
of the boys had a curiosity to explore the cave. 

September 5th a number of Company D, entered the cave, 
near the mouth of which was a chasm and a single plank laid 
across. The chasm was about ten feet wide and thirty feet 
deep. While they were going in some were coming out. Sam- 
uel Mcllvaine, Company D, stepped to one side to allow an- 
other to pass him, but missed his footing and fell to the bottom, 
sustaining internal injuries which caused his death on the 8th 
of September. 

From Shell Mound on September 5th we marched five 
miles ; on the 6th eight miles, moved across Raccoon Mountain 
in the direction of Trenton, Georgia, which place we passed 
on the 10th, marching thirteen miles and camped in Lookout 
Valley. On the 1 ith we marched thirteen miles to the top of 
Lookout Range, at Sand Mountain, and camped in the valley 
in the direction of Lafayette, Ga. Here were two or three 
divisions' teams hitched up and all ready to move. Negley had 
.been out to Bailey's Cross Roads, had been forced to fall back, 
as the enemy seemed too strong in his front. Our brigade went 
out beyond the cross roads but no enemy was to be found. From 
here we moved eastward ; small bodies of the enemy were con- 
tinually harassing our flanks. A dash was made by Rebel cav- 
alry on the 17th and some of the Thirty-fifth Ohio reported 
captured, and had it not been for the Eighth Kansas coming 
up just in time the train would have suffered. A battle was 



imminent. General Rosecrans had not been certain of the 
enemy's movement, and scattered his army so that his wings 
were forty miles apart, the left under Crittenden, covering 
Chattanooga, which the enemy had evacuated and we had taken 
possession on the right under McCook, "in the air," as it were 
in the direction of Rome, while Thomas filled up the center. 
The effort now was to concentrate all at once on the left. 
Bragg, after having abandoned Chattanooga, had been rein- 
forced and began a move for its possession. On the 18th our 
movement to the left was very short, but at dark we again took 
the road and marched all night ; the troops in our front had 
built fires along the way cut of rails to warm by and our route 
was made plain by them. The enemy, perhaps, lulled into a 
feeling of security that there were no movements and the fires 
were in our camps. Our progress was slow and daylight, 
September 19, 1863, found us on the celebrated battlefield of 
Cickamauga. An effort was made to get a bite of breakfast 
but before it could be done the assembly sounded and we "fell 
in," there was important work ahead of us — the opening of 
the Battle of Chickamauga. 

It would not be out of place here to give a roster of our 
army preparatory to starting on the Chickamauga Campaign. 
Very few of the soldiers knew the various regiments and bat- 
teries that constituted that magnificent Army of the Cumber- 
land, and as it is an historical record, it should be in possession 
of every member of the regiment, for future reference. Be- 
sides it will revive memories, and carry the mind back to the 
"happy days of soldiering." 



Organization of Troops in the Department of the Cumberland Commanded by 
Major General W. S. Rosecrans, July 31, 1863 



General Headquarters. 
10th Ohio Infantry, Col. Joseph W. Burke 
1st Battalion Ohio Sharpshooters, Capt. Gersham M. Barlow 

FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS 
Major General George H. Thomas 

Escort 

Company L, 1st Ohio Cavalry, Capt. John D. Barker 

Provost Guard 
9th Michigan Infantry, Col. John G. Parkhurst 

FIRST DIVISION 

Brigadier General John H. King 

First Brigade 

Colonel Benjamin F. Seribner 
38th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Daniel F. Griffin 
2nd Ohio, Col. Anson G. McCook 
33rd Ohio, Col. Oscar F. Moore 
94th Ohio, Major Rue P. Hutchine 
10th Wisconsin, Lieut. Col. John H. Ely 
Battery A, 1st Michigan Artillery, Lieut. Almerich W. Wilbar 

Second Brigade 
Brigadier General John C. Starkweather 
24th Illinois, Col. Geza Miholotzy 
79th Pennsylvania, "Col. Henry A. Hambright 

1st Wisconsin, Lieut. Col. George B. Bingham 
21st Wisconsin, Lieut. Col. Harrison C. Hobart 
4th Indiana Battery, Lieut. David Flansbnry 



Third Brigade (Regulars) 

Major Samuel K. Dawson 

15th U. S., 1st Battalion, Capt. Henry Ketelas 

16th U. S„ 1st Battalion, Capt. Robert B. A. Crofton 

18th TJ. S„ 1st Battalion, Capt. George W. Swift 

18th TJ. S., 2nd Battalion, Capt. Henry Haymond 

19th TJ. S., 1st Battalion, Capt. Edmund L. Smith 

Battery H, 5th TJ. S. Artillery, Lieut. Francis 1 L. Gunther 

SECOND DIVISION 

Major General James S. Negley 

First Brigade 
Brigadier General John Beatty 
104th Illinois, Col. Absalom B. Moore 
42nd Indiana, Lieut. Col. Wm. T. B. Mclntyre 
88th Indiana, Col. George Humphrey 
15th Kentucky, Col. Marion C. Taylor 
3rd Ohio, Col. Orris A. Lawson 
2nd Kentucky Battery, Ca,pt. John M. Hewitt 

Second Brigade 
Colonel Timothy R. Stanley 
19th Illinois, Lieut. Col. Alex. M. Raffen 
11th Michigan, Lieut. Col. Melvin Mudge 
18th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Charles H. Grosvnor 
69th Ohio, Col. Marshall F. Moore 
Battery M, 1st Ohio Artillery, Capt. Frederick Schultz 



214 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Third Brigade 

Colonel William Sirwell 

37th Indiana, Col. James S. Hull 

21.st Ohio, Col. James M. Neibling 

74th Ohio, Col. Josiah Gwin 

78th Pennsylvania, Lieut. Col. Archibald Blakely 

Battery G, 1st Ohio Artillery, Capt. Alex. Marshall 

THIRD DIVISION 

Brigadier General John M. Brannon 

First Brigade 
Colonel John M, Connell 

82nd Indiana, Lieut. Col. Henry Davis 
17th Ohio, Col. Durbin Ward 
31st Ohio, Lieut. Col. Frederick W. Lister 
38th Ohio, Col. Willirm A. Choate 
4th Michigan Battery, Capt. Josiah W. Church 

Second Brigade 

Brigadier General James B. Steedman 
10,th Indiana, Col. William B. Carroll 
74th Indiana, Col. Charles W. Chapman 
4th Kentucky, Col. John T. Croxton 
10th Kentucky, Col. William H. Hays 
14th Ohio, Col. George P. Bste 
Battery C, 1st Ohio Artillery, Capt. Daniel K. Southwick 

Third Brigade 

Colonel Ferdinand Vandeveer 
87th Indiana, Col. Newell Gleason 

2nd Minnesota, Major John B. Davis 

9th Ohio, Col. Gustav Kammerling 
35th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Henry V. N. Boynton 
Battery I, 4th TJ. S. Artillery, Lieut. Frank G. Smith 



FOURTH DIVISION 

Major General Joseph J. Reynolds 

First Brigade 
Colonel A. O. Miller 
92nd Illinois, Col. Smith D. Atkins 
98th Illinois, Col. John J. Funkhouser 
123rd Illinois, Lieut. Col. Jonathan Briggs 
17th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Henry Jordan 
72nd Indiana, Lieut. Col. Samuel C. Kirkpatrick 
18th Indiana Battery, Capt. Eli Lilly 

Second Brigade 

Colonel Milton S. Robinson 

68th Indiana, Lieut. Col. John S. Scobey 
75th Indiana, Lieut. Col. William O'Brien 

101st Indiana, Lieut. Ool. Thomas Doan 

105th Ohio, Major Georg-e T. Perkins 
19th Indiana Battery, Capt. Samuel J. Harris 

Third Brigade 

Brigadier General John B. Turchin 

18th Kentucky, Lieut. Col. Hubbard K. Milward 

11th Ohio, Col. Philander P. Lane 

36th Ohio, Col. William G. Jones 

89th Ohio, Col. Caleb H. Carleton 

92nd Ohio, Col. Benjamin D. Fearing 

21st Indiana Battery, Capt. William W. Andrew 

TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS 

Major General Alexander McD. McCook 

FIRST DIVISION 

Brigadier General Jefferson C. Davis 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



215 



First Brigade 
Colonel P. Sidney Post 
59th Illinois, Lieut. Col. Joshua C. Winter 
74th Illinois, Lieut. Col. James B. Kerr 
75th Illinois, Col. John E. Bennett 
22nd Indiana, Col. Michael Gooding 

Second Brigade 
Brigadier General. William P. Carlin 
21st Illinois, Col. John W. Alexander 
38th Illinois, Lieut. Col. Daniel H. Gilmer 
SI st Indiana, Capt. Nevil B. Boone 
101st Ohio, Col. Isaac M. Kirby 

Third Brigade 
Colonel Hans C. Heg 
25th Illinois, Lieut. Col. James S. McClelland 
35th Illinois', Lieut. Col. William P. Chandler 
Sth Kansas, Col. John A. Martin 
15th Wisconsin, Lieut. Col. Ole C. Johnson 

Artillery 
2nd Minnesota Battery, Lieut. Albert Woodberry 
5th Wisconsin Battery, Capt. Geo. Q. Gardner 
Sth Wisconsin Battery, Capt. Henry E. Stiles 

SECOND DIVISION 

Brigadier General Richard W. Johnson 

First Brigade 
Brigadier General August Willich 
S9th Illinois, Lieut. Col. Duncan J. Hall 
32nd Indiana, Lieut. Col. F. Erdelmeyer 
39th Indiana, Col. Thos. J. Harrison 
*15th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Prank As&en 
*49th Ohio, Major Sam F. Gray 



*On detached duty. 



Second Brigade 
Colonel Joseph B. Dodge 
34th Illinois', Col. Alexander P. Dysart 
79th Illinois, Col. Allen Buekner 
29th Indiana, Lieut. Col. David M. Dunn 
30th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Orin D. Hurd 
77th Pennsylvania, Col. Thomas E. Rose 

Third Brigade 
Colonel Philemon P. Baldwin 
6th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Hagernian Tripp 
Sth Kentucky, Col. William W, Berry 
1st Ohio. Lieut. Col. E. Bassett Longdon 
93rd Ohio, Major William Birch 

Artillery 
5th Indiana Battery, Lieut. Alfred Morrison 
Battery A, 1st Ohio, Capt. Wilbur F. Goodspeed 
20th Ohio Battery, Capt. Ed Grosskopfli 

THIRD DIVISION 

Major General Philip H. Sheridan 

First Brigade 
*Brigadier General William H. Lytle 
36th Illinois, Col. Silas Miller 
88th Illinois, Col. Francis T. Sherman 
21st Michigan, Col. William B. McCreery 
24th Wisconsin, Col. Charles H. Larrabee 
11th Indiana Battery, Capt. Arnold Sutermeister 

Second Brigade 
Colonel Bernard Liaboldt 
44th Illinois, Col. Wallace W. Barrett 
73rd Illinois, Lieut. Col. William A. Presson 
2nd Missouri, Major Arnold Beck 



*Killed at Chickamauga. 



2l6 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



15th Missouri, Col. Joseph Conrad 

Battery G, 1st Missouri, Lieut. Capt. Henry Hescock 

Third Brigade 
Colonel Luther P. Bradley 
22nd Illinois, Lieut. Col. Francis Swanwick 
27th Illinois, Col. Jonathan R. Miles 
42nd Illinois, Col. Nathan H. Walworth 
51st Illinois, Lieut. Col. Samuel B. Raymond 
Battery C, 1st Illinois Light Artillery 

TWENTY-FIRST ARMY CORPS 
Major General John M. Palmer 

FIRST DIVISION 

Brigadier General Thomas J. Wood 

First Brigade 
Colonel Frederick A. Bartleson 

100th Illinois, Major Charles M. Hammond 
58th Indiana, Major Joseph Moore 
13th Michigan, Col. Joshua B. Culver 
26th Ohio, Col. W. H. Young 

Second Brigade 

Brigadier General George D. Wagner 
loth Indiana, Col. Gustavus A. Wood 
40th Indiana, Major Henry Learning 
57th Indiana, Lieut. Col. George W. Leonard 
97th Ohio, Col. John A. I/ane 

Third Brigade 

Colonel Charles G. Harker 
3rd Kentucky, Col. Henry C. Dtinlap 
64th Ohio, Col. Alexander Mcllvaine 



65th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Horatio N. Whitbeck 
125th Ohio, Col. Emerson Opedyke 

Artillery 

Captain Cullen Brady 
8th Indiana Battery, Lieut. Jeremiah Voris 
10th Indiana Battery, Lieut. William A. Naylor 
6th Ohio Battery, Capt. Cullen Brady 

SECOND DIVISION 

Brigadier General Charles Cruft 

First Brigade 
Colonel Thomas D. Sedgwick 
31st Indiana, Col. John T. Smith 
1st Kentucky, Major Alva R. Hadlock 
2nd Kentucky, Lieut. Col. John R. Hurd 
90th Ohio, Col. Charles H. Rippey 

Second Brigade 

Colonel Aquilla Wiley 
9th Indiana, Lieut. Col. William P. LaSalle 
6th Kentucky, Col. George T. Shackelford 
41st Ohio, Lieut. Col. Robert L. Kimberly 
124th Ohio, Lieut. Col. James Pickans 

Third Brigade 

Colonel William Grose 
84th Illinois, Col. Louis H. Waters 
36th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Oliver H. P. Carey 
23rd Kentucky, Lieut. Col. James C. Foy 
6th Ohio, Col. Nicholas L. Anderson 
24th Ohio, Capt. George M. Bacon 

Artillery 

Captain William E. Standart 
Battery B, 1st Ohio, Capt. William E. Standart 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



217 



Battery P, 1st Ohio, Lieut. Giles J. Cockrell 
Battery H, 4th U. S., Lieut. Harry C. dishing 
Battery M, 4th U. S„ Lieut. Francis L. D. Russell 

Unattached 
110th Illinois, Battalion, Capt. E. Hibbard Topping 

THIRD DIVISION 

Brigadier General Horatio P. Van Cleve 

First Brigade 
Brigadier General Samuel Beatty 
79th Indiana, Col. Fred Kneffler 

9th Kentucky, Lieut. Col. Chester D. Bailey 
17th Kentucky, Col. Alexander M. Stant 
19th Ohio, Col. Charles P. Manderson 

Second Brigade 
Colonel George F. Dick 
44th Indiana, Capt. John H. Wilson 
SCth Indiana, Major Jacob C. Dick 
13th Ohio, Col. Dwight Jarvis, Jr. 
59th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Granville A. Prambes 

Third Brigade 

Colonel Sidney M. Barnes 
55th Indiana, Major John P. Duffey 
Sth Kentucky, Lieut. Col. James D. Mayhew 
21st Kentucky, Col. Samuel W. Price 
51st Ohio, Col. Richard W. McLain 
99th Ohio. Col. Peter T. Swaine 

Artillery 
Captain Lucius H. Drury 
7th Indiana Battery, Capt. George R. Swallow 
Battery B, Pennsylvania, Capt. Alason J. Stevens 
3rd Wisconsin Battery, Lieut. Cortland Livingston 



RESERVE CORPS 

Major General Gordon Granger 

FIRST DIVISION 

Brigadier General Walter C. Whittaker 

First Brigade 
Colonel Thomas E. Champion 
96th Illinois, Lieut. Col. Isaac L. Clark 
115th Illinois, Col. Jesse H. Moore 
84th Indiana, Major Andrew J. Neff 
40th Ohio, Col. Jacob E. Taylor 
18th Ohio Battery, Capt. Charles C. Aleshire 

Second Brigade 
Colonel William P. Reid 
78th Illinois, Major William L. Broadus 
98th Ohio, Lieut. Col. John S. Pierce 
113th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Darius B. Warner 
121st Ohio, Lieut. Col. Henry B. Banning 
Battery M, 1st Illinois Artillery, Lieut. George W. Spencer 

Third Brigade 
Colonel John Coburn 
33rd Indiana, Lieut. Col. James M. Henderson 
85th Indiana, Col. John P. Baird 
19th Michigan, Col. Henry C. Gilbert 
22nd Wisconsin, Col. William L. Utey 
9th Ohio Battery, Capt. Harrison B. York 

SECOND DIVISION 
Brigadier General James D. Morgan 

First Brigade 
Colonel Robert F. Smith 
10th Illinois, Col. John Tillton 
16th Illinois, Lieut. Col. James B. Cohill 



2l8 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



60th Illinois, Lieut. Col. George W. Evans 

10th Michigan, Col. Charles M. Lum 

14th Michigan, Col. Henry R. Mizner 

10th Wisconsin Battery, Capt. Yates V. Beebe 

Second Brigade 

Colonel Daniel McCook 

80th Illinois, Major Orlando Fountain 
85th Illinois, Col. Caleb .T. Dilworth 
86th Illinois, Capt. Joseph P. Thomas 
125th Illinois, Col. Oscar F. Harmon 
52nd Ohio, Lieut. Col. Charles W. Clancey 
Battery I, 2nd Illinois Artillery, Capt. Charles M. Barnett 

Third Brigade 
Colonel Charles C. Doolittle 

18th Michigan, Major John W. Homer 

22nd Michigan, Col. Heher LeFavour 
1st Middle Tennessee, Col. Alvan C. Gillem 
106th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Gustavus Tafel 
108th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Carlo Piepho 
Battery E, 1st Ohio Artillery, Lieut. Stephen W. Dorsey 

THIRD DIVISION 

Brigadier General Robert S. Granger 

First Brigade 

Colonel Sanders D. Bruce 

83rd Illinois, Col. Arthur A. Smith 
28th Kentucky, Col. William P. Boone 
102nd Ohio, Col. William Given 
13th Wisconsin, Lieut. Col. James F. Chapman 
Battery C, 2nd Illinois Artillery, Capt. James P. Flood 
Battery H, 2nd Illinois Artillery, Capt. Henry C. Whitteman 
1st Middle Tennessee Battery, Capt. Ephriam P. Abbott 



Second Brigade 

Brigadier General William T. Ward 

102nd Illinois, Col. Franklin C. Smith 
105th Illinois, Col. Daniel Dustin 
129th Illinois, Col. Henry Coal 

70th Indiana, Col. Benjamin Harrison 

79th Ohio, Col. Henry G. Kennett 
5th Michigan Battery, Capt. John J. Ely 

Detached Troops 

1st Missouri Cavalry, Company F, Capt. James Clifford 
4th Battalion Pioneer Brigade, Capt. Miller Kemper 
Signal Corps, Lieut. Washington W. Hopkins 

CAVALRY CORPS 

Major General David S. Stanley 

FIRST DIVISION 

Brigadier General Robert B. Mitchell 

First Brigade 

Colonel Archibald P. Campbell 

1st East Tennessee, Lieut. Col. James P. Brownlow 
2nd Michigan, Major John C. Godley 
9th Pennsylvania, Col. Thomas J. Jordan 

Second Brigade 
Colonel Edward M. McCook 

2nd East Tennessee, Col. Daniel M. Ray 

3rd East Tennessee, Col. W. C. Pickens 

2nd Indiana, Major James W. Stewart 

4th Indiana, Col. John A. Platter 

1st Wisconsin, Col. Oscar H. LaGrange 

Battery D, 1st Ohio Artillery, Lieut. Nathan M. Newell 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



219 



Third Brigade 
Colonel Louis D. Watkins 
4th Kentucky, Col. Wickliffe Cooper 
5th Kentucky, Lieut. Col. William T. Hoblitzell 
6th Kentucky, Major Louis A. Gratz 
7th Kentucky, Lieut. Ool. Thomas T. Vimont 

SECOND DIVISION 

Brigadier General George Crook 

First Brigade 
Colonel Robert H. G. Minty 
3rd Indiana, Lieut. Col. Robert Klien 
5th Iowa, Lieut. Col. Mathewson T. Patrick 
4th Michigan, Major Horace Gray 
1st Middle Tennessee, Col. William B. Stokes 
7th Pennsylvania, Lieut. Col. William B. Sipes 
4th United States, Capt. B. Mclntyre 

Second Brigade 
Colonel Eli Long 
2nd Kentucky, Col. Thomas P. Nichols 
1st Ohio, Col. Berutt B. Eggleston 
3rd Ohio, Lieut. Col. Charles B. Seidel 
4th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Oliver P. Robie 
10th Ohio, Col. Charles C. Smith 

Artillery 

Stokes' Illinois Battery, Capt. James H. Stokes 

UNATTACHED 

Pioneer Brigade 
1st Battalion, Capt. Charles J. Stewart v 
2nd Battalion, Capt. Correl Smith 
3rd Battalion, Capt. Robert Clements 
Bridges' Illinois Battery, Capt. Lyman Bridges 



Artillery 

13th Indiana Battery, Capt. Benjamin S. Nicklin 

Artillery Reserve 
Captain Warren P. Bdgarton 
12th Indiana Battery, Capt. James E. White 
20th Indiana Battery, Lieut. George P. Armstrong 

The foregoing shows the strength of the Army of the 
Cumberland. The report shows that while we were at Win- 
chester the army consisted of 4,886 officers and 76,438 men, 
making a total of 81,324 men ready for business. Those re- 
ported absent were either on detached duty or sick in hos- 
pitals and on furlough. If the whole army had 'been present 
for duty, and no absentees, it would have consisted of 131,636 
men — enough to have "eaten Bragg up" if they had a chance. 

On August 1, 1863, Rosecrans wrote Halleck a letter, 
setting forth the facts as to the condition of the army and 
evidently in reply to another "roast" from the war depart- 
ment, as follows : 

"Headquarters Department of the Cumberland. 

Winchester, Term., Aug. 1, 1863. 
"(Private) — General H. W. Halleck. — General: — I thank 
you for your note of the 24th and 25th ultimo, and for your 
support and confidence hitherto. 

"These letters relieve my mind from a growing appre- 
hension that the injustice, which I have experienced from the 
war department, was extending to you. But as my ambition 
is something like your own — to discharge my duty to God 



220 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



and our country — I say frankly, that whenever the government 
can replace me by a commander in whom they have more 
confidence, they ought to do so, and take the responsibility 
of the result. Meanwhile let me call your attention to the 
conditions of the problem before this army: 

"First: Our base at Louisville is 264 miles distant from 
our present position. 

"Second: We are 83 miles from our principal depot — 
Nashville. 

"Third: We must transport all our subsistence, our cloth- 
ing, camp and garrison equipage, wagons, animals, ammuni- 
tion, and most of our forage over this distance by rail. 

"Fourth : We have before us 60 or 70 miles of barren 
mountain country, destitute of forage and subsistence, traversed 
by a few difficult roads, over which to advance. 

"Fifth : We have to cross the difficult defile of the Ten- 
nessee, a river from 600 to 1000 yards wide, in the face of 
a powerful enemy, and maneuver or fight him from an in- 
trenched position, in a mountainous country with several lines 
of retreat; the nearest points of this position being from 26 
to 45 miles from our railroads, over mountains. 

"Sixth: To advance in the face of these obstacles is not 
the only, nor even the most important, problem. 

"We must so advance as never to recede. The citizens 
say (and not without justice) 'wdiip our armies, and then, 
when we no longer fear their return to power, we will show 
you that we are satisfied to be in the Union; but until you 
do that we are not safe from proscription.' 



"Seventh: Not only so, but this must be done in view 
of the possibility of Joe Johnston joining Bragg. 

"These are the conditions of the first problem. The pre- 
liminaries to its successful solution are: First, open the rail- 
road ; establish and provide for guarding depots at the near- 
est accessible points, and, secondly, to provide means of 
crossing the river and maintain communication over it. To 
these ends every effort is now being bent. Rest assured these 
things would have to be done by any commander, and I think 
we are doing them as rapidly as our means will admit. 

Very respectfully, 

W. S. Rosecrans, 
Major General." 

Morgan had started on his raid to Indiana and Ohio, and 
many of the boys expressed the wish that he would go from 
New Albany to Michigan City and press in every copperhead 
in the state. In relation to this General Thomas writes Gen- 
eral Rosecrans as follows : 

"Headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps. 

Decherd, Tenn., Aug I, 1863. 
"Brigadier General James A. Garfield, Chief of Staff. — 
General: — My chief of scouts, Dr. J. D. Hale, reports as fol- 
lows: 'Morgan's forces consisted of 7 regiments of 400 each. 
Breckenridge is now with Forrest or Wheeler. Morgan could 
not have crossed the river with over 2,000 men. The balance 
of his force was composed of Kentucky, Indiana or Ohio cop- 



HISTORY OF THE) TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



221 



perheads who enlisted for the trip. General Wheeler had not 
over 8,000 men when we advanced on Shelbyville, including 
Forrest's command. Bragg' s forces much overrated. He never 
had 30,000 infantry since the Stone River fight. When he 
evacuated Tullahoma he had 20,000 infantry and 6,000 or 
8,000 cavalry — not more. Rebel regiments seldom average 
300; batteries 50 to 80 men. Have 150 guns and if so, Mr. 
Lamon says they are neither at Chattanooga, nor have they 
been sent up the Tennessee Valley. They must have been 
taken south. They could not have sent over a division to 
Johnston, by all accounts. A great many of Morgan's men 
were, never mustered into the regular confederate service. 
Wheat crop in Tennessee Valley threatened to be much dam- 
aged by neglect. Colonel Wilder missed a figure when he 
burned the bridge at McMinnville.' 

Very respectfully, 

George H. Thomas, 
Major General U. S. A." 

The following correspondence shows that the government 
had another "attack of worms:" 

"War Department, Washington, Aug. 4, 1863. — Noon. 
"Major General Rosecrans — Army of the Cumberland. — 
Your forces must move without further delay. You will daily 
report the movements of each corps till you cross the Ten- 
nessee River. 

H. W. Halleck, 

General in Chief." 



"Headquarters Army of the Cumberland. 

Winchester, Term., Aug. 4, 1863. — 5 p. m. 

Major General H. W. Halleck — General in Chief: — Your 

dispatch ordering me to move forward without further delay, 

reporting daily the movement of each corps until I crossed 

the Tennessee River, is received. 

"As I have determined to cross the river as soon as 
practicable and have been making all preparations, and get- 
ting such information as may enable me to do so without be- 
ing driven back, like Hooker, I wish to know if your order is 
intended to take away my discretion as to time and manner 
of moving my troops ? 

W. S. Rosecrans, 

Major General." 

"War Department, Washington, Aug. 5, 1863. — 2 p. m. 
"Major General Rosecrans — Winchester, Tenn. — The 
order for the advance of your army, and that its movements 
be reported daily are peremptory. H. W. Halleck, 

General in Chief." 

The following settled the business : 

"Winchester, Tenn., Aug. 6, 1863 — 12:10 p. m. 

"Major General H. W. Halleck— General in Chief.— My 
arrangements for beginning a continuous movement will be 
completed and the execution begun by Monday next. We have 
information to show that crossing the Tennessee River between 
Bridgeport and Chattanooga is impracticable but not enough 
to show whether we had better cross above Chattanooga and 



222 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



strike Cleveland, or below Bridgeport and strike their rear. 
The preliminary movements of our troops for the two cases 
are very different. It is necessary to have our means of cross- 
ing the river completed and our supplies provided to cross 60 
miles of mountains, and sustain ourselves during the opera- 
tions of crossing and fighting, before we move. 

"To obey your order literally would be to put our troops 
into the mountains on narrow and difficult roads ; destitute of 
pasture and forage, short of water, where they would be able 
to maneuver as exigencies may demand, and would certainly 
cause ultimate delay and probably disaster. 

"If, therefore, the movement which I propose cannot be 
regarded as obedience to your order, I respectfully request 
a modification of it or be relieved from the command. 
W. S. Rosecrans, 

Major General Commanding." 

"War Department, Washington, Aug. 7, 1863 — 11 a. m. 

"Major General Rosecrans — Winchester. — I have com- 
municated to you the wishes of the government in plain and 
unequivocal terms. The objeot has been stated and you have 
been directed to lose no time in reaching it. The means you 
are to employ and the roads you are to follow are left to your 
own discretion. 

"If you wish to promptly carry out the wishes of the 



government you will not stop to discuss mere detail. In such 
matters I do not interfere. H. W. Halleck, 

General in Chief." 

"Winchester, Tenn., Aug. 7, 1863. 
"Major General H. W. Halleck — General in Chief: — Your 
dispatch received. I can only repeat the assurance given before 
the issue of the order. This army shall move with all the 
dispatch compatible with the successful execution of our work. 
We are pressing everything to bring up forage for our animals. 
The present rolling stock of the road will barely suffice to keep 
us day by day here, but I have bought 50 more freight cars 
which are arriving". Will advise you daily. 

W. S. Rosecrans, 

Major General." 

"Headquarters Department of the Cumberland. 

Winchester, Aug. 6, 1863. 
"Major General George H. Thomas: — The general com- 
manding directs that you report if your animals are shod and 
in readiness to move. Also the number of days' rations and 
forage on hand. He also directs that you have your command 
supplied with 10 days' rations and short forage, packed and 
ready for a move. Very respectfully, 

Frank S. Bond, 

Major and A. A. G." 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



223 



The army got into motion, headed for Chattanooga. Rose- 
crans wanted to succeed and knew the situation better than 
the authorities at Washington. 

The war department could have profited by the endorse- 
ment of Jeff Davis in a reply to the Confederate Secretary of 
War relative to conditions in East Tennessee. A move across 
the mountains was suggested. • Bragg opposed it on the grounds 
that Burnside could starve them out. The matter was referred 
to Davis, who replied as follows : 



"Richmond, Va., Aug. 10, 1863. 
"Secretary of War: — However desireable a movement may 
be, it is never safe to do more than suggest it to a commanding 
general, and it would be unwise to order its execution by one 
who foretold failure. j cff Dav ; s ,» 

There is a good deal of "horse sense" in the above state- 
ment, which seemed lacking at Washington in the case of the 
Army of the Cumberland. 




MAX GEN. JOSEPH J. REYNOLDS 

First Colonel 10th Indiana 

Infantry 




BRIG. GEN. JOHN M. BRANNAN 

Commanding 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps 

at Chickamauga 



CHAPTER IX 



Battle of Chickamauga 



BEFORE beginning an account of the battle, it would be 
well perhaps to note the causes which brought about the 
engagement. I quote from the report of the Indiana 
Chickamauga Commission appointed by Governor Mathews : 

"The battle proper began on the morning of September 19, 
1863. The Battle of Chickamauga was ordered by General 
Bragg. General Rosecrans was not hunting a battle at that 
time. He was seking safety for his army in Chattanooga, the 
objective point of his campaign. 

"He had embraced the delusion that his enemy was fleeing 
from him in confusion and dismay, and had awakened to find 
that enemy powerfully re-enforced, threatening not only the 
widely separated corps of his army, but massed in position to 
cross his line of march to Chattanooga, crush his left wing 
and force his army back into the mountain passes out of which 
it was struggling — a result which meant utter destruction. 

"It is perhaps overstating it to say that General Rosecrans 
was awake to all of this. On the night of the 17th, at his 
headquarters at Lee's Mill, near Crawfish Springs, he expressed 
utter disbelief in the presence of Bragg's army in force on his 
left, within striking distance. Be that as it may, we know that 
he was at that moment engaged in a life and death struggle 



to get his army corps within supporting distance and inter- 
posed between his enemy and Chattanooga. 

"Not to exceed 60,000 men crossed the Tennessee under 
the command of General Rosecrans. Of these, at least 6,000 
were put on guard and garrison duty, leaving for service 54,000 
men, which includes all detailed men serving in the field. At 
that, Bragg's army was as follows : 

Army of the Tennessee 45,000 

Buckner's force 10,000 

Force sent by Johnston to him — 2 divisions. . . 10,000 
And later, Gregg and McNair's Brigades. . . . 3,000 
Longstreet started from Virginia with 18,000 

Making an aggregate of 86,000 

"But it is said that two of Buckner's Brigades were lost 
to the army, and his two cavalry brigades were away, and 
that four of Longstreet's Brigade and all of his artillery failed 
to reach the field in time to participate in the battle. If we 
estimate the brigades at 2,000 each, it will be liberal. Gregg's 
and McNair's are estimated at 3,000. Together that would 
be 8 brigades out, 16,000 men, leaving 70,000 men for duty, 



226 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



which is probably the correct number, rather below than above. 
"To be exact, the rosters show that there were concen- 
trated at Chickamauga in the Union Army, 121 infantry regi- 
ments, 6 mounted infantry, and 18 cavalry, a total of 145 regi- 
ments ; battalions 7 infantry, 1 cavalry; 8 in all; companies of 
cavalry 1, batteries 33, sections 1. Grand total — organizations 
188, guns 196. 

"The Confederate Army had concentrated at Chicka- 
mauga : 

Regiments of infantry 149 

Mounted rifles 2 

Cavalry 89 

Total regiments 190 

Battalions infantry 22 

Battalions cavalry 5 

Battalions artillery 1 

Total battalions 28 

Detachments cavalry 2 

Companies cavalry 8 

Total cavalry 10 

Batteries 38 

Sections 3 

Grand total 269 

Guns 168 

"When night came, on the 17th, the Union Army was at 
Daugherty's Gap, which was occupied by R. B. Mitchell's 
cavalry. All mountain passes were guarded by cavalry and 
infantry, while supply trains were on the mountain tops en- 



route for Chattanooga. The three Union corps were practically 
united at McLemore's Cove, presenting a strong front on 
the Chickamauga : Sheridan, the right wing at Steven's 
Gap ; Davis at Dug Gap ; R. W. Johnson at Cattlett's Gap ; 
Brannan and Reynolds in line extending from Pond Spring to 
Gower's Ford'; Baird at Bird's Mill; Negley at Owen's Ford; 
Palmer on right of Negley; Van Cleve's Division near Craw- 
fish Springs, and T. J. Wood's Brigade behind barricade at 
Lee & Gordon's Mill. Granger, with headquarters at Rossville, 
held Rossville Gap, with Whittaker and J. G. Mitchell, of 
Steadman's Division, and Dan McCook, of Morgan's ; Wag- 
ner, of Wood's Division, garrisoned Chattanooga. In front of 
Granger and the left of Crittenden were Minty's Cavalry 
Brigade, and Wilder'? Brigade of Mounted Infantry; Minty 
in the vicinity of Reed's Bridge and Wilder near Alexander's 
Bridge. 

"The Confederate army was distributed: Wheeler at Mc- 
Lemore's Cove ; Hill's Corps stood opposite Lafayette ; Polk's, 
Buckner's and Walker's extended in the order named north- 
east from near Rock Spring Church, to a point southeast of 
Alexander's Bridge, with Forrest's Cavalry on their right front. 
On the extreme right, around Catoose Station and Ringgold, 
were the brigades of R. B. Johnson, of Stewart's Division, 
Buckner's Corps, of Tennessee; Robertson and Benning, of 
Hood's Division of the Army of the Tennessee; Gregg, of 
Walker's and McNair, of French's Division of Johnson's 
army, and Bledsoe's and Culpepper's battteries. These formed 
an emergency division under B. R. Johnson. Bragg's head- 
quarters were at Leet's Tan Yard. With this situation, on the 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



227 



night of the 17th, Bragg issued the following order for battle 
on the 1 8th : 

"First: Johnson's column (Hood's) on crossing at or near 
Reed's Bridge, will turn to the left by most practicable route 
and sweep up to Chickamauga towards Lee & Gordon's Mill. 

"Second: Walker, crossing at Alexander's Bridge, will 
unite in this move and push vigorously on the enemy's flank 
and rear, in the same direction. 

"Third: Buckner, crossing at Thedford's Ford, will join 
in the movement to the left and push the enemy up stream from 
Polk's Ford at Lee & Gordon's Mill. 

"Fourth : Polk will press his forces to the front of Lee & 
Gordon's Mill and if met by too much resistance to cross will 
bear to the right and cross at Dalton's Ford or Thedford's, as 
may be necessary, and join in the attack wherever the enemy 
may be. 

"Fifth : Hill will cover our left flank from an advance of 
the enemy from the cove, and by pressing the cavalry in his 
front, ascertain if the enemy is re-enforcing at Lee & Gordon's 
Mill, in which event he will attack them in flank. 

"Sixth: Wheeler's Cavalry will hold the gaps in Pigeon 
Mountain and cover our rear and left and bring up stragglers. 

"Eighth: The above movements will be executed with the 
utmost promptness, vigor and persistence. 

By command of 

General Bragg. 
George Wrn. Brent, Adjutant General." 



"The order showed the most accurate knowledge of the 
situation of the left wing of the Union Army on the morning 
of the 1 8th. 

"On the 1 8th the movement began at sunrise, Miuty and 
Wilder fighting desperately until overpowered by overwhelm- 
ing numbers. Wilder fought until 5 p. 111., when he was 
flanked by an infantry force and withdrew toward Lee & 
Gordon's Mill. The final repulse of the Confederates being 
at 9 o'clock p. m. 

September 19, 1863. 

"Early on the 19th General Thomas reached the McDon- 
ald House, on the LaFayette road, with Baird's, Brannan's 
and Reynold's Divisions, followed in succession by Johnson's, 
Palmer's, Van Cleve's and that J. C. Davis' Divisions. Gen- 
eral T. J. Wood was posted at Lee & Gordon's Mill and until 
2 p. m. Sheridan was in reserve at Crawfish Springs. Negley 
was guarding the west bank of the Chickamauga below Glass' 
Mill. Gordon Granger with Mitchell and Whittaker of Stead- 
man's Division and Dan McCook, was about four miles nortn 
of the battle field, near McAfee's Church, guarding the Chat- 
tanooga and Ringgold road. Mitchell and Crook's Cavalry 
were at the fords on the Upper Chickamauga. 

We had marched all night on the night of the 18th from 
Pond Spring by way of Crawfish Springs, north to the Kelley 
House on the LaFayette and Rossville road, reaching this 
place about daylight. On arriving at the Kelley House, as 
General Brannan reports, he received orders from General 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Thomas, "to capture if possible a rebel force represented by 
Colonel Dan McCook to be a brigade cut off on the west side 
of Chickamauga Creek, failing in this to drive it across the 
creek." 

"In obedience to these orders, General Brannan without 
waiting for his men to get their breakfast, sent forward the 
Second. Brigade (Croxton) of his division southeastward 
towards Reed's Bridge road to strike the left of the supposed 
lost Confederate Brigade. This Brigade reached the vicinity 
of Jay's Mill about 7 130 a. m., where it found the Confed- 
erates for' which it was in search, but instead of a single 
brigade, cut off and wandering about, there were two divisions 
in, as it proved, most excellent fighting condition, and at once 
the battle of September 19th at Chickamauga began." 

Statement of Major Joe H. VanNatta, Tenth Indiana 
Infantry. 

"About 6 o'clock a. m. we stopped to get breakfast, and 
when the coffee commenced to boil the bugle sounded the as- 
sembly, and an orderly come from Colonel Croxton with or- 
ders for Major VanNatta to report at his headquarters. He 
reported, and Croxton said to him, 'I am going to give you 
two companies from the Fourth Kentucky and two companies 
from the Tenth Indiana and bring on the engagement.' He 
formed the companies in skirmish line and told them to drop 
knapsacks off. We started in and drove the enemy a half to 
three-quarters of a mile. Opened fire on Forrest's Cavalry. 



They galloped away and came back with a force of cavalry 
and started after us. We fell back without firing, halting 
within 200 yards of the brigade line. Our brigade raised up 
and gave them a volley, killing and wounding a great many — 
the ground being strewn with sabers, canteens, etc. They fell 
back and we followed them back to the same ground we for- 
merly occupied. They then brought up two pieces of artillery, 
and we soon shut them up. I ordered some men in the tree 
tops with orders to shoot an)' man who came near the artillery. 
Johnny Simpson (aide to Croxton) was sent to me with in- 
formation that Croxton would support me with the brigade. 
I stated to Simpson that the rebels were forming a line of 
battle on my right, 'don't you see them?' Go and tell Croxton 
they are forming a heavy line on his right. 

"Croxton then changed his line facing to southwest. 
Croxton said the orders were to bring on an engagement. I 
said I did not object to carrying out the orders, but the ad- 
visability of doing it. The battle was on, and I can say with- 
out fear of contradiction that the Tenth Indiana fired the first 
shot in battle of Chickamauga September 19, 1863." 

The foregoing statement of Major Van Natta must be 
given full credence as he was in command of the skirmishers 
and brought on the engagement and was in a better position 
to know than anyone else. Captain Boynton, of the Third 
Brigade, tried to steal all the glory from the other two brigades 
in the division, and being chairman of the Chickamauga Com- 
mission succeeded to a great extent in robbing the First and 
Second Brigades of the honors won on that field. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



229 



Account of the Battle by Corporal W. H. WilFy, 
Company A. 

"Forrest's Cavalry dismounted, was first met by Croxton's 
Brigade which was advancing in line, the front being the 
Seventy-Fourth Indiana, Colonel Chapman on the right ; the 
Fourth Kentucky, Colonel Hunt, on the left; and the Tenth In- 
diana, Colonel William B. Carroll, in the center; preceded by 
skirmishers, (Company C, Captain James H. Boyl, and Com- 
pany H, Captain John C. Boswell, Tenth Indiana), commanded 
by Major Job H. Van Natta, Tenth Indiana. The Fourteenth 
Ohio and Tenth Kentucky were in reserve. 

"Advancing but a short distance in line of battle the 
skirmishers came in contact with the enemy's pickets. When 
the firing commenced, at first a few scattering shots, then faster 
and faster until our entire skirmish line seemed to be engaged. 
It was very evident that the enemy's pickets were not idle for 
many of their bullets passed over our heads. 

"This state of affairs continued perhaps fifteen or twenty 
minutes, the line of battle coming to a halt in the meantime. 
All at once we heard the 'rebel yell' right in our front which 
showed us too plainty that there was to be something more than 
picket fighting. Soon our skirmishers were coming back on the 
run, pursued by a regiment of cavalry. It was none of your 
'2 :20 county fair concerns.' The boys on that skirmish line 
never knew before that time how fast they could run. Here 
they come by strides not to be beaten by mortal man. The 
enemy's cavalry was a close second with drawn sabers, and 
urging their horses to their utmost speed and all the time yell- | 



ing like demons. We didn't dare fire as we would in all prob- 
ability have killed more of our own men than of the enemy. 
On they came until our skirmishers pass through our line of 
battle. The enemy seemed not to have noticed our line in 
their mad pursuit but came dashing up to within a short dis- 
tance of us, when we received orders to fire — and such a volley. 
Three regiments empty their guns right in their faces, and that 
was the last of that cavalry charge. Company A, Captain T. A. 
Cobb, was then ordered forward on the skirmish line. Quite 
a number of dead men, and many dead and crippled horses 
was the result of that volley. After an advance of about 200 
yards when they came in contact with the enemy's skirmishers, 
the firing commenced pretty much as at first, but no cavalry 
this time. Instead, they run out a section of a battery (two 
guns) about 100 yards in our front which began to shell us. 
The}' did little harm, as their range was bad, the shells passing 
considerable distance above our heads. The boys made it hot 
for their gunners for a little while as they drew the fire from 
our entire skirmish line. We soon discovered that the enemy's 
infantry was advancing on our right in line of battle, at almost 
right angles with our line. Our line of battle is changed al- 
most pointing south, which caused many of the skirmishers to 
pass to the left and rear of the regiment. In a short time our 
whole line is hotly engaged with the enemy who are not more 
than 75 to 100 yards distant and still advancing. The con- 
tending forces remained in this position, firing into each 
other's ranks for quite a while. The slaughter was terrific on 
both sides. About this time (10 a. m.) Lieutenant Martin T. 



230 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Jones and Corporal John H. Van Cleve, of Company A, were 
killed and some fifteen wounded in the space of not more than 
fifteen minutes. At this point Colonel William B. Carroll, of 
the Tenth, fell mortally wounded. The whole regiment suf- 
fered, as one member said 120 men were killed and wounded 
in that many minutes. It was evident that this state of affairs 
could not long continue, one side or the other would have to 
give way and that soon. Finally, Croxton seeing he was being 
outflanked on both flanks, gave orders to fall back. We passed 
back over the line in our rear, the enemy following with a yell 
thinking our rout complete. As soon as we passed over our 
rear line, which is lying on the ground, they up and at them, 
compelling them to turn and fall back. By the time our second 
line is repulsed the three regiments have rallied and are ready 
for them again. In this same manner this same ground was 
fought over by our brigade five times in less than two hours. 
Yanderveer's Brigade moved up on our left and engaged them 
hotly to the north of us. The Confederate troops with which 
we had been engaged up to this time was Forrest's Cavalry, 
a part of them dismounted, Wilson's and Ector's brigades of 
infantry of Walker's Division. 

About 1 1 o'clock in the forenoon our brigade was relieved 
by Starkweather's, when we passed to the rear for more am- 
munition. Baird's and Brannan's Divisions having been united 
their forces drove the enemy from their front. These two di- 
visions were ordered to take their positions commanding the 
road from McDonald's (near Kelley) to Reed's Bridge, and 
hold it to the last extremity. This was about 2 o'clock p. m. 



In about an hour from this time Reynold's Division was 
furiously assailed on the right. Brannan was ordered to his 
support and Croxton's Brigade arrived just in time to prevent 
the enemy from turning his right and getting in his rear. This 
was our last fighting for that day, and our division was or- 
dered to the west of the State Road (LaFayette and Chatta- 
nooga) for the night. The position we occupied was partly 
on the slope of Snodgrass Hill, in an open field extending 
south to the Dyer house. The night was remarkably quiet, 
except just after dark when the enemy made an assault on a 
portion of our front line, which was soon repulsed. There 
was scarcely any fighting during the night. The day had been 
extremely hot, but the night was clear and frosty, water froze 
in our canteens, but, notwithstanding that and the fact that 
we were allowed no fires, most of the boys slept quite sound, 
being very tired and not having slept any the night before. 

On the morning of the 20th (Sunday) there was a heavy 
fog hanging over the surrounding country. It seemed as if 
all the smoke of the battle of the previous clay had gathered 
in that vicinity. 

After being allowed plenty of time to make coffee and 
eat breakfast the order was given to "fall in." Our division 
moved to the front about a quarter of a mile into a strip of 
woods, lying between the open ground, where we had slept 
during the night and the Lafayette and Chattanooga road. 
Across the road and extending for some distance to both right 
and left was an open field, perhaps forty rods wide. Still fur- 
ther to the right and south was the Poe house, and beyond 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



231 



that the Brotherton farm. Our line was formed along a ridge 
sloping to the east and beyond the field in our front. In our 
rear the slope extended back through the woods and to the 
field where we had spent the night before. The front line of 
our brigade consisted of the Seventy-fourth Indiana on our 
left and the Tenth Indiana on the right, and Southwick's Bat- 
tery (C) First Ohio Light Artillery, commanded by Lieutenant 
M. B. Gary, on the right of the Tenth Indiana. Our second 
line consisted of the Tenth Kentucky in rear of the Tenth In- 
diana, and the Fourteenth Ohio to the right of the Fourth 
Kentucky. Council's Brigade (First) was still further on our 
right. The Thirty-first Ohio in front of and overlapping the 
Fourteenth Ohio. Yanderveer's Brigade (Third) was held 
as reserves in the rear. To the right of Connell's Brigade 
was stationed Wood's Division of Crittenden's Corps (Twenty- 
first), and to the left of our brigade was Reynolds' Division 
of Thomas' Fourteenth Corps. 

Soon after forming lines as above we were ordered to 
construct such breastworks as we were able, of material at 
hand. We had no spades, shovels or picks to work with, but 
it was not long until we had quite a line of works made of 
logs, chunks, rails and whatever was loose. When completed 
these works did not look very formidable, but they served to 
stop many a Rebel bullet that might have found a stopping 
place in some brave boy's head. 

Company A, Captain T. A. Cobb, was ordered to support 
the battery just on our right. They were ordered to lie down 
under the muzzles of the guns and not fire until the battery 



was charged by the enemy. The lines were now formed and 
everything was ready for the assault of the Rebel columns, 
which we knew would come sooner or later. 

Not a shot had been fired up to this time. The silence 
was oppressive. Every man felt that the work of the day be- 
fore, was mere child's play to what was to be today. It must 
have been 10 o'clock when away to our left we hear the report 
of a single musket. Then another, two, three, half a dozen, 
and it deepens into a continual roar. Soon the artillery opens 
on both sides. Their shells explode far to the rear, which 
shows their range is bad. But this is soon corrected, as is 
shown by their being but a short interval from the report of 
the gun to the explosion of the shell. This does not last long. 
There is a lull of a few seconds and then the Rebel yell. The 
artillery opens again but not with shell this time. The report 
of the guns show that they are using grape and cannister. We 
know but too well what this means — they are trying to turn 
our left. That once accomplished and the day is lost to us. 
Baird's Division is on our extreme left and he was being sorely 
pressed. He sent to General Thomas for reinforcements. A^an- 
derveer's Brigade, lying in our rear, is called into action. He 
was ordered to report to Baird, but he never obeyed the order. 
As he swung his men in line at the southwest corner of Kelly's 
field, he was met by victorious Rebels who had already passed 
Baird's left and were in his rear. No time to report to Baird. 
No time to wait for orders. The four grand old regiments, 
the Ninth and Thirty-fifth Ohio, Second Minnesota and Eighty- 
seventh Indiana, are equal to the occasion. They never halt. 



232 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



At them they went with a shout, beside which the Rebel yell 
dwindles into insignificance in comparison with it. On they 
went with an irresistible force that no Rebel troops can stand. 
They drive them back beyond Baird's left and enable him to 
straighten out his line again. But the battle is not over, even 
in this part of the field. There is only a partial cessation of the 
firing. The enemy are evidently preparing to renew the assault. 
They bring up fresh troops and again the Rebel yell is heard. 
But they do not swing around Baird's left this time. Vande- 
veer's four regiments are still there. The firing is again ter- 
rific from both sides. The Rebels are not making much head- 
way this time and are soon compelled to retire. 

Fresh troops are again hurled against our left, only to 
retire shattered and broken. It is now evident that the com- 
manders of the Rebel forces are making a serious mistake. 
They are not making a concerted attack on our line at once, 
but seem to be striking with not more than a brigade or two 
at a time. Had they hurled their whole right wing against 
our left, the consequences to us would have been fearful to 
contemplate. 

Finally there is almost a total cessation of firing from both 
sides, which shows the enemy to have given up the idea of turn- 
ing our left or are preparing to strike our lines at some other 
point. 

It now seemed as if the enemy had abandoned the idea of 
trying to turn our left, which had been their object up to this 
time. Bragg ascribes their failure to attain that point to the 
fact that Polk, who was in command of the Rebel right, re- 



fused to obey his (Bragg's) orders; that his orders were to 
strike our left with his whole force at 6 o'clock in the morn- 
ing, but instead of doing that he waited until near ten, thus 
giving our forces ample time to construct their rude fortifi- 
cations and prepare to the more effectually repel their assault 
when it was made, and also instead of striking with his whole 
force as ordered, he only sent in a brigade or two or perhaps 
a division at a time which permitted Rosecrans to concentrate 
his forces the more effectually against him. 

It seemed as if the enemy had now changed their plan and 
were feeling for a weak place in our lines. Their next as- 
sault sounded much closer to us than at first. It seemed to 
commence about the same way as the other. After trying two 
or three times to charge our lines, only to meet the same fate, 
the attempt was given up at that point. Nearer and nearer the 
tide of battle rolls to us. First a few scattering shots, then 
the deafening roar and still louder belching double shotted can- 
non as they mow wide swaths with grape and cannister through 
the charging, yelling, Rebel lines. Soon the answering yell 
comes from our side and we know that the enemy have been 
driven back again with fearful slaughter. Still further south 
the battle rolls. This time it is the left of Reynolds' Division 
that receives the shock. It is only a repetition of former 
charges. The deafening roar, the Rebel yell, a sheet of flame 
leaps from the line of hastily constructed works. The enemy's 
line seems to melt away and the ground is thickly strewn with 
dead and dying. Rosecrans seeing that Reynolds' lines are 
sorely pressed orders Wood, who is on his right to close up on 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



-233 



him (Reynolds) and support him, forgetting that our division 
(Brannon's) is between the two. 

Wood, still smarting under a reprimand received from 
Rosecrans a short time before for refusing to blindly obey an 
order, pulls his whole division out of line, marches in rear of 
Brannon and partly to rear of Reynolds, thus leaving a gap 
in our lines the width of a whole division. The blind obedi- 
ence of an order on the part of Wood lost the Battle of Chick- 
amauga to us. 

Quiet again reigns in our front. A sergeant of the battery 
which Company A was supporting mounts one o fthe guns and 
looking over our breastworks and down the slope into the 
woods beyond sees a large force of the enemy marching by 
the left flank to our right. In an instant these guns are charged 
with shell and open a terrific roar right over us. The Rebels 
change their course by the right flank and start for our lines. 
It is our turn now, on they come firing and yelling at every 
step. The two regiments composing the front line of our bri- 
gade have orders not to fire until they come within about seven- 
ty yard's of our front. On they come, it seems with an irrestible 
force. The fatal line is passed and a sheet of flame the width 
of these two regiments is poured right in their faces. They are 
too close now for the battery to use shell to any advantage. 
Their guns are double charged with grape and cannister. No 
troops can long withstand such a fire. Again they give way 
as on former attempts and fall back out of range of our guns. 
But soon they come again only to meet the same fate as before, 
and they again fall back. All this time the terrible gap in our 



lines by the withdrawal of Wood's Division is still open. They 
next charge to our right and they find what they have been 
hunting for — a weak place in our lines. In an instant, it seems 
the whole left wing of the Rebel army, under the command of 
Longstreet is pouring through that gap. The sound of battle 
on our left, terrible as it had been, dwindles into insignificance 
in comparison to the pandemonium that has broken loose on 'our 
right. Connell's Brigade on our right soon gives away. The 
Thirty-first Ohio on our immediate right stand against this 
mighty storm, but for a moment, and is swept away. We are 
now left exposed with the battery we are supporting on the 
extreme right, with it seems the whole Southern Confederacy 
pouring through our right and rear. The guns of the battery 
are turned to the right to enfilade the Rebel lines with grape 
and cannister as they pass through the line of battle, but a 
short distance to our right, but on they go. We can see them 
swing around in our rear. Another line is forming in the rear 
of their front line and fronting our battery, they are coming 
for Southwick's guns. There are Rebels in our front and in 
our rear, a few minutes more it will be over with us and we 
will all start for Andersonville — not yet. Lieut. Colonel Marsh 
B. Taylor, commanding the Tenth Indiana, in that shrill, piping 
voice, gives the command "About face, fix bayonets, to the left 
oblique, charge !" and away we go at those fellows in our rear 
and not only check them but drive them back for a time. Lieu- 
tenant Gary seeing that his only chance for escape asks Captain 
Cobb to assist his men in running his guns off by hand, as the 
Rebel line on our right is so close that it would be impossible 



234 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



to bring up the limber. We take hold of the. guns and run five 
of them back down the slope to where the caissons and limbers 
are so that they can hitch what few horses they have left to 
them and they are saved. We dismount the other gun, take 
out the linch pins and throw them away. After helping save 
the battery the most of Company A rejoined the regiment, 
where they were engaged with the enemy in the rear of and at 
a right angle with our former position. 

They are formed along the edge of a field and are firing 
at a rebel line coming down across the field to the north. Soon 
the command is given to retreat and the Tenth and Seventy- 
fourth Indiana, under command of Colonel Taylor, fall back 
and form on the right of Reynolds at the southwest corner of 
Kelley's field, Colonel Croxton having been wounded, the rest 
of the brigade in command of Colonel Hays of the Tenth 
Kentucky, joined the rest of the division on Snodgrass Hill. 

We were not engaged again during the day. At this time 
the firing had almost ceased and to all appearances the battle 
was over. Rosecrans, McCook (Twentieth Corps) and Crit- 
tenden had fled to Chattanooga, leaving the army and their com- 
mands to their fate. Some of the division commanders fol- 
lowed their example as did a great many of the men. To a 
person in the rear, in such a position as to be able to see the 
stampede of artillery, wagons and men, the rout seemed com- 
plete. The following incident will show how disgraceful the 
conduct of some of the officers was, of whom we expected bet- 
ter things. Major VanNatta had a little race mare that he 
prized very highly, so much so in fact that he did not care 



about risking her in battle. So he placed her under the care 
of James Singleton, a member of Company A, and told him all 
he would ask of him was to take care of that mare. Jim did 
not have much trouble in keeping her out of danger on Satur- 
day, but when the lines were broken Sunday the first thing 
Jim knew the Johnnies were almost upon him, in fact were too 
close for either comfort or safety. So he concluded discretion 
was the better part of valor, and started as fast as the mare 
could run in the opposite direction. He said his only thought 
was to find a safer place for the mare and "Jim too." He had 
not gone very far until he saw "Old Rosey" a short distance in 
front of him, to all appearances hunting for a place of safety, 
too. He thought "Rosey" was an older hand at the business 
than he was so he would just follow him. He said it was all 
the mare could do to keep in sight of him until they got to 
Chattanooga." 

But the battle was not over. Thomas and Brannon are 
still there as are many others of lesser rank. Firing to the 
southwest of our position that their advance is being resisted 
in that quarter. Our men seem to be falling back for a time. 
The firing increases as it goes further north. By the time it 
is directly west of us it has increased to an awful roar. The 
belching of the artillery shows that it is on much higher ground 
than occupied by us. This is the beginning of the fight on 
Snodgrass Hill. Brannan, with the remainder of his broken 
and shattered division, is the first to occupy this position. It is 
not long until he is joined by Vandeveer with his four regi- 
ments. Other troops swing in on his right and left. Thomas 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



235 



sees at a glance that this is the only chance to save the army 
from destruction. If this position can be held the army may 
be saved. Regiments and brigades as they are rallied come to 
his assistance. Longstreet knows if he can carry this point 
then the day is won. 

The roar of the battle is increasing all the time. At last 
we hear the Rebel yell and know they are charging our lines. 
They are driven back with terrible loss, only to return to the 
charge to be hurled back as before. The ridge on which Thom- 
■ as is making his last stand, is cut in two by a ravine running to 
the north. 

Longstreet soon sees this and is not long taking advantage 
of it. He sends a strong force through this ravine to get in 
Thomas' rear. Thomas has no troops to spare to meet this 
move. He knows that if that is accomplished either slaughter 
or surrender awaits him. A cloud of dust is approaching from 
the north. Is it friends or another move of the enemy ? If 
the former the army may yet be saved. If the latter then all 
is lost. Soon they emerge from the timber and the Stars and 
Stripes come in sight. It is part of the reserve corps under 
Granger. Thomas points out to him this force getting in his 



rear. His force consists of two brigades of Steedman's Di- 
vision. This officer seizes the colors of a regiment and calls 
on his men to follow him at the same time a battery is placed 
in position to rake the enemy's forces with grape and caunister. 
They cannot long withstand this onslaught of fresh troops and 
are soon driven back through the ravine through which they 
came. The danger is now over from this quarter. They will 
not try it again. Another charge is made in front only to 
meet the same fate of former charges. Our men are out of 
ammunition by this time, some of them having fired their last 
cartridge. The order is given to fix bayonets. The enemy 
returns to the charge again to be met by a counter charge 
from our side with cold steel. They are not expecting this and 
fall back in great disorder. This ends the Battle of Ghicka- 
mauga. We were the first troops to engage on Saturday morn- 
ing and the last to leave Sunday evening. 
The losses on our side were as follows : 

Our Brigade (Second) 938 

Our Division ('Third') 2191 

Our Corps (Fourteenth) 61 14 

Total for the Army of the Cumberland 16,170 




On the reverse side of the 
monument is the following 

Number Engaged 366 

Killed 24 

Wounded 136 

Captured 6 

Total Loss .166 



~ -f.« ^ 




COL. WILLIAM B. CARROLL 
Killed at Chickamauga 



This monument marks the line where the battle opened on the 

morning of September 19th, 1863 ; also the spot where 

Colonel Carroll received his death wound. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



237 



The Fourteenth Corps Hospital. 

At the time our regiment (Tenth Indiana) stacked knap- 
sacks the medical department was ordered to get in readiness 
for the battle. The wise ones believed we were going to meet 
more than a brigade that had "got lost." They had a pre- 
monition that there would be a desperate battle before we ar- 
rived at Chattanooga. Consequently we were ordered to be 
prepared. 

General Thomas foresaw the pending struggle and issued 
an order designating the various places for surgeons, assistant 
surgeons and hospital stewards. For our regiment Surgeon 
R. A: Williamon and two men were to accompany the regiment 
on the field. Assistant Surgeon James Killian. Hospital Stew- 
ard James B. Shaw, with the remainder of the medical attaches 
were to report to the medical director of the Fourteenth Corps 
at the Corps Hospital for duty. 

The Corps Hospital was situated on the Chattanooga road 
about half a mile southwest of Snodgrass Hill. After we had 
secured our surgical appliances, medicine, instruments, etc., the 
regiment advanced and the medical department bade each other 
"good bye" and reported for duty. We well knew the "ex- 
ternal grit" of "Old Dock" and knew he would expose himself, 
as he always said he would never run from any "damned Reb- 
el," and he never did. Wes Hunt (Company B) was with him, 
and when our line was driven back "Dock" was deliberately 
walking back with his bridle rein on his arm to the rear of the 
regiment. 



By 9 o'clock the wounded began to arrive. Jasper Ber°'e, 
Company C (Tenth Indiana) was the first man wounded in the 
battle and was the first at the hospital. Surgeon Sloat of the 
Fourteenth Ohio and the Hospital Steward of the Tenth In- 
diana, performed the operation of extracting the ball, which 
was flattened out as large as a silver dollar. Faster they came 
in and in a few hours the entire medical force at the hospital 
had all they could possibly do. Members of the Tenth were 
soon coming in pairs. Lieutenant Hawkins, of Company D, 
Lieutenant Allen, of Company C, James Price, of Company C, 
Major VanNatta, Alonzo Cowgill, orderly of Company D, shot 
through the calves of both legs, a terrible wound, and others 
whose names cannot be recalled at this time. By night we had 
attended 5,000 wounded, among them a large number of Rebs, 
who received the same care and attention as our own men. 

The night was extremely cold and it was with much dif- 
ficulty that we could secure sufficient blankets for the wounded. 
The night was a terrible one. The shrieks of the wounded, 
the groans of the dying were fearful and heartrending in the 
extreme. 

Of course in time the Hospital attaches became hardened 
to this, and paid no attention to it. Simply alleviating all suf- 
fering possible. 

The surgeons and all others who attended the wounded 
got no sleep that night, as ambulances were continually bringing 
them in from some part of the battlefield all night. 

Daylight Sunday morning (20th) revealed a horrible 
sight. Every tent was full of wounded men. Many of them 



2 3 8 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



minus arms and limbs. The first thing in the morning was to 
give them nourishment. Coffee and something to eat. By the 
time this was done the battle opened and by nine o'clock the 
enemy had by some means advanced near the hospital, and 
were evidently going to charge it. Every flag of red, green or 
yellow that could be obtained was displayed to inform them 
that it was a hospital, but it seemed to make no difference to 
them. This created a panic. Men who could not walk the 
night before left the hospital on a dog trot. All who could get 
away had gone, with the exception of four men. One poor fel- 
low was left on a board after his limb had been amputated, the 
surgeon who had performed the operation had deserted him in 
that condition. Fortunately he had tied the arteries so the 
poor fellow wouldn't bleed to death, and those left bandaged 
his limb and carried him to a tent. Finally a Rebel battery 
opened and shells came tearing through the tents, killing some 
and cutting helpless men in two. Matters were assuming a 
serious shape and the four left began to think of Anderson- 
ville and its horrors. At this time a laughable incident occurred. 
Dr. Burdett, surgeon of .the Fourth Kentucky and acting bri- 
gade surgeon came by. He had on his regimentals, green sash 
and a dress sword. When he came up he was asked : "Dock 
what will we do? They are going to charge the hospital, and 
we will be captured; they will not let us attend to the wounded, 
but march us back to the rear ?" With a nasal twang he said : 
"We will stay here, all right." I went into the tent to get some 
appliances, resigned to fate, and when I came out of the tent 
I looked north and "Dock" was going "hell bent" for safety. 



After he had gone about one hundred yards the sword got be- 
tween his legs and he went sprawling some twenty feet. We 
all laughed. He picked himself up, unbuckled the sword, and 
threw it as far as he could, after which he resumed his foot 
race, swearing like a pirate every step. Seeing the brigade 
surgeon go, it was not fair to keep the others there. At this 
time a First Brigade ambulance drove up and we loaded How- 
ard and Stevens, Company F, Berge, Company C, Arthur, 
Company H, and McCullum, Company K, in the ambulance 
and told the driver to "cut for tall timber," which he did. Then 
the order was given "every man for himself and the devil take 
the hindmost." The boys made good time. . In the last tent of 
the center row Al Gray, Company A, came to the door, tears 
coursing down his cheeks, begging for God's sake not to let 
him be captured. The enemy was charging and had already 
entered the south end of the hospital and were coming through. 
Grabbing Al we started out of the north end. Near this was a 
ditch about five feet wide, and rails laid across, this we had to 
"side step," and then down a small ravine we were safe, while 
on the rails we could see the "whites of the Johnnies' eyes," 
who were yelling "halt you d — Yankees," After crossing the 
rails Al yelled back at them "Go to h— you d— grey backs." 
Upon reaching the ravine we went east nearly a mile then up a 
hill which proved to be Snodgrass Hill. In the Snodgrass 
House lived a lone woman. She came out and asked where 
we were going, to which we replied "to Chattanooga." She 
said "you are going in the wrong direction. Down there (point- 
ing to the woods) are thousands of Rebs. The Rebel army is 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



239 



down there."- Looking northeast we saw a flag. "Boys, there 
is old Jim Steedman, now you will hear music." Soon Steed- 
man came up. Throwing his column in line of battle he was 
soon engaged. Lord what firing, what fighting and yelling. 
"Jim" gave them one volley and then the bayonet in division 
front. From our position we had a splendid view of the en- 
tire engagement or so much of its as we cared to look at. An- 
drewville Sample, Company A, came up and we started to the 
Chattanooga road and found the ambulance train all there. 
This must bave been about 3 o'clock in the afternoon when 
Steedman made his appearance and saved "Pap" Thomas and 
the army. 

The ambulance train then proceeded to Rossville. At this 
point some infernal idiot, who should have been promptly shot, 
ordered the wounded all unloaded at Rossville instead of hur- 
rying them to Chattanooga where they could have instant at- 
tention. After all had been unloaded the rumor came that the 
army had been whipped and routed and was coming as fast 



as their legs would carry them. Near this place was a two- 
acre clearing. In this were cattle, prisoners, stragglers and 
"niggers." The teamsters were in a panic, and soldiers know 
what that means. To add to this Rosecrans, McCook and Crit- 
tenden came galloping towards Chattanooga. This action on 
the part of general officers only confirmed the rumor, and then 
"hell was to pay" pure and unadulterated. The wounded were 
hastily loaded and the teamsters and ambulance drivers put on 
the whip. Some of the cooler heads counseled moderation. 
That the army was all right. That "Pap" Thomas was there, 
and he and the army would die in their tracks before they would 
run. This cooled the boys down and we got along fairly well 
until we reached Chattanooga at dark, worked nearly all night 
placing the wounded in the various hospitals and when done 
the whole force dropped from exhaustion and went to sleep 
without any supper. About two hundred of the wounded died 
between Rossville and Chattanooga, the result of first unloading 
and second reloading and the panic. 



CHAPTER X 



Report of Major General George H. Thomas, U. S. Army 
Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps 



G 



Headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps, 

Chattanooga, Tenn., Sept. 30, 1863. 
ENERAL, — I have the honor to report operations of my 
corps from the 1st of September up to date as follows, 
viz, : General Brannan's Division crossed the Ten- 
nessee River at Battle Creek ; General Baird ordered to cross 
his division at Bridgeport and move to Taylor's Store; Gen- 
eral Negley's Division to cross the river at Caperton's Ferry, 
and to report at Taylor's Store also. 

September 2nd. General Bainl's Division moved to Wid- 
ow's Creek. General Negley reports having arrived at Moore's 
Spring, one and one-fourth miles from Taylor's Store and two 
miles from Bridgeport; he was ordered to cross the mountain 
at that point, it being the most direct route to Trenton, in the 
vicinity of which place the corps was ordered to concentrate. 
September 3rd. Headquarters Fourteenth Army Corps 
moved from Bolivar Springs at 6 a. m., via Caperton's Ferry 
to Moore's Spring on the road from Bridgeport to Trenton. 
Baird's Division reached Bridgeport, but could not cross in 
consequence of damage to the bridge; Negley's Division 
marched to Warren's Mill on top of Sand Mountain, on the 



road to Trenton. Brannan's Division reached Graham's store 
on the road from Shellmound to Trenton ; Reynolds' Division 
marched six miles on the Trenton road from Shellmound. 

September 4th. Negley's Division camped at Brown's 
Spring, at the foot of Sand Mountain, in Lookout Valley; 
Brannan's Division at Gordon's Mill on Sand Mountain; Rey- 
nolds' Division at the foot of Sand Mountain two miles from 
Trenton ; Baird's Division crossed the river at Bridgeport and 
camped at that point ; Corps headquarters at Moore's Spring. 

September 5th. Baird's Division arrived at Moore's 
Spring; Negley's Division still in camp at Brown's Spring. He 
reports having sent forward a reconnaissance of two regiments 
of infantry and a section of artillery to scour the country to- 
ward Chattanooga and secure some captured stores near Macon 
Iron Works. They captured some Confederate Army supplies. 
No report from Brannan's Division ; Reynolds' Division in 
camp at Trenton; Brannan somewhere in the neighborhood; 
corps headquarters at Warren's Mill. 

September 6th. Baird's Division encamped at Warren's 
Mill ; Negley's Division reached Johnson's Creek ; Beatty's 
Brigade was sent up the road to seize Steven's Gap. Met the 



242 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



enemy's pickets and it being dark, did not proceed farther. The 
Eighteenth Ohio of Negley's Division, went to the top of Look- 
out Mountain, beyond Payne's Mill ; met the enemy's pickets 
and dispersed them. The head of Brannan's column reached 
Lookout Valle}', two miles below Trenton ; Reynolds' Division 
in camp at Trenton. Rumors of the enemy's design to evacu- 
ate Chattanooga. Corps headquarters at Brown's Spring. 

September 7. Baird's Division closed up with Negley's in 
the mouth of Johnson's Crook. Negley gained possession of 
the top of the mountain and secured forks of the road. Bran- 
nan's Division reached Trenton ; Reynolds remained in camp 
at that place. Corps headquarters at Brown's Spring. 

September 8. Baird's Division remained in its camp of 
yesterday, at tine junction of Hurricane and Lookout Creeks. 
Negley's Division moved up to the top of Lookout Mountain, 
at the head of Johnson's Crook, one brigade occupying the pass ; 
another brigade was sent forward and seized Cooper's Gap, 
sending one regiment to the foot of the gap to occupy and hold 
it; one regiment was also sent forward to seize Stevens' Gap, 
which was heavily obstructed with fallen trees. Brannan's 
Division occupied the same position as last night. Reynolds' 
Division headquarters at Trenton, with one brigade at Payne's 
Mill, three miles south of Trenton. Headquarters of the corps 
still at Brown's Spring. 

September 9. Baird's Division moved across Lookout 
Mountain to support Negley. Negley's Division moved across 
the mountain and took up a position in McLemore's Cove, near 
Rodger's farm, throwing out his skirmishers as far as Bailey's 



Cross Roads ; saw the enemy's cavalry in front, drawn up in 
line ; citizens reported a heavy force concentrated in his front 
at Dug Gap, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. 
Brannan's Division in camp same as yesterday; Reynolds' Di- 
vision also. The Ninety-second Illinois ("mounted infantry), 
sent on a reconnaissance toward Chattanooga, along the ridge 
of Lookout Mountain. Colonel Atkins commanding the Ninety- 
second Illinois, reports, September gth, 1 1 a. m., entered Chat- 
tanooga as the rear of the enemy's column was evacuating the 
place ; corps headquarters moved from Brown's Spring to 
Eastley's farm, on Trenton and Lebanon road. 

September 10. General Negley's in front of or one mile 
west of Dug Gap, which has been heavily obstructed by the 
enemy and occupied by a strong picket line. General Baird 
ordered to move up tonight to Negley's support. General 
Reynolds to move at daylight to support Baird's left, and Gen- 
eral Brannan to move at 8 a. m. tomorrow morning to support 
Reynolds. Headquarters and General Reynolds' Division 
camped at foot of the mountain ; Brannan's Division at Easley's. 

September 11. Baird's Division closed up Negley's at 
Widow Davis' house about 8 A. M. Soon afterward, Negley 
being satisfied from his own observations, and from reports 
of officers sent out to reconnoiter, and also from loyal citizens 
that the enemy was advancing on him in very superior force, 
and that his train was in imminent danger of being cut off if 
he accepted battle at Davis' Cross Roads, determined to fall 
back to a strong position in front of Stevens' Gap. This move- 
ment he immediately proceeded to put into execution, and by 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



243 



his untiring energy and skill, and with the prompt co-operation 
of Baird succeeded in gaining possession of the hills in front 
of Stevens' Gap and securing his trains, without losing a sin- 
gle wagon. For a detailed account of this movement see reports 
of Generals Negley and Baird, annexed marked A and B. 
General Turchin, commanding the Third Brigade. Reynolds' 
Division, was pushed forward by way of Cooper's Gap, to 
Negley's support, on the left, reaching his position about 10 
A. M. Orders were sent to General Brannan to close up as 
rapidly as possible. Corps headquarters at top of Cooper's 
Gap. 

September 12. Brannan's Division reached Negley's po- 
sition by 8 a. m. and took post next on left of Baird. Rey- 
nolds' Division was posted on the left of Brannan, one brigade 
covering Cooper's Gap. Reports from citizens go to confirm 
the impression that a large force of the enemy is concentrated 
at Lafayette. A report from General McCook confirms that 
fact. A later dispatch from the same source says it is reported 
that Bragg's whole army, with Johnston's is at Lafayette. 
Generals Brannan and Baird, with parts of their commands, 
went out on a reconnaissance toward Dug Gap at 1 P. M. today. 
General Brannan reports they advanced two miles beyond Da- 
vis' Cross Roads, without finding any enemy with the excep- 
tion of a few mounted men. Corps headquarters encamped at 
top of Steven's Gap. 

September 13. Negley's, Baird's and Brannan's Divisions 
remained in their camps of yesterday awaiting the arrival of 
McCook's Corps, which had been ordered to close up to the 



left. Reynolds concentrated his division on the road from 
Cooper's Gap to Catlett's Gap. Two deserters from the Eigh- 
teenth Tennessee, state that they belong to Buckner's Corps. 
Buckner's Corps consists of eight brigades and two batteries 
of six guns each; were in the fight with Negley, saw a brigade 
of Forrest's Cavalry, commanded by Forrest in person, pass 
toward the fight on the nth. Hill's and Buckner's Corps were 
both engaged. Bragg's Army is concentrated at Lafayette. 
Headquarters moved by way of Cooper's Gap to the foot of 
the mountain. 

September 14. General Reynolds took up a position at 
Pond Spring with his two infantry brigades, and was joined 
by Wilder at that place. Turchin's Brigade of Reynolds' Di- 
vision, made a reconnaissance to the mouth of Catlett's Gap 
with the Ninety-second Illinois (mounted infantry). Was op- 
posed by Rebel mounted pickets from Chickamauga Creek to 
the mouth of Catlett's Gap, at which place he found their re- 
serve drawn up, also a strong line of skirmishers to the right 
of the road, but having received instructions to avoid bringing 
on an engagement, he returned to camp with the brigade leav- 
ing two regiments on Chattanooga Valley road, strongly posted 
on outposts. General Brannan advanced one brigade of his 
division to Chickamauga Creek, east of Lee's Mill, one mile 
to the right and south of Reynolds' position at Pond Spring. 
A mounted reconnaissance was also pushed forward to within 
a mile of Blue Bird Gap without encountering any of the ene- 
my. A negro who had been taken before General Buckner 
yesterday and released again reports that Buckner and his 










KELLEY FIELD AND HOUSE. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



245 



corps are in Cattlett's Gap preparing to defend that place. A 
negro woman, lately from the neighborhood of Dug Gap re- 
ports a large force of Rebels between Dug Gap and Lafayette. 
September 16. Corps headquarters and First and Second 
Divisions remained in camp, as last reported, at foot of Stevens' 
Gap. Turchin's Brigade of Reynolds' Division, made a re- 
connaissance toward Cattlett's Gap. The enemy fell back as he 
advanced, until he came upon a force strongly posted, with 
two pieces of artillery, in the road. He made a second recon- 
naissance at 2 P. M. of that day with but little further result, 
as he could advance but a short distance further, the enemy 
being in force in his front. 

'September 17. First, Second and Third Divisions changed 
their positions from their camps of yesterday: Baird's (First) 
Division, with its right resting at Gower's Ford, and extend- 
ing along Chickamauga Creek to Baird's Mill; Negley's (Sec- 
ond) Division, with its right at Bird's Mill and its left con- 
necting with YanCleve's Division at Owen's Ford; Brannan's 
(Third) Division on the right of the First, covering four fords 
between Gower's Ford and Pond Spring. One brigade of 
Reynolds' (Fourth) Division thrown out in front of Pond 
Spring, on the Catlett's Gap road covering the pass through 
the mountains. Wilder's Brigade detached and ordered to 
report to department headquarters. The left of McCook's 
Corps closed in ; connected with our right near Pond Spring. 

September 18. At 4 P. M. the whole corps moved to the 
left along Chickamauga Creek to Crawfish Springs. On ar- 
riving at that place received orders to march on the cross roads 



by Widow Glenn's house to the Chattanooga and Lafayette 
road and take up a position near Kelly's farm on the Lafay- 
ette road, connecting with Crittenden on my right at Gordon's 
Mills. The head of the column reached Kelly's farm about 
daylight on the 19th. Baird's Division in front and took up a 
position at the forks of the road, facing toward Reed's and 
Alexander's Bridges over the Chickamauga. Colonel Wilder, 
commanding the mounted brigade of Reynolds' Division, in- 
formed me that the enemy had crossed the Chickamauga in 
force at those two bridges the evening before and drove his 
brigade across the state road, or Chattanooga and Lafayette 
road, to the heights east of Widow Glenn's house. Kelly's is 
situated in an opening about three-fourths of a mile long and 
one-fourth of a mile wide, on the east side of the state road, 
and stretches along that road in a northerly direction with a 
small field of perhaps twenty acres on the west side of the 
road, directly opposite to the house. From thence to the Chick- 
amauga the surface of the country is undulating and covered 
with original forest timber, interspersed with undergrowth, in 
many places so dense that it is difficult to see fifty paces ahead. 
There is a cleared field near Jay's Mill, and cleared land in 
the vicinity of Reed's and Alexander's bridges. A narrow field 
commences at a point about a fourth of a mile south of Kelly's 
house on the east side of the state road and extends, perhaps 
for half a mile along the road toward Gordon's Mills. Be- 
tween the state road and the foot of Missionary Ridge there is 
a skirt of timber stretching from the vicinity of Widow Glenn's 
house, south of the forks of the road to McDonald's house, 



246 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INEANTRY 



three-fourths of a mile north of Kelly's. The eastern slope 
of the Missionary Ridge, between Glenn's and McDonald's, is 
cleared and mostly under cultivation. This position of Baird's 
threw my right in close proximity to Wilder's Brigade ; the 
interval I intended to fill up with the two remaining brigades 
of Reynolds' Division on their arrival. General Brannan close- 
ly. following Baird's Division, was placed in position on his left, 
on the two roads leading from the state road to Reed's and 
Alexander's bridges. Colonel Dan McCook, commanding a 
brigade of the Reserve Corps, met me at General Baird's 
headquarters and reported to me that he had been stationed 
the previous night on the road leading to Reed's bridge, and 
that he could discover no force of the enemy except one brigade, 
which had crossed to the west side of the Chickamauga at 
Reed's Bridge the day before; and he believed it could be cut 
off because after it had crossed, he had destroyed the bridge, 
the enemy having retired toward Alexander's Bridge. Upon 
this information I directed General Brannan to post a brigade 
within supporting distance of Baird, on the road to Alexander's" 
bridge, and with his other two brigades to reconnoiter the road 
leading to Reed's bridge to see if he could locate the brigade 
reported by Colonel McCook, and if a favorable opportunity 
occurred, to capture it. His dispositions were made according 
to instructions by 9 a. m. 

General Baird was directed to throw forward his right 
wing, so as to get more nearly in line with Brannon, but to 
watch well on his right flank. Soon after this disposition of 
those two divisions, a portion of Palmer's Division of Critten- 



den's Corps took position to the right of General Baird's Di- 
vision. About 10 o'clock Croxton's Brigade of Brannan's Di- 
vision, posted on the road leading to Alexander's bridge, be- 
came engaged with the enemy, and I rode forward to his po- 
sition to ascertain the character of the attack. Colonel Croxton 
reported to me he had driven the enemy nearly half a mile, 
but that he was meeting with obstinate resistance. I then 
rode back to Baird's position and directed him to advance to 
Croxton's support, which he did with his whole division, 
Starkweather's Brigade in reserve, and drove the enemy stead- 
ily before him for some distance, taking many prisoners. 
Croxton's Brigade, which had been heavily engaged for over 
an hour with greatly superior numbers of the enemy, and 
being nearly exhausted of ammunition, was then moved to 
the rear, to enable the men to fill up their boxes; and Baird 
and Brannan, having united their forces, drove the enemy 
from their immediate front. General Baird then halted for 
the purpose of readjusting his line ; and hearing from pris- 
oners that the enemy were in heavy force on his immediate 
right, he threw back his right wing in order to be ready for 
an attack from that quarter. Before his dispositions could 
be completed, the enemy, in overwhelming numbers, furiously 
assaulted Scribner's and King's Brigades, and drove them in 
disorder. Fortunately, at this time, Johnson's Division, of Mc- 
Cook's Corps, and Reynold's Division, of my corps, arrived 
and were immediately placed in position. Johnson preceded 
Reynolds, his left connecting with Baird's right, and Palmer 
being immediately on Johnson's right, Reynolds was placed 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



247 



on the right of Palmer, with one brigade of his division in 
reserve. As soon as formed they advanced upon the enemy, 
attacking him in flank and driving him in great disorder for 
a mile and a half, while Brannan's troops met him in front 
as he was pursuing Baird's retiring brigades, driving the head 
of his column back and retaking the artillery, which had been 
temporarily lost by Baird's Brigades, the Ninth Ohio recover- 
ing Battery IT, Fifth U. S. Artillery, at the point of the 
bayonet. The enemy, at this time being hard pressed by John- 
son, Palmer and Reynolds in flank, fell back in confusion 
upon his reserves, posted in a strong position on the west 
side of Chickamauga Creek between Reed's and Alexander's 
Bridges. 

Brannan and Baird were then ordered to reorganize their 
commands and take position on commanding ground on the 
road from McDonald's to Reed's Bridge, and hold it to the 
last extremity, as I expected the next effort of the enemy 
would be to gain that road and our rear. This was about 2 
p. m. After a lull of about one hour, a furious attack was 
made upon Reynolds' right, and he having called upon me for 
re-enforcements, I directed Brannan's Division to move to 
his support, leaving King's Brigade of Baird's Division, to 
hold the position which Baird and Brannan had been posted, 
the balance of Baird's Division closing up to the right on 
Johnson's Division. It will be seen by General Reynold's 
report, Croxton's Brigade- -of -Brannan's Division reached his 
right just in time to defeat the enemy's efforts to turn Rey- 
nold's right and rear. 



About 5 p. m., my lines at that time being very much 
extended in pursuing the enemy, I determined to concentrate 
them on more commanding ground, as I felt confident we 
should have a renewal of the battle in the morning. I rode 
forward to General Johnson's position and designated to him 
where to place his division ; also to General Baird, who was 
present with Johnson. I then rode back to the cross-roads to 
locate Palmer and Reynolds on Johnson's right and on the 
crest of the ridge about 500 yards east of the state road. Soon 
after Palmer and Reynolds got their positions, and while 
Brannan was getting his on the ridge west of the state road 
near Dyer's house, and to the rear and right of Reynolds', 
where I had ordered him as a reserve, the enemy assaulted 
first Johnson, and then Baird, in a most furious manner, pro- 
ducing some confusion, but order was soon restored, and the 
enemy repulsed in fine style, after which these two divisions 
took up the positions assigned them for the night. 

Before adjusting the line satisfactorily, I received an 
order to report to department headquarters immediately and 
was absent from my command until near midnight. After 
my return from department headquarters about 2 a. m., on 
the 20th, I received a report from General Baird that the left 
of his division did not rest on the Reed's Bridge road, as I 
had intended, and that he could not reach it without weak- 
ening his line too much. I immediately addressed a note to 
the general commanding requesting that General Negley be 
sent me to take a position on Baird's left and rear, and thus 
secure our left from assault. During the night the troops 




POB FIELD LOOKING BAST. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



249 



threw up temporary breastworks of logs, and prepared for- 
the encounter which all anticipated would come off next day. 

Although informed by note from General Rosecrans' 
headquarters that Negley's Division would be sent immediately 
to take post on my left, it had not arrived at 7 a. m., on the 
20th, and I sent Captain Willard, of my staff, to General 
Negley to urge him forward as rapidly as possible, and to 
point out his position to him. - General Negley, in his official 
report, mentions that he received this order through Captain 
Willard at 8 a. m., on the 20th, and that he immediately com- 
menced withdrawing his division for that purpose, when the 
enemy was reported to be massing a heavy force in his front, 
sharply engaging his skirmishers, and that he was directed by 
General Rosecrans to hold his position until relieved by some 
other command. General Beatty's Brigade, however, was sent 
under the guidance of Captain Willard, who took it to its 
position and it went into action immediately. 

The enemy at that time commenced a furious assault on 
Baird's left, and partially succeeded in gaining his rear. Beatty, 
meeting with superior numbers, was compelled to fall back 
until relieved by the fire of several regiments of Palmer's 
reserve, which I had ordered to the support of the left, being 
placed in position by General Baird, and which regiments, with 
the co-operation of Van Derveer's Brigade, of Brannan's 
Division, and a portion of Stanley's Brigade, of Negley's 
Division, drove the enemy entirely from Baird's left and rear. 
General Baird being still hardly pressed in front, f ordered 
General Wood, who had just reported to me in person, to send 
one of the brigades of his division to General Baird. 



He replied that his division had been ordered by General 
Rosecrans to support Reynolds' right, but if I would take the 
responsibility of changing his orders, he would cheerfully 
obey them, and sent Barnes' Brigade, the head of which had 
just reached my position. General Wood then left me to 
rejoin the remainder of his division, which was still coming up. 

To prevent a repetition of this attack of the enemy on 
our left f directed Captain Gaer, chief topographical officer 
on my staff, to go to the commanding officer of the troops 
on the left and rear of Baird, and direct him to mass as much 
artillery on the slopes of Missionary Ridge, west of the state 
road, as he could conveniently spare from his lines, supported 
strongly by infantry, so as to sweep the ground to the left 
and rear of Baird's position. This order, General Negley in 
his official report, mentions as having received through Captain 
Gaer, but from his description of the position he assumed he 
must have misunderstood my order and instead of massing 
the artillery near Baird's left, it was posted on the right of 
Brannan's Division, nearly in rear of Reynolds' right. At the 
time that the assault just described was made on Baird, the 
enemy attacked Johnson, Palmer and Reynolds, with equal 
fierceness, which was continued at least two hours, making 
assault after assault with fresh troops, which were met by my 
troops with a most determined coolness and deliberation. The 
enemy having exhausted his utmost energies to dislodge us, 
apparently fell back entirely from our front, and we were not 
disturbed again until near night, after the withdrawal of the 
troops to Rossville had commenced. Just before the repulse 
of the enemy on our left, General Beatty came to me for fresh 



250 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INEANTRY 



troops, in person, stating that most of those I had sent him had 
gone back to the rear and right, and he was anxious to get at 
least another brigade before they attacked him again. I im- 
mediately sent Captain Kellogg to hurry up General Sheridan, 
whose division I had been informed, would be sent to me. 

About 2 p. m., very soon after Captain Kellogg left me, 
hearing heavy firing to my right and rear through the woods, 
I turned in that direction and was riding to the slope of 
the hill in my rear to ascertain the cause. Just as I passed 
out of the woods bordering the state road, I met Captain Kel- 
logg returning, who reported to me that in attempting to reach 
General Sheridan he had met a large force in an open corn-field 
to the rear of Reynolds' position, advancing cautiously, with 
a strong line of skirmishers thrown out to their front, and that 
they had fired on him and forced him to return. He had 
reported to Colonel Harker, commanding a brigade of Wood's 
Division, posted on a ridge a short distance to the rear of 
Reynolds' position, who also saw this force advancing, but 
with Captain Kellogg, was of the opinion that they might be 
Sheridan's troops coming to our assistance. I rode forward 
to Colonel Harker's position, and told him that, although I 
was expecting Sheridan from that direction, if those troops 
fired on him, seeing his flag, he must return their fire and 
resist their further advance. He immediately ordered his 
skirmishers to commence firing, and tcok up a position with 
his brigade on the crest of a hill a short distance to his right 
and rear, placing his right in connection with Brannan's Divi- 
sion and portions of Beatty's and Stanley's Brigades of Neg- 



ley's Division, which had been retired to that point from the 
left, as circumstantially narrated in the reports of General John 
Beatty and Colonel Stanley. 

I then rode to the crest o fthe hill referred to above. On 
my way I met General Wood, who confirmed me in the opinion 
that the troops advancing upon us was the enemy, although 
we were not then aware of the disaster to the right and center 
of our army. I then directed him to place his division on the 
prolongation of Brannan's, who, I had ascertained from Wood, 
was on the top of the hill above referred to, and to resist the 
farther advance of the enemy as long as possible. I sent 
my aide, Capt. Kellogg, to notify Gen. Reynolds that our right 
had been turned, and that the enemy was in his rear in force. 
Gen. Wood barely had time to dispose his troops on the left of 
Brannan before another of those fierce assaults, similar to 
those made in the morning on my line, was made on him and 
Brannan combined, and kept up by the enemy, throwing in 
fresh troops as fast as those in their front were driven back, 
until near nightfall. About the time that Wood took up his 
position, General Gordon Granger appeared on my left flank 
at the head of Steedman's Division of his corps. I immediately 
dispatched a staff officer, Captain Johnson, Second Indiana 
Cavalry, of Negley's Division, to him with orders to push for- 
ward and take position on Brannan's right, which order was 
obeyed with the greatest promptness and alacrity, Steedman 
moving his division into position with almost as much precision 
as if on drill, and fighting his way to the crest of the hill on 
Brannan's right, moved forward his artillery and drove the 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



25 1 



enemy down the southern slope, inflicting on him a most ter- 
rible loss in killed and wounded. This opportune arrival of 
fresh troops revived the flagging spirits of our men on the 
right, and inspired them with new ardor for the contest. Every 
assault of the enemy from that time until nightfall was re- 
pulsed in the most gallant style by the whole line. 

By this time the ammunition in the boxes of the men was 
reduced, on an average, to 2 or 3 rounds per man, and my 
ammunition trains having been unfortunately ordered to the 
rear by some unauthorized person, we should have been en- 
tirely without ammunition in a very short time had not a 
small supply come up with General Steedman's command. 
This, being distributed among the troops, gave them 10 rounds 
per man. 

General Garfield, chief of staff of General Rosecrans, 
reached this position about 4 p. m., in company with Lieut. 
Colonel Thruston, of McCook's staff, and Captains Gaw and 
Barker, of my staff, who had been sent to the rear to bring 
back the ammunition, if possible. General Garfield gave me 
the first reliable information that the right and center of our 
army had been driven, and of its condition at that time. I soon 
after received a dispatch from General Rosecrans, directing 
me to assume command of all the forces, and with Crittenden 
and McCook, take a strong position and assume a threatening 
attitude at Rossville, sending the unorganized forces to Chat- 
anooga for reorganization, stating that he would examine the 
ground at Chattanooga and then join me; also that he had sent 
out rations and ammunition to meet me at Rossville. 



I determined to hold the position until nightfall, if pos- 
sible, in the meantime sending Captains Barker and Kellogg 
to distribute the ammunition, Major Lawrence, my chief of 
artillery, having been previously sent to notify the different 
commanders that ammunition would be supplied them shortly. 
As soon as they reported the disposition of the ammunition, I 
directed Captain Willard to inform the division commanders 
to prepare to withdraw their commands as soon as they re- 
ceived orders. 

At 5 130 p. m., Captain Barker, commanding my escort, 
was sent to notify General Reynolds to commence the move- 
ment, and I left the position behind General Wood's command 
to meet Reynolds and point out to him the position where I 
wished him to form in line to cover the retirement of the 
other troops on the left. 

In passing through an open woods bordering on the state 
road and between my last and Reynolds' position, I was cau- 
tioned by a couple of soldiers, who had been to hunt water, 
that there was a large force of rebels in these woods, drawn 
up in line and advancing toward me. Just at this time I saw 
the head of Reynolds' column approaching, and calling to the 
general himself, directed him to form line perpendicular to the 
state road, changing the head of his column to the left, with 
his right resting on that road, and to charge the enemy, who 
were then in his immediate front. This movement was made 
with the utmost promptitude, and facing to the right while on 
the march. Turchin threw his brigade upon the Rebel force, 




BROTHERTON FIELD, LOOKING EAST 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



253 



routing them and driving them in utter confusion entirely 
beyond Laird's left. In this splendid advance more than 200 
prisoners were captured and sent to the rear. 

Colonel Robinson, commanding the Second Brigade, Rey- 
nolds' Division, followed closely on Turchin, and I posted him 
on the road leading through the ridge, to hold the ground, 
while the troops on our right .and left passed by. In a few 
moments, General Willich, commanding a brigade of John- 
son's Division, reported to me that his brigade was in position 
on a commanding piece of ground to the right of the ridge 
road. I directed him to report to General Reynolds, and 
assist in covering the retirement of our troops. Turchin's 
Brigade, after driving the enemy a mile and a half, was re- 
assembled and took position on the ridge road, with Robin- 
son and Willich. 

These dispositions being made, I sent orders to Generals 
Wood, Brannan and Granger to withdraw from their positions. 
Johnson's and Baird's Divisions were attacked at the moment 
of retiring, but being prepared, retired without confusion or 
any serious losses. General Palmer was also attacked while 
retiring. Grose's Brigade was thrown into some confusion, 
but Cruft's Brigade came off in good style, both however with 
little loss. I then proceeded to Rossville, accompanied by Gen- 
erals Garfield and Gordon Granger, and immediately prepared 
to place the troops in position at that point. One brigade of 
Negley's Division was posted at the gap on the Ringgold Road, 
and two brigades on the top of the ridge to the right of the 
road, adjoining the brigade in the road; Reynolds' Division 
on the right of Negley's and reaching to the Dry Valley Road ; 



Brannan's Division in the rear of Reynolds' right, as a reserve; 
McCook's Corps on the Dry Valley Road, and stretching to- 
ward the west, his right reaching nearly to Chattanooga Creek ; 
Crittenden's entire corps was posted on the heights to the left 
of the Ringgold Road, with Steedman's Division, of Granger's 
Corps, in reserve behind his left ; Baird's Division in reserve, 
and in supporting distance of the brigade in the gap; McCook's 
Brigade, of Granger's Corps, was also posted as a reserve to 
the brigade of Negley on the top of the ridge, to the right of 
the road ; Minty's Brigade of cavalry was on the Ringgold road, 
about a mile and a half in advance of the Gap. 

About 10 a. m., of the 21st, receiving a message from 
Minty that the enemy were advancing on him with a strong 
force of cavalry and infantry, I directed him to retire through 
the gap and post his command on our left flank, and throw 
out strong reconnoitering parties across the ridge to observe 
and report any movements of the enemy on our left front. 
From information received from citizens, I was convinced that 
the position was untenable in the face of the odds we had 
opposed to us, as the enemy could easily concentrate upon 
our right flank, which, if driven, would expose our center 
and left to be entirely cut off from our communications. T 
therefore advised the commanding general to concentrate the 
troops at Chattanooga. About the time I made the suggestion 
to withdraw, the enemy made a demonstration on the direct 
road but were soon repulsed. 

In anticipation of this order to concentrate at Chattanooga 
I sent for the corps commanders, and gave such general in- 



254 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



structions as would enable them to prepare their commands for 
making the movement without confusion. All wagons, ambu- 
lances and surplus artillery carriages were sent to the rear 
before night. The order for the withdrawal being received 
about 6 p. m., the movement commenced at 9 p. m., in the fol- 
lowing order : Strong skirmish lines, under the direction of 
judicious officers, were thrown out to the front of each divi- 
sion to cover this movement, with directions to retire at day- 
light, deployed and in supporting distance, the whole to be 
supported by the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, under 
the superintendence of Major General Rousseau, assisted by 
Minty's Brigade of Cavalry, which was to follow after the 
skirmishers. Crittenden's Corps was to move from the hill to 
the left of the road at 9 p. m., followed by Steedman's Divi- 
sion. Next, Negley's Division was to withdraw at 10 p. m., 
then Reynolds' and McCook's Corps by divisions from left to 
right, moving within supporting distance one after the other. 
Brannan's Division was posted at 6 p. m., on the road, about 
half way between Rossville and Chattanooga, to cover the 
movement. 

The troops were withdrawn in a quiet, orderly manner, 
without the loss of a single man, and by 7 a. m., on the 22nd, 
were in their positions in front of Chatanooga, which had been 
assigned to them previous to their arrival, and which they now 
occupy, covered by strong intrenchments thrown up on the day 
of our arrival, and strengthened from day to day until con- 
sidered sufficiently strong for all defensive purposes. 



I herewith submit annexed a consolidated report of the 
casualties of the Fourteenth Army Corps. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Geo. H. Thomas. 
Major General U. S. Volunteers, Commanding. 



Report of Brigadier General John M. Brannan. 

Headquarters Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. 

Near Chattanooga, Tenn., September 29, 1863. 

Colonel : — I have the honor to forward, for the informa- 
tion of the Major General commanding, the following report 
of the part taken by my division (Third, Fourteenth Army 
Corps) during the engagement on the 19th and 20th, Septem- 
ber, 1863, on Chickamauga Creek. 

In accordance with orders, I struck the camp of my divi- 
sion at Gower's Ford, Chickamauga Creek, at about 5 p. m., 
on the 18th inst, and advanced by the Chattanooga road to the 
junction of the Lafayette road about 3 miles above Crawfish 
Springs, whence, taking the latter road, I arrived by daylight 
at a point about 2.y 2 miles distant from its junction with the 
Chattanooga road. 

I was much retarded in this march, which continued dur- 
ing the entire night, by the delay of the Twenty-First Corps 
in getting into position, having frequently to halt for a con- 
siderable time to enable portions of that command to come up 
from the rear of my column. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



2 55 



On arriving at a point on the Lafayette Road, known as 
Kelly's House, I received orders from Major General Thomas 
to capture, if possible, a Rebel force represented by Colonel 
Dan McCook to be a brigade cut off on the west side of 
Chickamauga Creek ; failing in this, to drive it across the 
creek. In obedience to these instructions I advanced the Sec- 
ond Brigade of my division, (Colonel John T. Croxton, Fourth 
Kentucky Infantry, Commanding), by the Reed's Bridge road 
toward the Rebel left, while the remaining brigades of my 
command advanced by the Daffron's Ford road to strike the 
supposed right of the enemy's position. 

Shortly after 7 a. m., on the 19th inst, the Second Brigade 
having advanced about three-quarters of a mile toward the 
Chickamauga, came upon a strong force of the enemy, con- 
sisting of two divisions instead of the supposed brigade, who 
made a furious attack, repulsing Colonel Croxton's first ad- 
vance. The Rebels following this up with a much superior 
force, a desperate conflict ensued, Colonel Croxton maintain- 
ing his ground with great determination, and though suffering 
considerable loss, refusing to yield his position to the most 
furious efforts of the Rebels. At this point Colonel Carroll, 
Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, fell mortally 
wounded while gallantly leading his regiment, and Lieut. Col- 
onel P. B. Hunt, commanding Fourth Kentucky, was carried 
from the field in a scarcely less precarious condition. On 
Colenel Hunt being wounded I set Major R. M. Kelly, division 
inspector, at his own request, to command the Fourth Ken- 
tucky, which he did that day and the following in the most 



gallant manner. I here reinforced Colonel Croxton with the 
Thirty-First Ohio Infantry (Lieut. Colonel Lister, command- 
ing) from the left, being the only force available. 

In the meantime, the Third Brigade, (Colonel F. Van 
Derveer, Thirty-Fifth Ohio, commanding), supported by the 
First Brigade, with two regiments (Colonel J. M. Council, Sev- 
enteenth Ohio, commanding), having advanced about i T / 2 miles 
on the Daffron's Ford road, came into collision with the Rebels 
strongly posted, who opened with a tremendous fire of mus- 
ketry and cannon at short range. This, however, could not 
deter the Third Brigade, which bore back to within one-quarter 
of a mile of the creek, when the Rebels, making a feint on the 
left, rapidly threw a heavy force on my right, and succeeded in 
partially piercing the center, where the communication with 
the extreme right was unavoidably weak and disconnected. 

About this period, at my repeated and earnest request for 
re-enforcements, General Thomas sent the First Division tn 
my support, and the greater portion of that command advanced 
to my center to arrest the movements of the enemy in that 
quarter. In this, however, the First Division failed, the troops 
retiring with some precipitancy, leaving the battery of the reg- 
ular brigade in the hands of the Rebels, and communication 
entirely cut off between my extreme flanks. I, however, suc- 
ceeded in preventing the Rebels from following up their ad- 
vantage at this point by a charge of the First and Third 
Brigades, during which the battery of the regular brigade 
was retaken at the point of the bayonet by the Ninth Ohio 
Infantry. 




SNODGRASS HOUSE— GENERAL THOMAS' HEADQUARTERS. 
On this hill Thomas made his last stand and saved the Army of the Cumberland. 
The 10th and 74th Indiana were the last troops to leave. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



257 



The enemy, however, continued to press heavily on the 
center, and finding it impossible to re-establish and hold com- 
munication between my flanks, I withdrew to a ridge about a 
half mile from the Lafayette Road, removing my dead and 
wounded, and formed a line there, without molestation, at 
about 2 p. m. 

About 3 p. an., by direction of Major General Thomas, I 
moved the First and Third Brigades to the right in rear of 
the Second Brigade, and subsequently, in accordance with 
orders to that effect, withdrew my entire division to the right, 
on the Lafayette Road, resigning my first position to Baird's, 
Palmer's and Johnson's Divisions. 

During this day the Second Brigade maintained a severe 
conflict, without intermission, for a period of six hours, re- 
pulsing with great slaughter the repeated attacks of a much 
superior force, and capturing 5 guns, which they brought off 
the field. The other brigades of the division cannot have had 
less severe work, owing to the number of points from which 
they were at different times attacked, and a vastly superior 
force of the enemy immediately opposed to them. 

ft was only by the most unflinching courage and determina- 
tion that these points could be held before the overwhelming 
masses of troops hurled against them by the Rebels, whose 
every effort appeared to be directed toward breaking this line, 
and securing the line of communication in its rear. 

f bivouacked on the night of the 19th on a line perpendic- 
ular to the Lafayette Road, my left brigade nearly joining it 
at Dyer's House, and my two right brigades thrown back at 



right angles on the heights of Missionary Ridge. During the 
night I was ordered to put two brigades into line, connecting 
Reynolds' and Negley's Divisions, which I accordingly did, 
completing the movement before daylight on the 20th. I 
moved the Third Brigade, of my division, shortly after day- 
light of the 20th, as support in rear of the First and Second 
Brigades, f had now two brigades in line with one support, 
Negley being on my right and Reynolds on my left. After a 
continuous flank movement of some duration by the entire line 
to the left, the engagement began at about 9 a. m., by a furious 
attack on Baird's Division, which, proving of a determined 
nature, my supporting brigade was ordered to support ' that 
division, Negley having previously been removed to the ex- 
treme left of the corps and Van Cleve, who had replaced him, 
having shortly afterwards been ordered in the same direction. 
Wood was now on my immediate right. Wood being almost 
immediately afterward ordered to the left, moved out of the 
line, while Davis took ground to his left to fill the vacancy 
caused by Wood. In this movement a slight interval occurred 
in the line, which the Rebels took advantage of with great 
rapidity, intercepting and breaking the line of battle of the 
army at that point. Wood, being taken while marching by 
the flank, broke and fled in confusion, and my line, actually 
attacked from the rear, was obliged to swing back on the 
right, which it accomplished with wonderful regularity under 
such circumstance (with, however, the exception of a portion 
of the First Brigade, which, being much exposed, broke with 
considerable disorder.) The line now being broken and se- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



verely pressed at this point, and great confusion prevailing in 
the supports, composed of Wood's and Van Cleve's Divisions, 
I formed the remnant of my command (and such stragglers 
from other commands as I could rally and bring into position) 
into line, to resist, if possible, the pressure of the now ad- 
vancing Rebels. 

In this manner I succeeded in holding the enemy in check 
for a considerable time, until finding that the Rebels were mov- 
ing on my right to gain command of the valley by which the 
right (McCook) was retreating, I swung back my right flank, 
and, moving about half a mile to the rear, took up a good 
position on a commanding ridge, General Negley (who had a 
portion of his command intact) having pledged himself to 
hold my right and rear. 

Finding that this latter point was the key to the position 
so desired by the enemy, I made every preparation to defend 
it to the last, my command being somewhat increased by the 
arrival of portions of Palmer's (Van Cleve's?) and Negley's 
Divisions, and most opportunely re-enforced by Colonel Van 
Derveer's Brigade (Third) which, having successfully, though 
with great loss, held its precarious position in the general line, 
until all in its vicinity had retreated, retired in good order, 
actually cutting its way through the Rebels to rejoin my divi- 
sion. This gallant brigade was one of the few who maintained 
their organization perfect through the hard-fought passes of 
that portion of the field. 

Nothing can exceed the desperate determination with 
which the Rebels endeavored to gain possession of this point, 



hurling entire divisions on my small force in their fierce eager- 
ness to obtain a position which would undoubtedly have given 
them great advantage of the day. My troops maintained their 
ground with great obstinacy, evincing great gallantry and devo- 
tion in the most trying circumstances, until re-enforced about 
3 130 p. m. by a portion of Granger's Reserve Corps, who took 
up the position that should have been occupied during the day 
by Negley's Division. 

General Negley, so far from holding my right as he had 
promised, retired, with extraordinary deliberation, to Ross- 
ville at an early period of the day, taking with him a portion 
of my division, as will be seen by the report of Colonel Connell, 
commanding First Brigade, and leaving me open to attack from 
the right as well as from the left and front (from which points 
the Rebels attacked me simultaneously on four several occa- 
sions), and my rear so far exposed, that my staff officers' sent 
back for ammunition, were successively cut off, and the am- 
munition of such vital importance at that time, prevented from 
reaching me, thus necessitating the use of the bayonet as my 
only means of defense. 

I remained in this position heavily engaged until sunset, 
re-enforced by the Ninth Indiana Infantry, sent me at my re- 
quest by General Hazen, and the Sixty-Eighth and One Hun- 
dred First Indiana Infantry, sent by order of General Thomas, 
also the Twenty-First Ohio Infantry, all of whom remained in 
position and behaved with steadiness while their ammunition 
lasted. Colonel Stoughton, with a portion of a brigade, also 
rallied at this point and did good service. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



259 



Finding my ammunition almost entirely exhausted, some 
of the troops having none at all, and the remainder but one or 
two rounds, I ordered it to be reserved until the last final ef- 
fort, and resort to the bayonet as a means of defense. Several 
charges were made by my entire command during the last 
attack of the enemy, by which they were gallantly driven from 
the ridge, where they had obtained a momentary lodgment. My 
entire force during the day and afternoon on this ridge could 
not have been over 2,500 men, including stragglers of various 
regiments and divisions, besides my own immediate command. 
Shortly after sunset I withdrew without molestation to Ross- 
ville where I bivouacked for the night, my retreat being covered 
by the Sixty-Eighth and One Hundred First Indiana Infantry, 
the only troops who had a supply of ammunition. This duty 
was satisfactorily performed by these regiments under the 
direction of Captain C. A. Cilley, of Colonel Van Derveer's 
staff. 

I cannot speak too highly of the gallant conduct of my 
command during these engagements. The accompanying re- 
port of killed and wounded is a sad but glorious record of 
stern devotion with which the officers and men of the Third 
Division maintained their stand in the desperate position as- 
signed them during the battle of the 19th and 20th. To the 
commanding officers of brigades, regiments and batteries the 
highest praise is due for the able and fearless manner in which 
they managed their commands in circumstances of more than 
ordinary trial. 

I herewith forward their several reports, to which I re- 



spectfully refer you for an account of the individual action of 
the different portions of my division, and I cheerfully indorse 
such special mention as is made of deserving members of my 
command. Where the conduct of all is so commendable it is 
hardly possible for me to select any for particular mention. 

The gallant Croxton, Fourth Kentucky Infantry, com- 
manding the Second Brigade, who, though severely and pain- 
fully wounded early the second day, remained on the field rally- 
ing and encouraging his men until utterly exhausted. * * * 

The opportune arrival of Major General Granger's com- 
mand, I consider, saved the army from total rout. Being left 
to my own resources by General Negley, whom I supposed to 
be on my right, I could not have held my position against 
another attack, had not General Granger's troops got into posi- 
tion to prevent my being flanked on my right. I am indebted 
to General Steedman for a small supply of ammunition, when 
I was depending solely on the bayonet for repulsing the next 
assault. 

The staff of my division: Captain Louis J. Lambert, As- 
sistant Adjutant General ; Captain George S. Roper, Commis- 
sary of Subsistence; Captain Lewis Johnson, Tenth Indiana 
Infantry, Provost Marshal ; Lieutenant Ira V. Germain, A. D. 
C, and Lieutenant Dunn, Tenth Kentucky Infantry, Topo- 
graphical Engineer (missing), performed their duties with 
fearlessness and great gallantry, carrying orders under severest 
fire, and using every effort to rally and encourage the troops 
to return to their flag when a panic had evidently seized many, 
particularly of other divisions. 



260 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Total number engaged, 5.998; loss during 19th and 20th — 
killed, 325; wounded, 1,639; missing, 210. Total 2,174. 
I am Colonel 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. M. Brannan, 
Brigadier General, Commanding Division. 

Lieut. Colonel George E. Flint, A. A. G. and Chief of 
Staff. Fourteenth Army Corps. 



Report of Colonel Charles W. Chapman, Seventy-Fourth 
Indiana Infantry, Commanding Second Brigade. 

Headquarters Second Brigade, Third Division. 

Chattanooga, Tenn., Sept. 27, 1863. 
Captain : — I submit the following report of the part taken 
by the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army 
Corps, on the 19th and 20th days of September, 1863 : 

On the night of the 18th inst. this brigade, with the bal- 
ance of the division. Colonel John T. Croxton, of the Fourth 
Kentucky Infantry, commanding, marched from Morgan's 
Ford, on the Chickamauga Creek, in Walker County, Ga., along 
the Chattanooga road, obliquing to the right where this road 
intersects with the road leading to Ringgold. The brigade was 
on the march all night of the 18th inst., arriving in the vicin- 
ity of the enemy about 6 o'clock in the morning of the 19th. 
After halting and taking a hasty cup of coffee, firing was heard 



in front ; the column was immediately on the march forward 
on the Ringgold Road. The colonel commanding was here in- 
formed that a brigade of the enemy had been cut off and was 
immediately in our from, supposed to be in the vicinity of the 
Chickamauga Creek. 

We advanced about 1 mile on this road (Ringgold) and 
formed line of battle in the woods, facing nearly east, the 
Seventy-Fourth Indiana on the right, Colonel C. W. Chapman 
commanding; the Fourth Kentucky, Lieut. Colonel P. B. Hunt 
commanding, on the left; the Tenth Indiana, Colonel William 
B. Carroll commanding, in the center, these three regiments 
forming the front line ; Fourteenth Ohio, Lieut. Colonel H. D. 
Kingsbury commanding ; Tenth Kentucky, Colonel William H. 
Hays commanding, forming the reserve. Skirmishers were 
thrown out in front, under command of Major J. H. Van Natta, 
of the Tenth Indiana. They advanced but a short distance 
when they were charged upon by the Rebel cavalry, supposed 
to be those under the command of Forrest. The skirmishers 
immediately returned to the line. The advance line gave them 
one volley, fixed bayonets and charged, which caused the enemy 
to "skedaddle" in haste, with considerable loss. The line of 
battle was immediately reformed, and skirmishers advanced 
again under the command of the same officer, who soon after 
was wounded and taken from the field. The skirmishers ad- 
vanced about 500 yards when they came in contact with the 
enemy's skirmishers. After considerable firing on both sides, 
a flank movement was discovered. The reserve regiments were 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



261 



at once brought forward, the Fourteenth Ohio on the right 
and the Tenth Kentucky on the left. 

I was here ordered by Colonel Croxton, commanding the 
brigade, to take command of the right wing, leaving Lieut. 
Colonel Baker in command of the Seventy-Fourth Indiana. An 
advance being ordered, the troops moved forward steadily and 
with a determination to drive the enemy from the field, but, 
instead of finding one brigade to contend with, we had the 
combined forces of Longstreet and Breckenridge. We suc- 
ceeded in checking them, but they soon recovered and being 
in force, they soon commenced flanking us on the right. We 
were compelled to fall back, which was done in good order. 

A new line of battle was formed on the right, and nearly 
at right angles with the first, for the purpose of meeting the 
flank movement being made by the enemy, and again advanced 
this line, driving the enemy before us a short distance. At this 
time, our ammunition being nearly exhausted, we fell back to 
a ridge and there held our position until we were relieved by 
King's Brigade, of General Baird's Division. The brigade then 
returned to the rear of the battery, (which had been ordered 
back about 300 yards, to take position on a ridge, commanding 
an open field in our rear, so if the enemy forced us back beyond 
it the battery could rake them with grape and canister), form- 
ing line of battle on the right and left of it and replenished the 
men with 60 rounds of ammunition. It was in this last charge 
(before we were relieved by King's Brigade) that we lost very 
heavily in officers and men. Colonel Carroll, Tenth Indiana, 
fell mortally wounded, and Lieut. Colonel P. B. Hunt was se- 



verely wounded in the leg. Both were, however, brought from 
the field. 

It soon became apparent that the enemy was driving King's 
Brigade. This brigade being again ordered to advance, moved 
by the flank to the right (in order that it might be unmasked 
by King's command) about 400 yards. The positions of the 
regiments were, viz: Fourteenth Ohio on the right; Fourth 
Kentucky on its left ; Seventy-Fourth Indiana on left of Fourth 
Kentucky; Tenth Indiana on left of Seventy-Fourth Indiana; 
the Tenth Kentucky on the left of the Tenth Indiana, and the 
Thirty-First Ohio, Lieut. Colonel Lister commanding, which 
had been ordered at the beginning of the action to our support, 
on the extreme left. I was directed by Colonel Croxton to 
take command of the right wing, he remaining on the left. 
The enemy was now approaching us en masse, of not less than 
three columns, and giving us a heavy fire of grape and can- 
ister. The order was given to charge, which was done in fine 
style, and with a determination to drive the enemy, which they 
did, some 300 yards, capturing their batteries of five guns 
and bringing them from the field. 

In this charge the left of the brigade retook seven pieces 
of artillery, five guns belonging to the Indiana Cavalry (Eight- 
eenth Indiana Battery), and two Parrotts of the First Michi- 
gan (Loomis) and brought them off the field. There was a 
desperate struggle for the ground, but, they being in such over- 
powering force, and flanking us again on the right, we were 
compelled to fall back, which we did in good order, and dis- 
puting every foot of ground until we came to a good position, 



262 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



which we held until relieved by Johnson's Division. In the 
last charge we again lost heavily, as the list of killed and 
wounded will show. It was in this charge that my horse was 
shot from under me, and fell heavily upon me, breaking my 
arm and injuring me seriously otherwise, but I continued on 
the field during the balance of the day. 

The brigade again retired to the crest of the hill and took 
position by the batter}', where we rested until about 4 o'clock 
when we were again ordered to march by the right flank, 
through the woods into a field across the Chattanooga road 
and then marched into line of battle south about 1 mile, to a 
hospital tent of the Seventy-Ninth Ohio. We remained there 
in line until dark, when we marched by the flank into an open 
field on our right and bivouacked for the night. 

During this day's engagement, Battery C, First Ohio Artil- 
lery, First Lieutenant M. B. Gary, had no opportunity of taking 
any part in the action, on account of the nature of the ground, 
but was always ready and willing to do so. During the day 
he had 2 men wounded. 

On the morning of the 20th, about 4 o'clock, we again 
marched out by the flank across the Chattanooga road at Kelly's 
House, leaving it to our left, and took position holding the 
front line. Skirmishers were thrown forward, but the enemy 
did not appear to confront us closely. We remained in this 
position about one hour. The brigade then moved to the left, 
by the flank about 300 yards and formed on the left of Rey- 
nolds' Division, the Seventy-Fourth and Tenth Indiana in the 
front line, and the Fourteenth Ohio, Fourth Kentucky and 



Tenth Kentucky in the rear. The front regiments threw up 
some rude fortifications, which protected them from the fire 
of the enemy, who came within 40 yards of them, but was 
each time driven back with great slaughter, when by a flank 
movement on our right, the brigade was compelled to change 
front, and in so doing the brigade become separated and at the 
same time Colonel Croxton was compelled to abandon the field. 
What remained of the brigade was under the command of 
Colonel William H. Hays, Tenth Kentucky, to whom I refer 
you for further report of second day's proceedings. The Sev- 
enty-fourth and Tenth Indiana, having reported to General 
Reynolds, fought with him during the day. The brigade lost 
heavily in killed and wounded. See reports of regimental com- 
manders, copies of which I herewith submit. 

The total number of casualties in the two days' fighting 
is : Officers killed 5 ; officers wounded 47 ; enlisted men killed 
126; wounded 681; captured or missing, officers 2; enlisted 
men yj. Total loss 938. 

The effective force of the brigade was on the day of bat- 
tle : Officers 115. Enlisted men 2164. Battery, officers 4, en- 
listed men 118, aggregate 2401. 

Before closing this report, I must testify to the manner 
in which the officers of the brigade conducted themeslves on 
the trying occasion of each day, and I refrain from particu- 
larizing individual instances of heroic daring and gallantry, 
for where all do their duty bravely and well as the officers of 
this brigade did on this occasion, it would be unjust and im- 
proper to make distinctions and institute comparisons by which 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



263 



others equally deserving and meritorious would be injured. 
I have the honor to be captain, 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 
C. W. Chapman, 
Capt. Louis J. Lambert, Col. Commanding 2nd Brigade 

Assistant Adjutant General, Third Division. 

I copy below a portion of the official report of Lieut. Col- 
onel Myron Baker, Seventy-fourth Indiana which confirms the 
statement that the Tenth and Seventy-fouth Indiana were the 
last regiments off of the field on the night of the 20th, also 
that Colonel Marsh B. Taylor had command of the two regi- 
ments : 

Headquarters Seventy- fourth Indiana, 
2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps 
Chattanooga, September 25, 1863. 
Sir: 

"About 8 A. M. the Seventy-fourth Indiana with the Tenth 
Indiana on its immediate right moved to the left and joined on 
the Seventy-fifth Indiana, the right regiment of Reynolds' 
Division. The skirmishers moved to the left at the same time 
covering our front. The Seventy-fourth Indiana occupied a 
low ridge of ground with an open field in front fin which 
were some scattered trees) on the extreme left of the second 
brigade. On the brow of this ridge I caused the men to con- 
struct a rude breastworks of logs and rails behind which they 
could take shelter from the enemy's musketry and which proved 
of very great advantage in the subsequent fight. At about 



10:30 A. M. the firing which had been very heavy to my left 
and along the line of Reynolds' Division, struck my line of bat- 
tle. I ordered the men to kneel down behind their works and 
hold their fire until the enemy were within sixty to seventy 
yards of our line. The companies of skirmishers were soon 
driven in, but not a shot was fired by us until the Rebels who 
were charging on us with a yell had come within seventy yards 
of us when I ordered the men to rise up and commence firing. 
The men mostly aimed deliberately and fought with a spirit 
and determination which could not well be surpassed, for the 
comparative security and strength of their position, gave 
them increased confidence. 

"The Tenth and Seventy-fourth Indiana held their position, 
keeping up an incessant and untiring fire until their ammuni- 
tion was nearly exhausted, when they were ordered to cease 
firing, fix bayonets, and await the nearer approach of the foe. 
Twice during this engagement the enemy was thrown into con- 
fusion and driven back from before our position. About this 
time the line to the right of the Tenth Indiana gave way, and 
the Rebels made their appearance in an open field on the right 
flank of the Tenth Indiana. Lieut. Colonel Marsh B. Taylor, 
commanding that veteran regiment, changed his front almost 
perpendicularly to the rear, and the Seventy-fourth Indiana 
protected the original line until he had completed that move- 
ment, when I faced the regiment by the rear rank and formed 
line of battle on his right at an acute angle with the original 
line, and in rear of a fence and some old log buildings. Here 
the regiment fought until its ammunition was completely ex- 



264 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



hausted and the Rebels were driven back from the open field 
over which they were advancing. 

"At this time the Tenth and Seventy- fourth Indiana were 
separated from the rest of the brigade, which had been sent 
to the right to fill a breach in the line, and Lieutenant Colonel 
Taylor, being the ranking officer, took command of both regi- 
ments. The regiment now moved through the woods toward 
the left, and awaited the arrival of ammunition in an open 
ground where Hazen's Brigade was lying behind some log 
fortifications. 

"About 4 P. M. we got a supply of ammunition and occu- 
pied a position behind the breastworks, from which Hazen's 
Brigade had been withdrawn. When the retreat commenced 
in the evening we were the last to leave that part of the field, 



and brought away with us one section of artillery which was 
in rear of all the infantry, except the Tenth and Seventy-fourth 
Indiana. Those regiments both left that part of the field in 
good order under a severe artillery fire from the enemy, and 
halted and formed line of battle facing the enemy on a hill 
where General Steedma'n's Division had been fighting. The 
Tenth and Seventy-fourth Indiana zvere the last organised 
bodies of infantry that left the ground. 

About 8:30 P. M. the two regiments moved from that 
point toward Rossville by the right flank, the Seventy-fourth 
Indiana in front, followed by the Tenth Indiana." 

2p $L '3(1 $fc . $£ %. 1p % % 1fi 

Myron C. Baker, 
Lieut. Colonel Commanding 74th Indiana Infantry. 



CHAPTER XI 



Siege of Chattanooga 



vIIE battle of Chickamauga was considered by man)' as a 
1 drawn battle. The enemy occupied the field, it is true, 



^P 



but the main object Bragg had in view had failed, to- 
wit : The complete annihilation or destruction of the Army 
of the Cumberland. The simple occupation of the battle field 
was all the "rebs" could claim as a victory. Bragg was most 
severely punished, his army was crippled, his losses in killed, 
wounded and prisoners exceeded that of the Union Army. 

It has been conceded by some of the best military men 
on both sides that Bragg's plan of the battle was the best 
arranged of any battle during the war. The failure of Bragg 
to accomplish what he had planned was through the interven- 
tion of Divine Providence. Bragg's subordinate generals 
failed to carry out, or rather disobeyed his orders. Lieutenant 
General Polk, commanding Bragg's right wing, was ordered 
to hurl his entire force against Rosecrans' left at 6 o'clock on 
the morning of September 19. This he failed to do and did 
not attack until 10 o'clock, and with only one or two brigades 
at a time. This force was repulsed and suffered heavy loss 
without any gain. Had Polk obeyed the order to the letter 
there is no telling what would have become of the Army of 
the Cumberland. The Third and Fourth Divisions of the 



Fourteenth Corps was all the troops directly in his front, com- 
manded by Brannan and Reynolds, respectively. 

What the trouble or disagreement was between Bragg 
and his subordinate general we do not know. But after the 
battle Polk, D. H. Hill and Hindman were relieved of their 
commands and ordered to report at Atlanta for court of in- 
quiry. It is interesting reading, the correspondence of these 
men, between Bragg and Jeff Davis. It was evident that 
Davis did not like Bragg from some cause, as Bragg's orders 
to the generals "in hoc" were subsequently countermanded by 
Davis, the men released from arrest and assigned to other 
commands. 

The Army of the Cumberland arrived in Chattanooga on 
Monday night, September 21st. They immediately proceeded 
to throw up strong intrenchments, the line extending from the 
Tennessee River on the left to the base of Lookout Mountain 
on the right. Bragg having been so badly crippled did not make 
his appearance until Sept. 24th, when he proceeded to invest the 
city. He at once occupied Lookout Mountain on our right, 
Missionary Ridge to our left, and the valley between. There 
were no bridges across the Tennessee River north of Chatta- 
nooga at that time and this prevented any further retreat of 



266 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



the Arm}' of the Cumberland, which, by the way, had no idea 
of going any farther. If Bragg saw fit to attack it would 
have been a fight to the finish, with the odds in favor of the 
Army of the Cumberland. Bragg realized this fact and was 
content to settle down to a long rest. 

Rosecrans' original orders were to take Chattanooga and 
hold it, but subsequent telegrams from Washington were to 
the effect that "Bragg was on the retreat, Atlanta being his 
objective point, and for him (Rosecrans) to follow him." 
While the fact was that Bragg had simply evacuated Chatta- 
nooga, falling back as far as LaFayette, Ga. (22 miles), and 
waiting for Rosecrans to follow him in the valley and then 
with the combined force of himself and Longstreet to destroy 
the Army of the Cumberland — the battle of Chickamauga 
being the result. 

On September 25th pontoon bridges were thrown across 
the Tennessee River on the north, enabling supply trains to 
cross the river and go for supplies. Field hospitals were im- 
mediately established on the north side of the river in the 
valley between the river and Walden's Ridge. Alll sick and 
wounded, whom it was possible to move, were at once trans- 
ferred to the field hospitals for two reasons, first, to clear the 
city of all such incumbrances in the event of an attack, and 
second, the sick and wounded would fare much better in tents 
than in buildings, wtiich would insure a speedy recovery; more 
room, with plenty of fresh air, would have a more beneficial 
effect. As fast as the wounded were able to travel they were 



loaded in ambulances and taken to Stevenson, Ala., and sent 
north, either general hospitals at Louisville and Nashville or 
furloughed home. 

The work of strengthening the fortifications progressed 
rapidly and by the 24th of September the defenses of the city 
were perfect, and the army felt confident it could repulse any 
attack of Bragg's whole army. Our division (Third, Four- 
teenth Corps) occupied the left of the corps, the right of out- 
regiment resting on the Rossville road, the remainder of the 
brigade extending to the left. 

September 26th Bragg opened up the bombardment with 
all his artillery, the bombardment lasting three or four hours. 
His object evidently was to ascertain the location of our bat- 
teries, and wtiile he was gaining this information, we were 
equally well informed as to the position of his troops, espe- 
cially his artillery. The terrific cannonading did little if any 
damage. 

On Lookout Mountain, some 2,800 feet above the level 
of the Tennessee River, Bragg had located two batteries, one 
of 64-pounders and one of 32-pounder guns. These batteries 
would manage to open up about once every twenty-four hours, 
aiming to shell the city. They did no execution, but fur- 
nished the boys with an exhibition of fireworks. The fuse 
from the shell would leave a trail of fire mucTi like that from 
a sky rocket, and when the shell bursted it resembled the 
rocket bursting in the air. The fusilade was kept up some six 
weeks, the result being one man killed and one wounded. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



267 



At the north end of Lookout Mountain the Tennessee 
River makes a bend, running a short distance west, where it 
turns and runs north. In this bend was an island about too 
feet high called Moccasin Point. On this point was stationed 
the Tenth Indiana Batter}'. After the battery had been 
placed they opened fire on the two Rebel forts on Lookout. 
Notwithstanding the distance, our batteries succeeded in dis- 
mounting several of the Rebel guns. In our front was a 
strong force of Rebels who had planted a 32-poun i der gun, 
which the boys called the "Swamp Angel." This gun gave us 
some annoyance, but was generally silenced by the Seventh 
Indiana Batter}' which manned Fort Negley. The artillery 
duels between- these batteries were frequent, and in a short 
time the "Swamp Angel" was effectually silenced. 

In the course of two weeks both armies quieted down, 
with occasional skirmishes between the two picket lines. Chat- 
tanooga soon began to liven up and in a short time everything 
was hurry and bustle. Rations were beginning to disappear 
and some movement had to be made to replenish the haver- 
sack. After considerable work, and under skirmish fire, we 
succeeded in getting a steamboat loaded with supplies, which 
was meagre in quantity by reason of the boat being a small 
"stern wheeler." The greater part of these supplies went to 
the sick and wounded. Thirty days after the siege began our 
rations were growing scarcer. Parched corn was a luxury and 
teamsters had to guard the feed boxes, or horses and mules 
would have been without corn. Notwithstanding all these 



hardships, the men were cheerful and confident when the time 
arrived Bragg would be the worst whipped man in the South- 
ern Confederacy. Our cracker line was about fifty miles long, 
over hills and mountains to Stevenson and Bridgeport, Ala. 
The trains had to be heavily guarded and protected from the 
Rebel cavalry, under Joe Wheeler, Wharton and Van Dorn. 
Teamsters starting out with six mules generally returned with 
four and sometimes less. Forage was scarce, horses and mules 
died on the road, and it was estimated that during the siege 
the government lost 7,000 horses and mules from starvation. 
The situation was in reality growing desperate. 

On the 28th of September the reorganization of the army 
took place. The following general order explains itself : 



General Order 
No. 322 



Office of Adjutant General, 
War Department, 
Washington, Sept. 28, 1863. 



I. The President of the United States directs that the 
Twentieth and Twenty-First Army Corps be consolidated and 
called the Fourth Army Corps, and that Major General Gor- 
don Granger be fhe commander of this consolidated corps. 

II. It is also directed that a court of inquiry be con- 
vened, the detail to be hereafter made, to inquire and report 
upon the conduct of Major Generals McCook and Crittenden 
in the battles of 19th and 20th instant. These officers are re- 
lieved from duty in the Department of the Cumberland and 



268 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



will repair to Indianapolis, Indiana, reporting their arrival by 
letter to the Adjutant General of the army. 

By Order of the Secretary of War. 
E. D. TownsEnd, 
Assistant Adjutant General. 

At the same time a change took place in our division. 
General Brannan, who commanded us at Chickamauga, had 
been transferred to the Twentieth Corps as Chief of Artillery, 
and Brigadier General Absalom Baird assigned to the com- 
mand of our division (Third, Fourteenth Corps). Our 
brigade was changed from the Second to the Third and the 
Third Brigade to the Second, and under this number (Third) 
we served until final muster out. 

October I, 1863, a meeting was called of the regimental 
officers at regimental headquarters to take action on the deaths 
of Colonel Carroll and Lieutenant Jones of Company A. The 
following resolutions were unanimously adopted : 

Tribute of Respect to Colonee Carroel. 

At a meeting of the officers of the Tenth Regiment, Indi- 
ana Volunteer Infantry, at Chattanooga, Tenn., the following 
preamble and resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas, In the dispensation of Providence it has been 
the sad fate of Colonel William B. Carroll and Lieutenant 
Martin T. Jones to be numbered among the fallen brave, who 
gave their lives to their country on the bloody field of Chicka- 
mauga; therefore, 



Resolved, That we, the officers of the Tenth Indiana Vol- 
unteers, having been associated with Colonel Carroll in a 
weary, toilsome and dangerous campaign of two years in the 
field, first as Captain of Company E, then as Major, then as 
Lieutenant Colonel, and finally as Colonel and commanding 
officer of our regiment, do unite in expressing our sincere and 
heartfelt regrets that one so brave, so gallant, so competent 
and generous, should be so suddenly called from our midst, 
where by his nobleness, generosity and kindness he has en- 
deared himself and his memory to every heart. 

Resolved, That in the untimely death of Colonel Carroll 
we deplore the loss of a good and efficient commander, the 
government a meritorious officer, and the country an esteemed 
citizen and true patriot. 

Resolved, That in the fall of Lieutenant Jones, of Com- 
pany A, another good and brave officer has passed from among 
us, one whose intercourse with us has always been of the most 
pleasant and agreeable character, and one who will always be 
remembered by us as an officer who did his whole duty to his 
country, and shed his blood in defense of the great principles 
for which we fight. 

Resolved, That we unite in tendering our heartfelt sym- 
pathies to Mrs. Carroll, and the bereaved relations and friends 
of Colonel Carroll and Lieutenant Jones and of all the brave 
men who have fallen in our regiment. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



269 



Resolved, That all the papers of the Eighth Congressional 
District be requested to publish these proceedings. 

Lieut. Col. M. B. Taylor, 
Adjutant William E. Ludlow, President. 

Secretary. 

Resolutions of Respect for Captain Samuel H. Shortle. 
Chattanooga, Term., Oct. 27, 1863. 

At a meeting of the non-commissioned officers and pri- 
vates of Company K, Tenth Regiment, Indiana Infantry, the 
following resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas, •It has pleased God in His infinite wisdom to 
take from our midst Captain Samuel H. Shortle, who died at 
his home on the 13th instant ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That in the death of Captain Shortle we are 
called upon to mourn the loss of one we loved, one who has 
stood at the head of our company, in camp, in the field, and 
in battle, during our arduous and varied campaigns of two 
years, one whose associations with us as our immediate com- 
mander has always been of a pleasant and agreeable nature 
and one whose courage, generosity, manhood and nobleness of 
character, no one who knew him as we knew him could but 
admire. 

Resolved, That the friends and relatives of Captain 
Shortle have our heartfelt sympathies in their sad bereave- 
ment. 



Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the 
parents of the deceased, and that the editors of the Frankfort 
Crescent be requested to give it publication. 

James Gibbons, 
Eli T. Michael, President. 

Secretary. 

Captain Shortle was an exceptionally brave and gallant 
officer, was in the thickest of the fight at Mill Springs and 
Chickamauga. He was a polished gentleman, a congenial com- 
panion, and a fine musician. Had a splendid voice and many 
times the writer has enjoyed hours singing the old familiar 
songs and hymns of the "long ago." He was considerate of 
his men and gave personal attention to their wants and saw 
that they were fully equipped and had their full share of ra- 
tions. He was one of the officers who always said "follow me, 
men," instead of "go, boys." Plis loss was mourned by the 
regiment which sympathized with his company in being de- 
prived of a brave and gallant officer. "Peace to his ashes." 

On the 16th of October, 1863, General Rosecrans was 
relieved of command as per the following general orders : 



"General Order 

No. 1 



1 



Headquarters, 
Division of the Mississippi, 
Louisville, Ky., Oct. 18, 1863. 
Major General Rosecrans having been relieved from the 
command of the Department of the Cumberland by direction 
of the President of the United States, per General Orders 



270 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



No. 337, October iC, 1863, Major General George H. Thomas 
is hereby assigned to the command and will at once assume 
its dirties. General Rosecrans will turn over all books, pa- 
pers, maps and other property pertaining to the command to 
Major General Thomas. All staff officers except the aides- 
de-camp authorized by law now on duty with General Rose- 
crans, will report to General Thomas for assignment as soon 
as relieved. General Rosecrans will proceed to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and report to the Adjutant General of the army by 
letter for orders. 

By Order of Major General Grant. 

Ely S. Parker. 
Assistant Adjutant General." 

Following this order was one issued by General Rose- 
crans, bidding farewell to the army, as follows : 

"General Orders ) Headquarters, 

No. 242 J Department of the Cumberland, 

Chattanooga, Term., Oct. 19, 1863. 

The general commanding announces to the officers and 
soldiers of the Army of the Cumberland that he leaves them 
under orders from the President. Major General George H. 
Thomas, in compliance with orders, will assume the command 
of this army and department. The chiefs of all the staff de- 
partments will report to him for orders. 

In taking leave of you, his brothers in arms, officers and 
soldiers, he congratulates you that your new commander 



comes to you, not as he did — a stranger. General Thomas 
has been identified with this army from its first organization. 
He has led you often in battle. To his known prudence, 
dauntless courage, and true patriotism you may look with 
confidence, that under God he will lead you to victory. 

The general commanding doubts not you will be as true 
to yourselves and your country in the future as you have been 
in the past. 

To the division and brigade commanders he tenders his 
cordial thanks for their valuable aid, and hearty co-operation 
in all he has undertaken. To the chief of staff departments, 
and their subordinates whom he leaves behind, he owes a 
debt of gratitude for their fidelity and untiring devotion to 
duty. 

Companions in arms, officers and soldiers, farewell and' 
may God bless you. 

W. S. Rosecrans, 

Major General."' 

The feeling in the army on the retirement of General 
Rosecrans was one of deep sorrow and regret. They felt 
that he had been mistreated by the authorities at Washington, 
and subjected to many indignites, by Stanton and others. He 
had moved in the valley against his better judgment and the 
judgment of General Thomas. His move in the valley was 
made by reason of peremptory orders from the War De- 
partment, who, being in Washington, knew -more about the 
condition of affairs than the generals who were in the field. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



27T 



He was ordered to pursue Bragg, whom Halleck said was on 
the retreat headed for Altlanta. 

The War Department seemed to be ignorant of the fact 
that Bragg was being reinforced by Longstreet's Corps from 
Lee's army. General Thomas knew and so reported to Rose- 
crans that Bragg was not retreating, but was planning to 
destroy the Army of the Cumberland, and subsequent events 
proved that General Thomas was correct in his surmises. 

It was evidently a mistake on the part of General Rose- 
crans leaving the field at 3 o'clock on the afternoon of the 
20th and going to Chattanooga. McCook and Crittenden fol- 
lowed suit, leaving Thomas and the Fourteenth Corps to fight 
it out. Thomas knew nothing of this until 4 o'clock p. m., 
when he received an order from Rosecrans to assume com- 
mand of the army. Thomas, of course, expected McCook 
and Crittenden to report to him and mass his forces. But 
neither of them reported and, in fact, no one knew what had 
become of the troops. Negley in the meantime withdrew to 
Rossville, taking the First Brigade of our division with him, 
but Colonel Connell finding out what had been done marched 
back and rejoined the division. 

General Grant after assuming command came to Chatta- 
nooga and began preparations for raising the siege, and dur- 
ing that time nothing of very great importance transpired 
until November 23, 1863, of which we will note in the fol- 
lowing chapter. 



November 15, 1863, Captain J. W. Perkins was field 
officer of the day, and after dark when on a tour of inspec- 
tion of the line was shot by a member of the Second Minne- 
sota on guard at General Thomas' headquarters. The ball 
entered a little to the right of the spinal column, going around 
the right side and lodged in the abdominal cavity. He was 
brought to camp, and everything that medical skill' could sug- 
gest or loving hands could do to alleviate his sufferings was 
done. He suffered untold agonies and at 4 o'clock on the morn- 
ing of the 1 6th death relieved him of his sufferings. His death 
cast a gloom over the regiment, especially Co. I, of which he 
was captain. Private Finney of his company was similarly 
wounded in the skirmish with Morgan at Beech Fork, De- 
cember 28, 1862. Their wounds were identical, their suffer- 
ings the same, death following in each instance — a singular 
coincidence. 

The death of Captain Perkins was mourned by the regi- 
ment, and especially Company I. He was brave and cour- 
ageous, even to recklessness, and after going through all the 
battles in which the regiment participated — especially Chick- 
amauga, in which he served as acting major — in the thickest 
of the fight to be shot by one of our own men of the same 
division, made his death particularly sorrowful. A meeting 
was held at regimental headquarters, at which the following 
resolutions were adopted : 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Resolutions of Respect to the Late Captain Perkins. 

At a meeting of the officers of the Tenth Regiment, 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, the following preamble and reso- 
lutions were adopted : 

Whereas, It has been the will of Divine Providence to 
take from our midst Captain Jehu W. Perkins, one of the 
brightest stars of the Tenth Indiana, and hero of many a 
hard fought battle; therefore. 

Resolved, That we, the officers of the regiment, do unite 
in expressing our sincere regrets that one so brave, gallant 
and generous should so suddenly be torn from us — after hav- 
ing passed through the sanguinary battles of Mill Springs 
and Chickamauga, where for gallant and meritorious conduct 
at the former he was brevetted major by the President. 

Resolved, That in our associations with Captain Perkins 
we have found in him an efficient and meritorious officer and 
who by his kindness and generosity has endeared his memory 
to every heart. 

Resolved, That we tender our heartfelt sympathies to the 
relatives and friends of Captain Perkins, and hope that they, 
like us, will find solace by knowing that he died a true patriot 
and soldier. 

Resolved, That the foregoing preamble and resolutions 
be published in the Lebanon Patriot, Frankfort Crescent and 



LaFayette Courier — and that a copy of these resolutions be 
furnished his father at Lebanon. 

Capt. James H. Boyle, 
Capt. Thomas A. Cobb, 
Capt. Felix Shumate. 
Lieut. A. W. Smith, Committee. 

Secretary. 

Preparations for raising the siege progressed rapidly. A 
battery of 100 pounder Parrott guns was planted on Cameron 
Hill, on west side of Chattanooga, and it was expected these 
guns with its heavy ordnance shells and shot would work 
fearful execution, but from some cause they were never used. 

November 22. Sherman and the Fifteenth Army Corps 
arrived at Chattanooga. Sherman reported to Grant, and 
stated "You are besieged," to which Grant replied, "I am 
aware of the fact, but won't be many more days." 

November 23. We were ordered to hold ourselves in 
readiness to move at a moment's notice with 100 rounds of 
ammunition and four days' rations in the haversacks. This 
order indicated that there would be "something doing" in a 
very short time. Our division formed in front of Fort Neg- 
ley, with the First and Second Brigades in front and our 
brigade (Third) in reserve. 

The Fourth Corps had moved out and formed a line in 
front of Orchard Knob, one division of the Eleventh Corps 
with them. Sherman in the meantime had gone north of the 
Tennessee River with two divisions of the Fifteenth Corps 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



273 



and First Division (Davis) of the Fourteenth Corps, crossed 
the river, captured all the Rebel pickets excepting one and 
soon had his troops in position to attack the Rebel right wing. 
The Fourth Corps made an attack and with heavy 
skirmishing in our front the Fourth Corps drove the enemy 
from Orchard Knob, and holding that position our division 
remained in their position all night and on the following 
morning (24th) we moved to the left, occupying a position 
in front of Bragg's headquarters. The 24th was rainy and 
very cloud)'. Hooker advanced on Lookout Mountain, al- 
though we could hear the fighting we could see nothing by 
reason of the clouds between us and the mountain. The Sec- 
ond Division of our corps (Fourteenth) occupied a position 
on Chattanooga Creek, at the base of Lookout, and the whole 
line engaged the enemy to keep him from sending reinforce- 
ments to oppose Hooker. About 3 o'clock in the afternoon the 
clouds cleared away just long enough for us to see Hooker 
on his white horse coming over the mountain, driving every- 
thing before him. After that we saw nothing more of him 
or his army, but could hear the continuous rattle of musketry 
and roar of artillery. We could tell from the cheers every 
time our forces were charging the enemy. The fighting lasted 
until after midnight. 

November 25th opened bright and clear, our flag un- 
furled and waving from the top of Lookout Mountain. The 
entire Rebel force had been routed, "horse, foot and 
dragoons." The air was cold and crispy, a thin sheet of ice 



covered the ground from the rains of the previous day. About 
10 o'clock the Army of the Cumberland began forming their 
lines previous to making the assault on Mission Ridge. For 
some reason, unknown, our division was ordered to the left 
of the Fourteenth Corps, or extreme left of the Army of the 
Cumberland. It had been previously arranged that a signal 
of six guns fired from Fort Wood would be given when the 
army was to be in readiness to make the charge. When the 
sixth round was fired the army was to start. 

At one o'clock the fort opened and at the last shot the 
charge began. The orders were to take the first line of works 
or rifle pits and then rest. The enemy opened up with all his 
artillery. The firing was terrific, and in order to shield them- 
selves from this terrible cannonading the regiment double 
quicked and at the point of the bayonet drove the Rebels from 
their works. At this point they were so nearly under the Rebel 
guns that they failed to do any execution, as they could not 
depress their guns sufficiently without dismounting them. 

After a short rest a color bearer on the extreme right made 
the remark: "What's the use of staying here? Come on, boys," 
and he started, regiment after regiment following. Brigade and 
division commanders supposed orders 'had been given to con- 
tinue the charge and acted accordingly. Generals Grant, Thom- 
as and Joe Reynolds occupied a commanding position on Or- 
chard Knob, where they could observe the movements of the 
entire army from right to left. Grant was amazed. He turned 
to Thomas and asked: "By whose order was that charge giv- 
en ?" Thomas replied : "I don't know ; not by my order, how- 



2/4 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



ever." Grant then said : "If that charge fails, stars will fall." 
Meaning of course, brigadier and major generals would lose 
their stars. General Thomas told him: "The charge will not 
fail, I know those men." Generals Thomas and Reynolds 
chuckled with delight but said nothing while Grant was move- 
less, chagrined, as it was his wish that Sherman have all the 
honors of success. Steadily the long line of blue ascended the 
ridge, pausing occasional}' to rest and get "second wind." The 
musketry fire from the enemy was terrific, the ridge very 
rough and steep. Our division on the left began the ascent in 
a V shaped ravine facing their batteries. A battery on the left 
enfilading us and doing some execution. The First Brigade 
was on the right and the Second Brigade on the left, our bri- 
gade being in reserve. When within a hundred yards of the 
top of the ridge our brigade moved to the left of the line, 
charged bayonets and drove the enemy in front of them. When 
nearly at the top Colonel Phelps (Thirty-eighth Ohio) com- 
manding the brigade was shot and killed by a Rebel. 

The enemy fell back a short distance and made a stand 
but our regiment charged them with the bayonet and drove 
them from the field. 

As the sun was setting behind the hills west of Chatta- 
nooga the camp fires of the Union were burning brightly on 
top of Missionary Ridge — Chickamauga had been revenged ; 
Bragg was defeated and his defeat was turned into a rout. His 
loss was heavy in killed and wounded, with some 5000 pris- 
oners and 72 guns. His men threw away muskets and accou- 
trements, in their haste to get away. Wagons, horses and 



mules were deserted, in fact his men were more or less panic 
stricken. Pursuit was given until darkness ended it. 

On the morning of November 26, we were ordered to 
join in the pursuit, following Bragg to Ringgold, where we 
tore up three miles of railroad, burning ties, heating the rails 
red hot and bending them around trees and allowing them to 
cool. The rails were useless for any future service. 

We returned from Ringgold November 29th and again 
settled down to prepare winter quarters. The following re- 
ports give definitely the part taken by the regiment at the Battle 
of Mission Ridge: 

The siege had been raised, the railroad from Bridgeport 
to Chattanooga was fast being completed, and in a few days 
a train loaded with supplies was on its way. As the train 
rounded the curve at the foot of Lookout Mountain the en- 
gineer whistled for the station. This was answered by cheers 
from the entire army and the men began a rush to the depot 
as the train pulled into the station and stopped. The engineer, 
fireman, conductor and brakemen were grabbed by the men 
and nearly hugged to death. The quartermaster general of 
the Army of the Cumberland was on hand to receive the train. 
No detail was necessary to unload the cars. The boys unfast- 
ened the car doors, opened them, climbed in and began "passing 
out." Those on the platform carried the stuff and piled it up 
in the depot. Within the short space of forty-five minutes the 
train of 20 cars was emptied. Occasionally one of the boys 
would "accidentally" drop a box of hard tack which would 
burst open. It only took two minutes to clean it up, but it 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



275 



disappeared in the haversacks. Hard tack treated in that man- 
ner never found itself hack in the boxes. Trains began to 
arrive at short intervals and soon became monotonous, and 
regular details had to be made to unload trains. In the course 
of two weeks the army had an abundance of rations and other 
necessary supplies. 

December 15, 1863, General Grant decided to visit the 
battlefield of Chickamauga. General Thomas accompanied him 
and an escort of infantry consisting of the Thirty-first Ohio, 
First Brigade, Ninth Ohio, Second Brigade and Tenth Indiana, 
Third Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, a 
squadron of ca'valry and a section of Battery C, First Ohio 
Light Artillery, of the Third Brigade. We left Chattanooga 
about 7 o'clock in the morning, passing through Rossville and 
arrived at Chickamauga about 1 1 o'clock a. m. The escort 
stacked arms and was permitted to wander over the field, but 
within easy distance of their arms. The members of our regi- 
ment were anxious to find the spot where we stacked knap- 
sacks on the morning of the 19th. We easily found the spot 
and were positive as to its location, as the boys found envelopes 
of letters they had left in them. Everything of course was 
taken by the "rebs" except old envelopes. Photographs of 
wives, mothers, children and "the best girl" were duly ap- 
propriated by the "Johnnies." On one log we counted twenty- 
seven skulls that had been placed in a row. Heavy rains had 



swollen the creeks and many of those buried on the battlefield 
had been washed out, and one case in particular, a skeleton 
was hanging by one foot in the forks of a sapling some fifteen 
feet above the ground, head down. This was evidently the 
work of some of the enemy, as the water could never have 
reached that high. There were hundreds of instances show- 
ing irreverent treatment of the dead. We went to the line 
occupied by the regiment on Sunday (20th) morning and found 
the same logs lying in position which had been used for breast- 
works. In looking over the ground we found where Jim God- 
man and Bill Holton, of Company D, were buried. Identified 
ithern by a letter written by Holton to his mother on the night 
of the 19th; both were buried side by side, but the flesh had 
all disappeared. We went to the place where Col. Marsh B. 
Taylor "cut out" on Sunday afternoon, found the remains of 
James Rodgers of Company A. He with four or five others had 
evidently crawled to a spot to protect them from the sun, and 
had obtained a rail which was used as a pillow. In this po- 
sition they (6) died but were never buried — probably over- 
looked by the burying squad. 

Generals Grant and Thomas rode over the field together. 
General Thomas explained the position of all troops during 
the engagement. About 3 o'clock in the afternoon the bugle 
sounded the assembly. We "fell in" and leisurely marched back 
to Chattanooga, arriving there about dark. 



276 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Report of Lieut. Coeonee Marsh B. Tayeor. 
Tenth Indiana Infantry. 

Chattanooga, Term., December 1, 1863. 

Sir : — I have the honor of making herewith my official 
report of the late battle. 

On the morning of the 23rd of November, 1863, I re- 
ceived orders to hold my command in readiness to move at a 
moment's notice, with two days' rations and 100 rounds of 
cartridges to the man. About 4 p. m. I joined the brigade in 
front of Fort Negley, and closed en masse, my position being 
in reserve with the Fourteenth Ohio, the Tenth Kentucky, 
Fourth Kentucky, Thirty-eighth Ohio and Seventy-fourth In- 
diana being in the advance. We remained in this position until 
the morning of the 24th when the brigade was ordered to the 
left and front. After forming our line of battle, pickets were 
posted and remained until relieved on the morning of the 25th. 
Immediately the four left companies were ordered out as 
skirmishers, but were soon withdrawn. We were then or- 
dered to the left next to the river and marching and counter- 
marching we were formed in line of battle about 2 p. m., my 
regiment being in reserve of the brigade with the Fourteenth 
Ohio. After remaining in this position about two hours, we 
were ordered forward to storm the ridge, and in so doing 
were exposed to a raking fire from commanding positions on 
the top of the ridge. We succeeded in taking the ridge. My 
command lost 11 wounded. We remained in this position 
until next morning, November 26, when we were ordered to 



Ringgold, Ga. The officers and men of the regiment behaved 
with great gallantry. Hoping this report will meet with your 
approbation, I am very respectfully, 

Marsh B. Taylor. 
Lieut. Col. Commanding 10th Indiana. 



Report of Coeonel Wieeiam H. Hays, Tenth Kentucky. 
Commanding Third Brigade. 

Headquarters 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 14th Corps. 
Chattanooga, Tenn., Dec. 3, 1863. 

Captain. — I have the honor to submit the following report 
of the part taken by the Third Brigade, Third Division, Four- 
teenth Army Corps in the late engagement. 

Owing to the death of Colonel E. H. Phelps, wdio com- 
manded this brigade until evening of the 25th of November, 
and was killed while gallantly leading the brigade on the last 
charge to take Missionary Ridge, my report will necessarily 
be but a brief outline of the movements of the brigade up to 
that time. 

November 23 at 3 p. m., the brigade was ordered out to 
act as a reserve to the First and Second Brigade of this divi- 
sion, who were posted about three-quarters of a mile in front 
of Fort Negley, and near the enemy's picket line. This Bri- 
gade was posted near the center 200 yards in rear of the First 
and Second Brigade, where it remained until 3 a. m. Nov. 24th, 
when we were moved to the left of the LaFayette road and 
advanced near the enemy's lines, where, after posting a strong 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



277 



picket, we were ordered to intrench our positions, which was 
done very effectually during the night and lay 9 o'clock the 
next day our position was very secure behind a strong line 
of breastworks. We remained in this position until 10 a. m. 
November 25th, when we were ordered to move to the left. 
After moving in that direction about 4 miles up the river, we 
were faced about and marched back one mile. We then halted 
and after a few minutes, were moved to the front across a 
small stream and the railroad, and took up a position on the 
left of the division, one-quarter of a mile from the enemy's 
works at the foot of Missionary Ridge. 

Here a strong skirmish line was thrown to the front and 
left flank, the- Second Brigade being on our right. The regi- 
ments of this brigade were posted as follows : Tenth Ken- 
tucky, Fourth Kentucky, Seventy-fourth Indiana and Thirty- 
eighth Ohio in the front line ; Tenth Indiana and Fourteenth 
Ohio in the rear line as a reserve, two companies of the Thirty- 
eighth Ohio on the left as skirmishers to protect our left flank, 
as there were no troops connected with the brigade on the left. 
We lay in this position for about one-half hour, when we were 
ordered to advance, which we did for about 100 yards at quick 
time, when we were ordered to double quick to gain the Rebel 
works from which our skirmishers had driven the enemy. 
During the time were were passing the open space between 
the woods and the enemy's works, and while we were lying 
on the ground at their works, we were exposed to a heavy 
flanking fire of artillery from the top of Missionary Ridge. 
We however, maintained our position for ten or fifteen min- 



utes, when we were ordered to charge the ridge which we did 
in double quick, but the hill being very steep and rough, a 
great many of the men gave out before they reached the top, 
but they all succeeded in getting up in good time. On reaching 
the top we found the enemy in line twenty-five or thirty yards 
to our left, who delivered a murderous fire on our men as 
they ascended the crest of the hill, but our rear having gotten 
up by this time, we were enabled to hold our position and 
drive the enemy back in confusion. We then strengthened our 
position by removing the logs from their works and placign 
them on the opposite side of the ridge; bivouacekd during the 
night. In the meantime, we received orders to draw four days' 
rations and be ready to move at a moment's notice. In the 
morning we buried our own and the enemy's dead that were 
left on the field. We did not miove until 3 p. m. the next day, 
when we moved to the right following the First and Second 
Brigades and after marching until after dark bivouacked two 
miles east of Rossville. The next morning at 4 o'clock we 
marched to Chickamauga Creek (about seven and one-half 
miles), where we halted for two hours until a bridge could 
be completed to cross the stream, when we again started and 
marched to Ringgold, where we arrived at 12 m., and biv- 
ouckecl for the night. 

November 28, we received orders to go three miles south 
of Ringgold and destroy the railroad, which we succeeded in 
doing, destroying four bridges, tearing up track and burning 
ties for about one mile and returned to Ringgold where we 
camped for the night. 



2 7 8 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



November 29th we were ordered (to return to Chattanooga 
where we arrived at dark. I herewith submit a summary of 
casualties. The Eighteenth Kentucky Infantry being on de- 
tached service were not in the engagement. During the en- 
gagement a great many prisoners were taken by the brigade, 
but they were immediately turned over to the provost guard 
' of the brigade and division, and no memorandum kept of the 
number. All of which is respectfully submitted. 

I am Captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

W. H. Hays, 
Colonel Commanding Brigade. 
Captain A. C. McClurg, 

Acting Assistant Adjutant General. 

December 24. The weather was rainy and cold. Christmas 
was a rainy, dismal day. The boys fired their muskets 
indiscriminately, some of them loaded. Several persons were 
injured and an officer was sent through the command to stop 
the firing. 

January 1, 1864, the cold New Years, opened up with the 
thermometer registering 18 and 20 degrees below zero. Vi- 
dettes and pickets nearly froze to death. It was the coldest 
day ever known throughout the entire country. This weather 
lasted several days and about all the boys did was to keep 
a big fire going in front of the dog tents and take things as 
easy as possible. The government had called for re-enlist- 
ment of veterans during the war. A bounty of $302.00 in 



addition to the original $100.00 was offered.. Many regiments 
re-enlisted in a body. The Tenth , as a regiment, thought by 
the time they had served their full three years it would satisfy 
them with soldier life, and only 75 re-enlisted. About this 
time we received nearly 200 recruits, assigned to different 
companies, Company D receiving the largest assignment. Their 
introduction into military service was quite severe and within 
two months many of them became sick from exposure and 
died. 

February 22nd, 1864, the regiment broke camp at Chat- 
tanooga and with the rest of the Corps started on a recon- 
naisance to Tunnel Hill and Buzzard Roost, following the 
enemy as far as Dalton, after having found him in force 
strongly fortified, withdrew on the 26th to Ringgold, Georgia, 
where we remained in the advance position until May. No 
fighting during the interval excepting occasional scraps be- 
tween the two picket lines. 

During our stay there the chaplains of the two Kentucky 
regiments undertook to get up a revival. Services were tol- 
erably well attended, principally on account of no other diver- 
sions. When the weather moderated they had public bap- 
tisms in the creek near by. One of the Kentucky regiments 
had a larger number for baptism than the other. The colonel 
promptly ordered the adjutant to "detail 25 men for baptism," 

saying he'd "be d d if the — th Kentucky was going to 

beat him in this game." The 35th Ohio Band organized a 
Negro minstrel troupe, and gave nightly performances in the 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



279 



brick Baptist church every evening. The members of the 
troupe were first class performers and the building was packed 
every night; admission 25c. One night nearly all the generals 
in the army were there, including Sherman and Thomas. The 
troupe was "feeling their oats" and got off some terrible gags 
on Sherman and other officers. The cheering, yells and cat 
calls were awful, but everyone appreciated it. None more 
so than Sherman and Thomas. The Troupe kept up these per- 
formances until" the middle of April ; the weather being hot. 
they disbanded the troupe. 



April 30, 1864, we were ordered on a reconnaisance to 
Tunnel Hill to support the 2nd Brigade and Kilpatrick Cav- 
alry. The 1st Brigade under Turchin was parted at the Gap 
and our regiment (10th Indiana) was ordered to support him. 
Kilpatrick reached the crest of the village at Smith's house, 
within musket range of the town. Found the enemy in force. 
We advanced to support Kilpatrick and assist him in falling 
back, as we had found the whole rebel army at Tunnel Hill 
and Dalton. Having accomplished the object sought we re- 
turned to Ringgold. 



CHAPTER XII 



Atlanta Campaign 



OX May 7th. 1864, the 3rd Division (14th Corps) ex- 
cepting our Brigade marched out to participate in 
the Atlanta campaign. The division went as far as 
Tunnel Hill. On the 8th our brigade pulled out to join the 
division, which' it did at a point on the Yillanow road, march- 
ing to Buzzard Roost. 

May 9th, 10th and nth the division remained in reserve 
position to the 1st and 2nd Divisions (Fourteenth Corps) 
which were on the front line. May 12th we proceeded to ad- 
vance, being the advance division of our Corps, moving to the 
right to support McPherson, who was marching through 
Snake Creek Gap, threatening Reseca. The 20th Corps being 
in our way we did not get into position until dark. On the 
13th we resumed the march at noon and about dark took out- 
position. On the 14th our division resumed the march and 
swung into line on the right of Johnson's division. 

We advanced down the hill into an open field where we 
were met with a heavy fire of artillery and musketry, but we 
continued on until we reached the creek. The ground was 
miry and few got beyond the creek, — the firing being so heavy 
they were compelled to fall back. 

Our brigade was placed in reserve of the 1st and 2nd 
Bridgades. On the morning of the 15th our division was 



withdrawn from the line and sent to the extreme right of the 
Corps to aid in filling a gap made by Hooker being trans- 
ferred to left of Schofield. We built works all day and the 
skirmishers were heavily engaged, our regiment losing James 
Easterly, Co. F, who was killed. 

May 16th the skirmishers of our brigade (3rd) found 
out Johnston and his rebel force was evacuating Reseca and 
shortly after daybreak they pushed on into the town. The 
enemy had fled. Directly in our front was a rebel battery 
which annoyed us greatly, and one of the officers of the icjtli 
Indiana Battery belonging to our brigade concluded to silence 
them. Carefully sighting his guns he gave the order to fire. 
Nothing more was heard from them and on going over to 
the rebel lines the next day (16th) found the solid shot had 
entered the muzzle of the rebel gun and split it in two. Our 
division was the first to enter Reseca and discover the with- 
drawal of the rebel army to the south side of the Coosa River. 
Lieut. Colonel Wharton, 10th Kentucky, in charge of the 
skirmishers, was the first officer to enter Reseca. We (3rd 
Division) then marched into the town, where we remained 
until night to await the repair of bridges to cross the river. 

On May 17th we crossed the river at 3 o'clock in the 
morning and went into camp two miles north of Adairsville. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



On the 18th we continued the march continually fighting the 
rear guard of the enemy, who resisted stubbornly to protect 
his wagon trains. We marched through Adairsville and went 
into camp four miles north of Kingston. 

Mav 19th we marched through Kingston, when we re- 
ceived notice that the Johnies were about to make a stand 
and give us trouble. Part of our division was put into posi- 
tion on the hills south of town. We then received orders to 
move east of Kingston and go into line of battle on the left 
of the 4th Corps, which was some four miles from Kings- 
ton. ,The rebs had put up a strong line, but before we reached 
the position the rebel force had been retired from view. On 
May 20th the Rebel army was found to have fallen back, John- 
ston having succeeded in getting his trains across the Etowah 
River near the railroad bridge which was destroyed. On this 1 
day and the two following we remained at Etowah bridge 
resting up and drawing rations, as we expected to leave the 
railroad. On the 23rd the term of service of the 9th Ohio 
expired and they went home to be mustered out. The divi- 
sion lost one of its best regiments. They were with us at Mill 
Springs and did excellent service. They could be depended 
upon in any emergency. The 24th Illinois of the 1st Brigade 
went to the rear for muster out. This is the regiment whose 
quartermaster was shot at Rolling Fork where the right wing 
of our regiment was on duty. Our regiment was detached 
from the division for garrison duty at Kingston and the divi- 
sion resumed the march, crossing Etowah River at Island 
Ford. 



June 6th we rejoined the division at Big Shanty. June 
10th we marched at 6 a. m. in front of the Corps. We cross- 
ed Proctor's Creek at the old mill and the advanced guard of 
our brigade soon got in a fight with the rebel army. The 
fighting for a time was severe, but we drove everything before 
us and formed a line on a hill near Pine Mountain in full view 
of the rebel works and their batteries. Our batteries were 
soon in position and an artillery duel was kept up for some 
time. 

June nth we drove the rebel skirmishers back nearer to 
the base of the mountain and our lines advanced. We subse- 
quently moved to the left, placing us on the right of our Corps 
(14th), facing south and about a mile north of the Big Shanty 
and Marietta road — on the northeast end of Pine Mountain. 
We remained in this position until June 14, our whole line 
advancing and intrenched. The enemy had a strong line of 
works built, stretching from the base of Pine Mountain to 
the east. At this point we fought the enemy, who strongly 
resisted, and at dark succeeded in driving them from their 
rifle pits and gaining the road. June 15th the enemy again 
fell back evacuating his works of which we took possession. 
Our division (3rd) advanced about a mile and a half, when 
we came upon the rebel pickets in the vicinity of Smith's 
House, where we again intrenched and planted batteries. June 
16 and 17 we gradually drove the enemy in our front and 
secured an advantageous position, — being close up to the rebel 
fortifications. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



283 



June 18, the 4th Corps having been ordered to swing for- 
ward to the left, we were ordered to their support. It was a 
very difficult road, with bogs to travel over, for infantry, but 
impassable for artillery. After passing this we came into 
open ground in front of the enemy where there was some 
desperate fighting. Our men had to creep gradually toward 
the rebel works, covering themselves on the open ground and 
facing directly into the embrasures of the rebel batteries. We 
had no batteries present at this time, but Capt. Dilger ( 'Leath- 
er Breeches") Battery I, 1st Ohio Light Artillery came up 
and gave them several "wollies." We worked hard and by 
dark had a strong line of works completed within 500 yards 
of the rebel ifitrenchments. June 19th, after all our hard 
work, the next morning we found the rebs had again evacu- 
ated and fallen back to their lines on Kenesaw Mountain. Our 
division (Third) pursued them to the Central Knob of the 
mountain, near Kirk's house and after a sharp skirmish es- 
tablished our line at the base of the mountain. 

June 20th, we again threw up strong works for our pro- 
tection and during the day our division lost thirty men killed 
and wounded by shells and sharpshooters. We remained in 
this position until June 26th, when we were ordered to sup- 
port the First Division (Fourteenth Corps) Davis, who had 
been ordered to join the Fourth Corps in an assault on the 
mountain. We moved at once and at midnight were in Our 
position in rear of First Division. June 27th, earl}' in the 
morning, we formed in rear of Davis, and by 10 o'clock the 
assault was made, Woods' (Second) Division of the Fourth 



Corps in the advance. Steadily they advanced, under a ter- 
rific fire of infantry and artillery. The boys reached the 
works on top of the mountain, but it was impossible to hold 
them and they were compelled to fall back with heavy loss. 
How General Sherman conceived the idea of breaking the 
rebel center by a direct charge up the almost perpendicular 
sides of Kenesaw was the wonder of all. A fly might walk 
up a wall, but it has never been demonstrated that men could 
do it. .It was evidently one of the "mistakes of Sherman." 

From June 28th to July 3rd we remained in the same 
position. Our works were so close to the enemy that neither 
could leave their rifle pits in day time without great danger 
of losing his life. No one dared to show his head. The two 
lines were close enough to hold loud conversation and the 
two lines indulged in many jokes at the expense of the other. 

July 3rd the rebel army again "fell back" abandoning his 
stronghold on top of Kenesaw, during the night, and our men 
entered their works before daybreak, promptly pursuing them, 
captured a large number of prisoners. We marched at an 
early hour and passed through Marietta July 4, about 1 o'clock 
p. in., hot after the Johnnies. When about two miles out of 
the town we came upon the rebel army behind new intrench- 
ments. The remainder of the day was spent reconnoitering 
this position. 

July 5th, the enemy again evacuated his strong works and 
retreated to the Chattahoochie River during the night. We 
pursued the fleeing enemy on the road to Vinning's Station 
on the railroad. Some distance from Vinning's the head of 



2S4 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



our column came upon a strong rear guard of the enemy. The 
Tenth Indiana skirmishers pressed the enemy vigorously and 
drove them beyond the road. We reached the crest of the 
hill overlooking the stationa nd could see the rebels moving 
a train south was shelled by our batteries with telling effect. 
We crossed the Chattahocchie and on July 6th, 7th and 8th 
remained passive. July 9th we were ordered to push out and 
our skirmishers were kept busy "feeling for" the enemy for 
the purpose of finding his position and his strength. Our 
brigade (Third) moved at 8 a. m., and drove in the advance 
pickets of the rebels some hundreds of yards in our front. 
We finally struck a very heavy line of the enemy posted in 
strong rifle pits and supported by heavy reserves. The enemy 
having driven back our right (First Division) doubled ou our 
brigade and drove us back nearly to our first position. Being 
reinforced by another regiment we again advanced and drove 
the enemy back to his rifle pits. Colonel Este, commanding 
our brigade, was wounded in the leg, but fought with the 
troops when we advanced our whole line and intrenched. 

July 10th we moved to Pace's Ferry, relieving the Fourth 
Corps. From July nth to 17th we remained in this position 
doing picket duty along river bank. On the 17th we crossed 
the river, advanced, passing Nancy's Creek at Howell's Mills 
on Peach Tree Creek. July 19th was spent in reconnoitering 
the creek, which was deep and bridges destroyed. We crossed 
the creek at the mill at dark, building a temporary bridge, and 
by midnight were well intrenched on the hill. 



July 20th our brigade (Third) moved forward, forming 
on the left of the First Brigade, which had previously crossed 
with Davis' Division. Our division (Third) then pushed 
across and took possession of a range of wooded hills. We 
were subjected to a heavy fire nearly the \yhole day from the 
rebel batteries. Our batteries had been ordered up, but be- 
fore they could get ready, Hood fiercely attacked theTwentieth 
Corps and Johnson's Division of our Corps (Fourteenth). 
The attack did not reach our division, but from our position 
we could see the whole engagement. It was terrific. Charges 
and counter charges with the bayonet were made by both 
armies and by dark the Battle of Peach Tree Creek was 
fought and Hood defeated. 

July 2 1st we skirmished with the enemy some, but the 
rest of the day no enemy seen or firing heard. We marched 
until 3 o'clock p. m. Halted on a high rise of ground with 
a gradual slope of a half a mile. From our position we could 
see three rebel forts, the farthest being about two miles and 
manned with heavy ordnance (64 pounders). Generals Sher- 
man and Thomas rode up and took position near the colors 
of the Tenth Indiana. Sherman insisted the enemy had evac- 
uated, but Thomas insisted the "woods was full of 'em." 
Sherman wanted Thomas to take the Fourteenth Corps and 
charge the woods. Thomas replied "he would not have a man 
left if he did." "That it was evidently a trap and masked 
batteries without number in the woods, and very few men 
would get out alive." General Thomas was so positive that 
Sherman recanted and ordered works thrown up at once. The 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



28 S 



regiment stacked arms and went to work. By morning we 
had a splendid line of works ; strong, and from the slope of the 
ground, were impregnable, no matter what force the enemy 
came against them. 

From July 21st to August 3rd we held this position. Dur- 
ing this time the forts in our front had been relinquished, but 
on the 24th the farthest fort cut loose just at 12 o'clock noon. 
The alarm was given as scon as the smoke came from the 
gun, but the boys paid no attention to it until the 64-pounder 
shell struck just over the ditch inside of the works, when it 
exploded. The noise was terrific. Cornelius Rile}', Co. C, 
had picked up a camp kettle to go after water, his arm was 
amputated near the elbow, the camp kettle going high in the 
air. Captain Hunt, Company K ; Captain Boyle, Company C ; 
Lieutenant Allen, Company C, and Lieutenant Colwell, 
Company B, were seated at a table playing cards, were 
knocked to the ground by the concussion, but not injured. 
A piece of the shell killed a man in Thirty-eighth Ohio, which 
laid a hundred yards in our rear. Another piece went through 
a horse standing about a quarter of a mile to our rear. From 
that time our boys kept their eye on the farthest fort. On 
July 26th about dark, several rebel batteries opened on the 
laid a hundred yards in our rear. Another piece went through 
There were no casualties, however, from this shelling. 

July 27, Company F was on picket at the bottom of the 
hill in front of our works. Promptly at 12 o'clock noon an- 
other compliment from the "furdest fort" was sent, striking 
in Company F quarters and cleaning out one row of dog tents 



and scattering things generally. Had Company F been in 
camp it would have undoubtedly killed half of the company. 
The boys on picket saw the "varmint" as it passed over their 
heads and could hear the whizzing noise plainly. This was the 
last we heard of the fort. 

On the 27th the Army of the Tennessee moved around 
to the extreme right, and on the 28th was attacked by Hood's 
army and was a desperate battle, afterwards known as the 
Battle of Ezra Church, and was near the fort that had caused 
us so much trouble. During the three days' fight, July 20th, 
22nd and 28th, Hood lost about 20,000 men in killed, wounded 
and prisoners 

August 3rd, the Thirty-fifth Ohio Infantry of the Second 
Brigade was sent to Vinning's Station and was mustered out 
at that point. Four regiments of our division had been sent 
to the rear for muster out and all of them were first class 
fighters. On this date (August 3rd) our Corps (Fourteenth) 
received orders to march to the extreme right of the army. 
We passed the Twenty-third Corps and the First and Second 
Divisions of our Corps (Fourteenth) and went into camp on 
Utoy Creek near an old mill. We went into camp on a range 
of hills, our right resting on the creek. We at once com- 
menced to build a strong line of works. August 4th we 
were ordered forward to another range of hills in our front 
and as an assault was contemplated, our division was to be 
the assaulting column. 

August 5th we were formed in line of battle and were 
ordered to take another range of hills. A heavy skirmish line 



286 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



was established and the skirmishers ordered forward. They 
-made a dash and after some heavy fighting captured their sec- 
ond line of rifle pits and advanced to within a short distance 
of the main rebel works. At this point we threw up our third 
and last line of works so far as our regiment was concerned. 
The enemy kept up a heavy artillery fire. We captured the 
entire rebel skirmish lines besides many other prisoners. In 
this fight Lieut. Colonel Baker, Seventy-fourth Indiana, of our 
brigade, was killed. From August 8th to the 26th our camp 
remained the same in the third line of works and on this day 
we', the Tenth Indiana, was ordered to Marietta, Ga., to pre- 
pare for final muster out. 

The following notice was received, that we were to leave 
the front and prepare for final muster out : 

Headquarters 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division, 
14th Army Corps 
In the field, Georgia, Aug. 15, 1864. 

Colonel : — In accordance with orders from Department 
Headquarters, the Tenth Indiana Volunteers will tomorrow 
morning proceed to Marietta, Georgia, relieving the Second 
Minnesota Volunteers, and there complete arrangements for 
final muster out of the United States service. 

Lists of officers and men on detached duty serving with 
the brigade will be made out and left at Brigade Headquar- 
ters, in order that they may be relieved at the earliest prac- 
ticable moment. Lists will note whether the men are veterans, 
recruits or men whose time is about to expire. 



In excess of enough for ordinary purposes, trenching 
tools will be turned over to the Brigade Quartermaster. 

With tomorrow practically the Tenth will sever its con- 
nection with the Third Brigade. 'Twill be the severance of old 
— long continued and long to be remembered associations. 
During the period of their continuance a proud and noble rec- 
ord has been made by this brigade — to a full share of the 
credit in making — the Tenth is, richly entitled. No better regi- 
ment from the Hoosier State ever went forth to the defence 
of the Republic's liberties than the gallant Tenth Indiana. 

To the officers and men comprising the regiment the col- 
onel commanding (Este) tenders his heartfelt thanks for the 
uniform and hearty support they have always rendered him — 
and begs leave to assure them one and all of his deep regre*- 
at the separation, and sincere wishes, that their future course, 
may be as happy as their past has been glorious. 
I am Colonel very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. F. StopFord, 
Lieut. Col. M. B. Taylor. Capt. and A. A. A. G. 

Commanding iotti Reg. Ind. Vols., 
3rd Brig., 3rd Div., 14th A. C. 

This officer was killed at Battle of Jonesboro a few days 
after writing the foregoing. Este commanding brigade, and 
Stopford his assistant adjutant general were colonel and adju- 
tant respectively of the Fourteenth Ohio. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



287 



We remained there on garrison duty, but not without 
some fighting and had several men killed. 

Marrietta was a nice place with a population of probably 
4,000. Near there was a large cotton factory at which were 
300 or 400 girls employed. Every morning we would go to 
the picket line to "market." The natives would come to the 
lines with butter, eggs, chickens, etc., which the boys would 
buy liberally. Our money was no good to them — in fact, we 
had none, not having been paid off for nine months, but they 
readily exchanged their vegetables for salt. The people in 
the south had no salt and for five or ten pounds of salt the 
boys could buy all they could carry. So during our stay at 
Marietta we "lived high." 

September 5. 1864, the officers were ordered to prepare 
descriptive lists of veterans and recruits, and turn these men 
over to the Fifty-eighth Indiana Infantry. The men from 
the companies of our regiment were assigned to the companies 
of same letter in the Fifty-eighth. 

The transfer was completed September 5th, and on Sep- 
tember 10th we boarded the cars for God's country — for home. 
It took us a day and a night to reach Chattanooga. Here we 
stopped over a day to draw rations and pick up sick, wounded 
or detached men. 

September nth, left Chattanooga and arrived at Nashville 
about 12 a. m., of the 12th, marching from the depot through 
"Smoky Row" to the Louisville depot. Here we waited until 
7 o'clock p. m., for a train. Boarded the train and on next 
morning found we had gone eleven miles; a breakdown caus- 



ing the delay. Arrived at Louisville that evening, crossed over 
to Jeffersonville September 13th, took the train there and was 
on the last lap. About 10 o'clock p. m., near Seymour, Indi- 
ana, some flat cars in our train jumped the track and upon 
investigation found that David P>. Cox, First Sergeant of Com- 
pany K, had been killed. How it occurred or when, was never 
learned, but he had been run over and the body severed in 
twain. He was a favorite in his companv and in fact beloved 
by all who knew him. The accident and death cast a gloom 
over the entire regiment. The boys were happy when they 
crossed the Ohio River and set foot in "God's Country," and 
were greatlv elated over the prospect that we would soon be 
home and released from duty. But the death of Sergeant Cox 
caused everyone to be downhearted and gloomy, especially so, 
by reason of his serving his full term of service, participating 
in all the battles in which the regiment had been engaged, and 
.finally to be killed in a railroad accident within a hundred 
miles of his home was heartrendering in the extreme. 

We arrived at Indianapolis on the morning of September 
14, 1864. No one was at the depot to pilot us to camp, no 
arrangement had been made for our reception, the boys had 
not been paid off for nearly nine months, were hungry, tired 
and weary from the long ride from Atlanta to Indianapolis, 
consequently they were not in a very amicable frame of mind. 
After some delay we were marched west on Washington street 
and ordered to go into camp with the "Quinine Brigade" 
(Veteran Reserve Corps). 



288 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



The officers of the "Brigade" conceived the idea that we 
would have to be kept in camp, and immediately put a guard 
around us. This of course caused a row. Nearly all of the 
regimental officers had gone to the city, and the companies 
were left in charge of non-commissioned officers. The boys 
were hungry and wanted to go out, but were refused by those 
on guard. A riot took place at once and some of the regiment 
landed in the guard house. Many of the men broke guard 
and went to the city. Colonel Taylor put in an appearance 
soon after some one had sent word as to the condition of 
affairs and ordered the officers in charge of the camp to re- 
lease his men at once or he would tear the place down. It 
seems that this "Quinine Brigade" had killed one of the Ninth 
Indiana and the Thirty-sixth Indiana the day before, and some 
of the Tenth told them we had plenty of ammunition and 
could make short work of "play off and stay-at-homes" com- 
posing this brigade. Finally Colonel Taylor ordered the regi- 
ment to "fall in," and marched us to a commons just across 
the road from the "Quinine Brigade." Tents and rations were 
issued to us and we settled down to camp duty once more, 
awaiting muster out. 

On Saturday, September 17th, Colonel Taylor notified all 
those who so desired could go home to spend the Sabbath, 
but to report promptly Monday the 19th, as on that day we 
would receive our pay and discharges. Many took advantage 
of this, but most of them preferred to remain until they could 
go home to stay. 



September 19. 1864, we received our final discharges, were 
paid off and the regiment left for their homes in various parts 
of the state. 

While the members of the regiment were glad to be home 
once more, yet the separation caused intense sorrow! For 
three long years they had passed through untold hardships 
together, they had shared with each other the contents of can- 
teen and haversack, had been on the long weary marches and 
on hotly contested battlefields, formed friendships under most 
trying circumstances, watched over each other in sickness, — 
ties formed under such conditions could never be severed. 
Farewells were spoken, many for the last time, — all these 
things coming to mind had a tendency to create sadness. The 
Tenth Indiana Infantry on that day ceased to exist as an or- 
ganization, but their record will live to the end of time. ' They 
have the record of opening four general engagements : — Rich 
Mountain, Va., July 11, 1861 ; Mill Springs, Ky., January 19, 
1862; Perryville, Ky., October 8, 1862; Chicamauga, Ga., Sep- 
tember 19, 1863. All of these battles resulted in victories for 
the United States forces. In all these engagements the Tenth 
was the "first in" and "last out." The morale of the regiment 
was not excelled by any regiment from Indiana. The men — 
at least the greater part of them — were religiously inclined, 
many of them temperate in their habits. Strict military dis- 
cipline was unnecessary in the Tenth, as the members of the 
regiment obeyed all orders, or the military laws of the army 
from a sense of duty, not because the}' were compelled to do 
so. Any duty they were called upon to perform, no matter 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



289 



how dangerous the duty, it was performed with promptness 
which called forth the praise of the generals in command. 

The personnel of the regiment was excellent. No regi- 
ment from the state excelled it. Probably seven-eighths of 
the membership came from the farm, all strong, healthy young 
men, the flower of the Eighth Congressional District. Nearly 
every trade and profession was represented, as well as nearly 
all religious creeds — Protestants, Catholic, Hebrew and 
"Turk." In politics the majority of the regiment were Doug- 
lass Democrats, a few of the Southern "fire-eating kind, Re- 
publicans andAbolitionists, but they seldom indulged in polit- 
ical controversies, and in November, 1864, it is safe to say 
nine-tenths of the regiment voted for Lincoln and Morton. 

During our entire term of service no member of 
the regiment was ever arrested, tried or convicted of a 
felony or misdemeanor. Trivial violations of Rules and Reg- 
ulations, such as excessive indulgence of "Apple Jack," was 
generally punished by the offender having to "police the quar- 
ters" or go on "double duty." The boys generally looked 
upon this as an "honor conferred rather than a punishment." 
Officers and men .were on general terms of familiarity when 
off duty or in camp. We had no martinets, no unnecessary 
exhibition of authority, yet every request of the officers to the 
men was strictly complied with. When on duty, due rever- 
ence was paid to the officer in command, and full authority 
recognized. 

Our losses were not quite so great probably as some 
other regiments from the state for the reason we missed two 



severe engagements — Shiloh and Stone River. In the former 
our division was compelled to march in rear of the army of 
the Ohio, Monday, April 7, 1862, by reason of our having the 
advance on Sunday previous, and the latter by reason of our 
brigade being detached and started on a foot race with John 
Morgan's cavalry. Had we been in these two engagements 
we would evidently have lost heavily, as the Tenth had a habit 
of "staying in the game" as long as there was anything to 
shoot at. The members of the Tenth Indiana have cause to 
feel proud of its record. Posterity, as it reads its history, of 
its achievements, its patriotism, bravery and gallantry on the 
battlefield, its fortitude under most trying circumstances, will 
feel a pride in the glorious record of the Tenth Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry. 

Report of Brigadier General Absalom Baird. 

U. S. Army, Commanding 3rd Division, 14th Army Corps. 
Headquarters U. S. Forces, 

Ringgold, Ga., May 2nd, 1864. 

General : — In obedience to your orders, I sent General 
Kilpatrick out this morning upon the Tunnel Hill road. I 
likewise sent Colonel Vanderveer with his brigade to support 
him. Before starting I posted General Turchin in front of 
the gap with a portion of the Third Brigade, and directing 
him to take charge of the matters here, accompanied the col- 
umn myself. General Kilpatrick drove the outposts of the en- 
emy without great opposition from their ordinary positions 
to Tunnel Hill, and he himself immediatelv reached the crest 



290 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



this side of the village, at Smith's House, which is almost 
within musket range of the town. From this point he sent 
back word that the enemy had deployed himself in large force 
beyond the village and on Tunnell Hill ridge, and asked for 
assistance of the infantry, as he otherwise might find it dif- 
ficult to withdraw his skirmishers, some of whom were dis- 
mounted men. I immediately went forward with four regi- 
ments, having found it necessary to post three out of the 
brigade to guard important avenues of approach upon our 
rear and flanks. 

Arriving at Smith's House I saw the lines of rebel troops 
stretching along the ridge for a long distance, and a line in 
low ground at its base. Some of these men were on foot, but 
I suppose them to have been dismounted cavalry. A battery 
was likewise reported by the signal officer as visible on the 
ridge. I was informed by the family of my guide Terrell 
that no change had taken place in the rebel force about Tun- 
nel Hill, and that none was known to have taken place at Dal- 
ton ; on the contrary, that the enemy had been strengthening 
his works at Buzzard Roost by darning up the creek and other- 
wise, and apparently intended to stand there. 

I was satisfied from what I saw that no material portion 
of any of the enemy's force had been withdrawn, and not feel- 
ing authorized to attack so strong a position with four regi- 
ments of infantry, I determined to withdraw. The cavalry 
being at the time collected in masses in the open field, within 
range of artillery, I hastened to send it to the rear and back 



to camp, posting a line of infantry in its place. This done, 
I soon after withdrew with but little molestation. A small 
party followed my rear guard, and exchanged shots with it, 
but without effect, and the reconnaisance was successfully ter- 
minated. I had in all about ten men wounded ; two I am told 
mortally. The loss of the enemy is not learned that after the 
previous reconnaisance fifteen wounded rebels were taken to 
Terrell's house. I was told that the railroad is still running to 
Tunnel Hill. 

f must commend to the major-general commanding the 
fine soldierly qualities displayed by both General Kilpatrick 
and Colonel YanDerveer in my two reconnaisances. 
Most respectfully, your obedient servant, 

A. Baibd, 
Brig.-Gen. W. D. Whipple Brig. -General Commanding. 

A. A. G. and Chief of Staff, 

Department of the Cumberland. 

Headquarters 3rd Div., 14th Army Corps. 
Jonesborough, Ga., Sept. 7, 1864. 
Captain : — I have the honor to submit the following re- 
port of the part performed by this division in the campaign 
which began with the movement of the army from Chatta- 
nooga, Term., in my last, and terminated with the capture of 
Atlanta, Ga., in the 1st instant. 

On the 22nd day of February this division marched from 
Chattanooga, together with the other two divisions of the 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



291 



Corps, to Tunnel Hill and Buzzard Roost Gap, for the pur- 
pose of making a reconnaisance of the enemy's position in 
front of Dalton, and having ascertained by feeling him closely 
for two clays that his army was still there in force, strongly 
posted and fortified, we withdrew upon the night of the 26th 
to Ringgold, where this division took part, the remainder of 
the troops being removed to other points. 

From Februarv until May the division continued to oc- 
cupy that place as the extreme advance part of the army. Our 
pickets and those of the enemy were always in close proximity, 
and affairs of minor importance between them were of con- 
stant occurrence. On two occasions, reconnoitering parties of 
large force were sent as far as Tunnel Hill, both of which 
were highly successful, and chiefly useful in inspiring our 
cavalry with greater confidence in their superiority over that 
of the enemy. In each of these expeditions Brigadier-General 
Kilpatrick, whose division of cavalry was placed under my 
charge, commanded the cavalry, and Colonel F. Vanderveer 
of the Thirty-fifth Ohio, an infantry brigade. Both of these 
officers displayed on these occasions the high soldierly quali- 
ties for which they are known, energy and boldness, guided by 
the coolest judgment. During the interval from the 1st to the 
6th of May the divisions and corps of the Army of the Cum- 
berland were concentrated about Ringgold, the Army of the 
Ohio taking a position on our left and the Army of the Ten- 
nessee a line of march passing to our right. My division was 
at that time constituted as follows : 



Infantry. 

First Brigade, Brig. Gen. J. B. Turchin. Commanding. 

Command Officers Men Total 

11th Ohio, Lieut. Col. Ogden Street , 15 263 278 

17th Ohio, Col. Durbin Ward 22 569 571 

31st Ohio, Col. M. B. Walker 26 583 609 

89th Ohio, Major J. H. Jolly 10 211 221 

92nd Ohio, Col. D. B. Fearing 13 310 323 

82nd Indiana, Col. M. C. Hunter 17 252 269 

19th Illinois, Lieut. Col. A. W. Raffen 15 239 254 

24th Illinois, Capt. A. Mauff 14 211 225 

Total 132 2618 2750 

Second Brigade, Col. F. VanDevEER, 35th Ohio, 
Commanding. 

Command Officers Men Total 

2nd Minnesota, Col. J. George 22 380 402 

35th Ohio, Major J. L. Budd 15 277 282 

9th Ohio, Col. G. Kammerling 20 380 400 

87th Indiana, Col. N. Gleason 17 316 333 

105th Ohio, Lieut. Col. G. T. Perkins 15 337 352 

101st Indiana, Lieut. Col. Thomas Doan 19 359 378 

75th Indiana, Lieut. Col. William O'Brien 23 408 431 

Total 131 2457 2588 

Third Brigade, Col. G. P. Este, 14th Ohio, Commanding. 

Command Officers Men Total 

10th Kentucky, Col. W. H. Hays 23 343 368 

10th Indiana, Lieut. Col. M. B. Taylor 32 653 6S5 

14th Ohio, Major J. W. Wilson 36 498 51S 



292 



HISTORY 01? THB TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



ISth Kentucky, Lieut. Col. H. K. Milward 28 454 676 

3Sth Ohio, Col. W. A. Choate 25 651 676 

74th Indiana, Lieut. Col. M. Baker 15 380 395 

Total 143 2979 3122 

Total Infantry 406 8054 8460 

Artillery. 

7th Iud. Battery, 1st Lieut. O. H. Morgan... 4 157 161 100 6 

19th Ind. Battery, 1st Lieut. W. P. Stackhouse 3 144 147 118 6 



Total Artillery 



7 301 308 218 12 



NARRATIVE. 

Official Report. 

Brig.-Genl. Absalom Baird, Commanding, 
3rd Div., 14th Corps. 

May 7th, leaving Colonel Este's brigade (the Third) in 
garrison at, Ringgold, the remainder of the division marched 
on the morning of the 7th to Tunnel Hill. The other two 
divisions of the corps, being in advance, had already brushed 
away with their advance guards the pickets of the enemy at 
that place and had gone into position when we arrived. The 
division went into line on the right a little to the south of the 
village, where it remained during the night. 

On the morning of the 8th the division moved south three 
miles upon the Villanow road, so as to form connection with 
the corps of Major-General Hooker and at the same time. to 
cover the right flank of Brig.-Genl. Johnson, who was swinging 



forward to the south end of Tunnel Hill ridge. In the after- 
noon we crossed the ridge and moved in support of Brigadier 
Generals Johnson and Davis, then in front of Buzzard Roost 
Gap. 

May 9th, 10th and nth, during these days we remained 
in our position in reserve, no active operations being carried 
on in our front. May 12th my division, 'in advance of the 
corps, marched at daybreak toward the right, to support Major. 
General McPherson, who had passed his army through Snake 
Creek Gap and had taken position in Sugar Valley threatening 
Reseca. Being detained by the Twentieth Corps in advance 
of me, I did not get into position until after dark. The other 
divisions of the Fourteenth Corps were behind me, and they 
were followed by the Twenty-third Corps. 

May 13th, moved forward at noon along with the re- 
mainder of the army, and about dark got into position of the 
left of Brig.-Genl. Johnson's division, upon a series of steep 
and difficult hills, covered with a dense wood and under- 
growth. Major General Schofield was somewhere on my left 
and rear, but not connecting. Brig.-General Johnson's skir- 
mishers became engaged with those of the enemy, but mine 
did not come in contact with them. 

RESECA. 

May 14th, having received during the night from the 
Major-General commanding the corps to swing forward my 
entire line along with that of Brig.-General Johnson, his right 
being taken as the pivot, and to push on until the enemy was 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



293 



encountered, I put my troops in motion at daybreak. Colonel 
Van Derveer was on my right, formed in two lines, and Brig. 
General Tttrchin on the left formed in the same manner. My 
right had moved some three-fourths of a mile, and the direc- 
tion of our line was about due north and south, facing east, 
when I received another order from the same source, inform- 
ing me that Major General Schofield, whose corps was then 
in line, half a mile to my rear, with his right overlapping nearly 
the whole of my left brigade, was about to advance and charge 
the enemy's works, and directing me to move forward with 
him and assault at the same time. I had not previously known 
that the enemy had works in our vicinity, nor was I then in- 
formed as to their position, their character or the manner in 
which the attack was to be made. There was, of course, no 
time for a reconnaisance by me without neglecting to advance 
along with Major-General Schofield as ordered. I had barely 
time to give the proper instructions to Brig.-General Turchin 
on my left, and was communicating the same to the right 
brigade, when the troops of Brig.-General Judah, on Scho- 
field's right, came up with my left. His front line passed 
through my rear line, before mine began to advance, and thus 
interlaced both went forward together. It was subsequently 
ascertained that the rebel line of works ran along the western 
slope of the ridge, which extended from near Reseca north- 
ward, on the west side of the railroad. A narrow valley, in- 
tersected along its length by a boggy creek, separated this 
from another ridge which lay parallel with and in front of our 
line. This our troops had to pass. It was covered for a space 



of nearly half a mile in width by so dense a growth of woods 
that an individual alone could make his way through it with 
difficulty. It was utterly impossible in this thicket for a regi- 
ment, much less a brigade commander, to see and control the 
two extremities of his command. Yet our lines of battle 
worked through it and reached the crest overlooking the valley 
in as much order as could have been expected. 

From this position the rebel works could be distinctly 
seen, and could our men have been allowed to halt here and 
reform and to readjust their lines, which an examination of 
the position should be made, better results might have ensued. 
It would appear that Maj. -General Schofield's left in open 
ground did not encounter the same difficulties as his right, 
and pressing forward, the impulsion was communicated along 
the line to his right, which carried my left brigade with it. It 
was the affair of a moment, and before I could learn (at 300 
yards distant upon the right), of the condition of affairs, it 
was too late to stop the movement. Descending about 100 
feet the almost vertical slope of the ridge our men emerged 
into the open valley, and into direct view, at short range, of 
the rebel works, and immediately received a fire of artillery 
and musketry. The tried veterans of this division, who had 
never failed to accomplish anything that was possible, did 
not falter, but pushed forward until they had reached the 
creek. Few got beyond this. Many stuck under the miry 
banks of the stream and a few isolated groups that got beyond, 
not being in sufficient force to sustain themselves, were driven 
back. It was at once apparent that this effort had failed and 



294 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



was at an end, and most of the men were withdrawn to the 
summit of the ridge to be reformed. 

A few, unable on account of the sharp fire from the rebel 
works to leave the banks of the creek, remained there until 
dark doing valuable duty as sharpshooters. The movement of 
the First Brigade, along with Ma j. -General Schofield's troops, 
had been so sudden, and the distance to go being less, the 
Second Brigade did not reach the crest of the hill until after 
the failure of Schofield's right and my left had become known, 
and I did not have it advance farther. Our whole line, from 
the right of the Twentieth Corps to the left of the Twenty- 
third Corps, continued to occupy the ridge during the after- 
noon, and having placed numerous batteries in position, shelled 
the rebel works with fine effect. The loss by command sus- 
tained in the operations of this day was as follows : Casualties 
May 14. 1864 — Killed, 2 officers and 14 enlisted men; wounded 
7 officers and 112 enlisted men; total, 9 officers and 126 en- 
listed men. 

During the day the Third Brigade, with the exception of 
the Eighteenth Kentucky, which remained to garrison Ring- 
gold, carne up and was placed in reserve behind the other 
brigades. On the morning of the ijjth my division was with- 
drawn from the line and sent to the extreme right of the 
corps to aid in filling a gap. Major General Hooker being 
taken out to operate on the left of Schofield. I there con- 
nected on my right with the left of the Fifteenth Corps of 
the Army of the Tennessee. The position was an important 
one, and my men worked industriously during the day and 



following night in advancing and strengthening our works, so 
as to give more perfect command of those of the enemy in 
our front. Our skirmishers were during this time hotly en- 
gaged with those of the rebels. May 16th, during the night, 
the skirmishers in front of my Third Brigade discovered signs 
of a movement of the enemy, and pressing forward shortly' 
before daybreak entered his line and found' them evacuated. 
Together with a party of the First Division of the corps, 
which advanced about the same time, they pushed on into 
Reseca and were the first to enter the place, and the first to 
discover the entire withdrawal of the rebel forces to the south 
side of the river, Lieut. -Colonel Wharton, of the Tenth Ken- 
tucky, in charge of the skirmishers from my Third Brigade, 
being the first officer who entered Reseca. The division was 
marched into the town and remained there until night to 
await the construction of bridges on which to cross the Oos- 
tenaula in pursuit. At Reseca. the Eleventh Ohio was de- 
tached from the First Brigade and left in garrison at that 
place, thus reducing my command by 278 men. It was soon 
after mustered out of service. May 17th my wagons having 
been crossed over during the night, the division passed the 
river at 3 a. m., and followed closely upon the heels of the 
Fourth Corps, encamped at night two miles north of Adairs- 
ville. The advanced guard of Major-General Howard had 
closed up with the enemy and was skirmishing throughout the 
afternoon with his rear. May 18th, the march was continued 
as upon the day previous, the enemy resisting strongly to 
cover the withdrawal of his trains. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



^95 



Passing through Adairsville, my division encamped for 
night four miles north of Kingston. May 19th. marching 
through Kingston, I was there informed by Major General 
Palmer that the enemy was exhibiting himself in a threatening 
attitude in our front, and I was ordered to post the division on 
a range of hills, south of town. This order was duly executed, 
but later, during the afternoon, other orders were received 
directing me to move out to the east of town and go into line 
on the right of the Fourth Corps. When I got to the position 
designated, that corps was already four miles out from the 
town. My line, when formed, connected with the right of 
Brigadier General Wood, my right resting on the railroad. 
During the afternoon, previous to my arrival, I was informed 
that the enemy had displayed quite a formidable line of battle, 
but before my division reached the ground it had been retired 
from view. May 20th. On this morning the Rebel force was 
found to have again fallen back, having succeeded in passing 
his trains over the Etowah River at or near the railroad bridge 
which was afterward destroyed. Throughout this and the 
two following days our troops remained in position, filling 
themselves with supplies, so as to be able to quit the railroad 
and move on the enemy's flank. On the 23rd the Ninth Ohio, 
of the Second Brigade, whose term of service had expired, 
went north for the purpose of being mustered out. At the 
same time the Twenty-fourth Illinois from the First Brigade 
and the Tenth Indiana from the Third Brigade, were detached 
and left in garrison at Kingston. The Twenty-fourth Illinois 
never afterward rejoined the command, as its term of service 



soon expired. May 23rd my division again marched, and, 
crossing the Etowah at Island Ford, encamped on Euharlee 
Creek. From this time until the end of the month we re- 
mained in rear guarding or escorting trains, generally not far 
from Burnt Hickory. 

June 1st, leaving the 1st Brigade in charge of the trains 
at Burnt Flickory, I marched to the front with the other two 
and joined the main army, then going into position on the line 
running northerly from Dallas toward Ackworth, east of 
Pumpkin Vine Creek. 

June 2nd. Having relieved a portion of the First Divi- 
sion, Fourteenth Army Corps and extended the line to the 
left, I at once advanced my front to a more commanding po- 
sition and intrenched. We were then in close proximity to the 
strongly constructed works of the enemy, my right connecting 
with the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, and Scho- 
field operating at a little distance on my left. During the 3rd 
and 4th my men worked constantly, both day and night, ad- 
vancing our lines by pushing our skirmishers to the front, and 
then intrenching the troops upon the ground which they had 
gained. I thus, with trifling loss, drove the Rebel skirmishers 
into their main works, and put up batteries within short range 
of them. June 5th at daybreak, it was discovered that the 
enemy had withdrawn under the cover of night, abandoning a 
line of elaborately constructed field works of great strength. We 
received no orders to pursue, but remained all day in our po- 
sition. June 6th we again marched to the front upon Burnt 
Hickory and Big Shanty road, and at night I got into line on 



296 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



the left of the Twentieth Corps near Durham's house. Con- 
tinuing at this point until the morning of the 10th, the First 
Brigade, relieved 1 from duty with the trains, came up and joined 
the division. It had lost while away two regiments, the Tenth 
Ohio and Twenty-fourth Illinois, by expiration of service. 

The Tenth Indiana of the Third Brigade came up to us 
about the same time. June 10th; this division marched at 6 
a. m. in front of the corps, the Army of the Tennessee on our 
left, moving along the railroad. We took such roads as we 
could parallel to it, and after crossing Proctor's Creek at the 
old mill, our advance guard of the Third Brigade soon struck 
the Rebel skirmishers. These were readily driven back, and 
my line formed upon an eminence in front of Pine Mountain, 
in full view of the Rebel works upon it and within range of 
their batteries. 

Our artillery was at once put in position and kept up an 
effective cannonade during the afternoon while the Fourth 
Corps was coming into position on our right. The object in 
view at this point was to obtain control of the Burnt Hickory 
and Marietta road. Pine Mountain lying on this road com- 
manded it. 

June nth. Early in the day the Rebel skirmishers were 
driven back nearer to the base of the mountain, and my lines 
were advanced, but in the afternoon our whole corps was 
moved about a mile to the left so as to make room for the 
Fourth Corps to deploy. In my new position I was on the 
right of our corps, connecting with the Fourth Corps, our 



First Division on my left. My line faced toward the south 
and was located about a mile north of the Marietta and Big 
Shanty road, fronting the northeast end of Pine Mountain. 

June 1 2th and 13th. No movement took place upon our 
portion of the line. June 14th, our whole line advanced, and 
upon my left reached the Big Shanty road where it intrenched. 
Directly in front on the south side of the road, the strongly 
built lines of the enemy, stretching from the base of Pine 
Mountain to the east, were discovered at a few hundred yards 
distant. My right, nearer to the mountain, was strongly re- 
sisted, and, although skirmishing hotly throughout the day 
wtith heavy loss, did not until dark, succeed in dislodging the 
Rebels from their rifle-pits or in gaining the road. June 15th 
the enemy having discovered that our lines were rapidly en- 
veloping his advanced position of Pine Mountain, abandoned it 
in the night, and on the morning of the 15th we took posses- 
sion of that portion of his works. He had only, however, fall- 
en back a short distance to a line of works already constructed, 
but it enabled the Fourth Corps and the two right divisions 
of our Corps to swing forward a considerable distance. My 
own division moved about one and a half miles to the vicinity 
of Smith's house, when it again came upon the pickets in front 
of the Rebel works, and was ordered to intrench and put up 
batteries. I was connected with the troops of Major General 
Howard on my right and with our First Division on my left. 

June 16th and 17th. Gradually driving the enemy from 
the woods and other strong positions held by his advanced 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



297 



parties, I steadily pushed forward my lines and at length es- 
tablished my artillery in positions highly advantageous and 
commanding. During this time the practice of our gunners 
had been skillful and effective. We were again close up to 
the Rebel fortifications and they were of great strength, con- 
structed with extreme care and everywhere fully garnished 
with artillery. They were filled requiring the slow operations 
almost of a siege to approach them. 

June 1 8th. Having been instructed by the corps com- 
mander that Howard, with the Fourth Corps, intended to 
swing forward toward the left, so as to sweep along the ene- 
my's line, I was at the same time ordered to conform to this 
movement and advance with those troops. My line of march 
was through a very difficult wood and morass, nearly a mile 
in width, impassable for the artillery. It was, therefore sent 
around by the left while the troops worked their way through 
the woods. Passing this, we came into open ground imme- 
diately in front of works of the enemy. The Fourth Corps 
at the same time came upon my right and a sharp encounter 
ensued, between our men and the Rebels behind their breast- 
works, but the unceasing and rapid fire of our line kept their's 
subdued, and our loss was less than could have been expected. 

I immediately ordered my men to creep forward as well 
as they could and construct a cover for themselves on the 
crest of the open ground facing directly into the embrasures 
of the Rebel batteries. Having no artillery with me Captain 
Hubert Dilger, of the First Ohio Artillery, belonging to the 



First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps volunteered to bring- 
up his guns, and placing them upon the line where my men 
were intrenching, opened fire and maintained them there 
throughout the afternoon, displaying a splendid courage not 
often witnessed. The coolness and bravery displayed by my 
own men, exceeds all praise, and by dark they had construct- 
ed a line or rifle-pits in open ground confronting the finished 
works of the enemy within 500 yards of them. I had obtained 
a magnificent position and lost 40 men in so doing. 

June 19th. The earliest dawn revealed to us another 
evacuation and falling back of the Rebel army, this time to 
the lines of Kenesaw Mountain. My division, pursuing, came 
up in front of the central knob of the mountain, near Kirk's 
house, and, after a sharp skirmish, got into position close to 
the base of the mountain. 

June 20th. The lines of the division were rectified and 
the works for protection strengthened and improved. During 
the day we lost 30 men, killed 'and wounded by shells and by 
sharpshooters firing from the side of the mountain. From 
this time until the evening of the 26th our position was not 
materially changed. 

Under direct fire from the Rebel skirmishers no man 
could expose himself without being a mark for their bullets. 
The)' kept our men closely confined to their trenches, and the 
only variety we had was the constant succession of artillery 
duels between our batteries and those on the mountain top, 
which might be looked for at any time of the day or night. 



298 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



At times these displays assumed a degree of magnificence, 
as particularly the cannonade from our own batteries on the 
afternoon of the 21st. My average daily loss of men killed 
and wounded in their camps, and behind their works was about 
20 men. June 26th the division of Brigadier General Davis 
having been sent to the right of the Fourth Corps to unite with 
a division of that corps in an assault of the enemy's works, I 
was ordered there likewise to support him, and, being relieved 
after dark by Brigadier General Osterhaus' Division of the 
Fifteenth Corps, I marched at once and by midnight I got into 
bivouac near department headquarters. June 27th at an early 
hour my division was formed in rear of the assaulting column 
of Davis to support him in case of disaster, and after his 
repulse went forward into line on his right, relieving Geary's 
Division of the Twentieth Corps, which was next to us upon 
that side. On the 27th Colonel VanDerveer, commanding my 
Second Brigade, who had long been suffering from disease, 
was compelled to go north for relief, and turned over his 
command to Colonel N. Gleason, of the Fighty-seventh In- 
diana, who has since retained it. In losing Colonel VanDer- 
veer, my command and the service generally, was deprived of 
one of its most gallant and best officers, and most accomplish- 
ed gentlemen. Alway prompt, judicious and brave he had dis- 
tinguished himself on many fields, and his promotion has been 
strongly urged upon the Government, but unaccountedly over- 
looked. 



June 28th. From this time until the 3rd of July the locality 
of the division was not changed. Our works were at this time 
so close to those of the enemy that no man on either side dared 
show his head during the day, and the only advantage which 
we gained was in the constant pushing forward of our trenches 
toward theirs, done under cover of night. To exhibit the 
changes which had taken place in the division up to this period 
and its subsequent strength, a new table of the effective force, 
taken from reports of July 4th. 

July 3rd, the enemy having again abandoned his works 
and fallen back during the night, my men entered them before 
daybreak and were prompt in pursuit, capturing a large num- 
ber of prisoners. We marched at an early hour, and passing 
through Marietta, had advanced about two miles along the 
right side of the railroad when we came upon a new line of 
works in which the Rebel army had taken position. It was 
here that the last stand to cover the passage of the trains over 
Chattahoochie was made. July 4th was spent in reconnoitering 
this position. 

Our troops were pressed close up to the works and a con- 
stant skirmish was kept up along our front during the day, 
but no general assault was made. At this point my second bri- 
gade was detached and sent to Marietta to constitute the gar- 
rison of that place. July 5th the enemy, not waiting for an 
attack had again given up his laboriously constructed works 
and retreated to the river during the night. So soon as this 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



299 



was discovered our troops pursued, my division taking a road 
leading to Vinning's Station and lying a short distance south 
of the railroad. Prisoners were taken and stragglers picked 
up almost from the outset, and some distance before reaching 
Vinning's the head of my column came upon a strong rear 
guard of the enemy. The Tenth Indiana, skirmishing in our 
front pressed this party handsomely .and vigorously, driving 
it beyond the road, and the conduct of Colonel Marsh B. 
Taylor, commanding that regiment on this occasion is worthy 
of praise. On reaching the heights overlooking the station a 
Rebel train was discovered moving south beyond the river, and 
one of my batteries, hastily brought up, shelled it with much 
apparent effect. My line of march would at this point have 
led me to cross the railroad and move in the direction of 
Pace's Ferry, but encountering the head of Wood's Division 
of the Fourth Corps, which came down that road and arrived 
soon after I did, his column, to avoid confusion, was turned 
to the left toward Pace's Ferry whilst mine turning to the 
right, pursued the railroad. I had marched about one and a 
half miles along this road skirmishing lightly but not strongly 
resisted, when I came upon the head of our First Division 
(Fourteenth Corps) column, which taking a shorter road, 
was coming in on my right and reached the railroad in front 
of me. 

These troops immediately abutted upon the strong Rebel 
works on the road, a part of the continuous line, constituting 
the tete-de-pont of the railroad crossing. My troops were then 



formed, by direction of the major general commanding the 
corps, so as to connect with the left of the First Division, and 
extending back along the line of the railroad. July 6th, 7th 
-8th, during these days while other portions of the army were 
working themselves into position, this division remained sta- 
tionary, the skirmish lines alone keeping up a constant and 
continuous fire from their pits. July 9th, having received 
orders to push out my skirmishers and feel the enemy for the 
purpose of developing his position I caused Colonel Este, whose 
brigade was the most advanced, to deploy a heavy line and 
supporting it by a regiment, directed him to make the advance 
required. I at the same time was informed that the skirm- 
ishers of the First Division on my right would advance with 
ours and I directed those of the First Brigade, although more 
remote from the enemy's works, to keep up their connection 
with Este's left. Having selected the Tenth Kentucky to sup- 
port his advance Colonel Este began his movement at 8 a. m. 
The more advanced pickets of the enemy were readily driven 
back and our men gained some hundreds of yards distance to 
the front. They came, however, upon a very heavy line posted 
in strong pits, and these supported by heavy reserves. The 
troops on the right had at the same time gained a portion of 
the Rebel works, but were almost immediately driven back, 
and the enemy then pushed out in superior force upon my 
men and compelled them to retire almost to their original po- 
sition. The arrival of another regiment again gave us com- 
mand of the position and the Rebels fell back to their pits; 



300 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



but as their presence in considerable force, both in their works 
and in front on their skirmish line, had been ascertained, a 
second advance was not ordered. 

In this little fight, which was brief but severe, we lost 4 
men killed and 19 wounded. Colonel Este, who commanded 
the line in person, was severely bruised by a bullet and nar- 
rowly escaped losing his leg. He displayed the utmost bravery 
as did the officers and men generally who were engaged. In 
the afternoon I advanced my whole line and intrenched it and 
the Fourth Corps connected with me on my left. 

July 10th. The passage of the river some miles above 
having been at length effected by the 23rd Corps, the last of 
the Rebels were withdrawn to the south bank during the prev- 
ious night and the bridges burned. General Howard then 
moved his troops to the support of the 23rd Corps, and my 
Division replaced his at Pace's Ferry. I moved into this po- 
sition before night. July nth. From this date until the 17th 
my command remained stationary, picketing the riverbank. 
In the interval the Twenty-third Missouri, assigned by Major 
General Thomas to my First Brigade, came up and joined the 
command. The Second Brigade likewise came forward from 
Marietta, leaving the Second Minnesota at that place and 
joined the division. In the same interval General Turchin 
was compelled to go north for the benefit of his health, and 
the command of the brigade devolved on Colonel M. B. Walk- 
er, Thirty-first Ohio, who has retained it until this time. July 
17th. Pontoon bridges having been completed at Pace's Ferry, 



and the Fourth Corps from above having cleared the opposite 
shore, we crossed the river, the First and Second Divisions 
preceding mine. July 18th the corps advanced, passing Nancy's 
Creek at Kyle's Ferry, and encamped at night with our ad- 
vance at Howell's Mill on Peach Tree Creek, the Twentieth 
Corps being a little above us on our left. 

July 19th. The most of the day was spent in reconnoiter- 
ing the creek, which was deep, and, the bridges being de- 
stroyed, the passage was difficult. In front of Howell's Mill, 
the point occupied by the First Division, Fourteenth Corps, 
the crossing was strongly disputed, and the character of the 
ground admitted of such easy defense that to have forced a 
passage must have been hazardous and attended with much 
loss. In the afternoon, however, the Second Division suc- 
ceeded in getting over lower down and I being in reserve sent 
my First Brigade to cross with it. I had been directed -by 
Major General Thomas to cross my division at that place, but 
on going there and finding it occupied by General Davis, the 
order was modified by the corps commander and a single one 
of my brigade sent to support him. 

The brigade, having crossed, got into position about dark, 
after a brisk skirmish on the left of the Second Division. The 
Twentieth Corps higher up the stream, had likewise got over, 
during the afternoon, and this doubtless induced the force in 
front of General Johnson to retire. As soon as it had done 
so I ordered my Second and Third Brigade to pass to the 
front of him and cross at the mill. I beean the movement 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



301 



soon after dark, being obliged in the first place to build a 
temporary bridge, and by midnight had the two brigades well 
intrenched upon the heights on the south side of the creek. 
July 20th at daylight Johnson's Division crossed over and 
went into position on my left ; it also made connection with 
the Twentieth Corps on the other flank. 

I at the same time moved forward my Third Brigade and 
forming it on the left of the First which had crossed with 
the command of General Davis, pushed the two out and took 
possession of an important range of wooded hill, a half mile 
to the front of my first location. 

As these troops went into position and indeed throughout 
the day they were subject to a very galling fire from the 
Rebel batteries which were posted beyond the ridge out of our 
reach. To enable these two brigades to make still farther 
advance I posted my two batteries at a point on Johnson's front 
from which they would have a cross fire upon the wooded 
ground over which the troops must pass. The batteries had 
gone into position but had not opened fire, when the great as- 
sault made that day on the Twentieth Corps and the First 
Division of our Corps took place, and they did good service 
in aiding to repel the attack. No part of the Rebel assaulting 
columns reached my lines, but throughout the whole attack and 
until dark my troops were subjected to an artillery fire as con- 
stant and a terrible as any that I have ever witnessed, and 
the loss in the division from this cause and upon the skirmish 
line was considerable. Throughout the whole bath my officers 



and my men behaved themselves with a degree of coolness 
and heroism highly commendable and showing themselves to 
be veteran soldiers. (July 21, about this time the batteries were 
relieved from duty with the division and ordered to report to 
corps headquarters.) July 21st. After a hot skirmish of 
some hours my lines were again moved forward nearly a mile, 
established and intrenched at a short distance from the works 
of the enemy, in a position so advantageous and commanding 
that it must have contributed largely in compelling him to 
retire. 

July 22nd. During the night previous the Rebel army fell 
back finally from our front into the works about Atlanta, and 
my division, marching forward until it came to the Marietta 
and Atlanta road, followed it until it struck the railroad two 
miles from the city. We there came up with the First Divi- 
sion, Fourteenth Corps, whose advance was then skirmishing 
close up to the line of works surrounding that place. The 
Twentieth Corps was immediately to the left, and the Army 
of the Tennessee some miles eastward on the Augusta railroad. 
I immediately received orders from Major General Thomas to 
move to the south along the west side of the town until I came 
with that leading from White Hall to the latter place, and 
there to post my command. This point was without opposi- 
tion, and my troops were put in position under the supervision 
of the department commander, who had come to that place. 

The Second Division on arriving formed on my right a 
little retired, and all of our troops intrenched themselves dur- 



302 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



ing the afternoon, so as to be covered while within camp 
from the shells and sharp shooters of the enemy. It was at 
this time that the great battle with the Army of the Tennessee, 
in which the gallant McPherson was killed, took place, and we 
waited anxiously, expecting orders to take part in it. 

July 23rd. From this date until August 3rd the general 
location of the division was not changed. A constant and 
venomous skirmish was kept up between the pickets on both 
sides, and our lines were so close that our men in camp were 
at any moment that they exposed themselves liable to be picked 
off by the enemy's riflemen. Our 'batteries and those upon 
the rebel forts kept up an unceasing exchange of compliments, 
so that our daily loss in killed and wounded in camp was not 
inconsiderable. Numerous .20-pounder shells and shells of 64 
pounds weight from the "old 32-pounder rifle" came regularly 
into our camp, a weight of metal entirely out of proportion 
to our light field pieces. While in this position two regiments 
of the First Brigade, the Fighty-Second Indiana and the 
Twenty-Third Missouri, drove the enemy, after sharp skirm- 
ishing, from some wooded heights on our right and in front, 
which they fortified and held until turned over to the Second 
Division. These hills were not properly in our front, but. in 
the hands of the enemy, were annoying to us, and the regi- 
ments deserve honorable mention for this service. 

On the 27th the Army of the Tennessee passed around 
our rear and took position on our right, and on the 28th was 
attacked by the rebel army in force, making one of the chief 



battles of the campaign. A single change in the strength of 
my command took place at that time — the Thirty-Fifth Ohio 
being ordered to Vining's Station, on August 3rd, never after- 
ward returning, 'being mustered out at that point. 

August 3rd, the Fourteenth Corps having received orders 
to move to the extreme right of the army, with a view of 
forming a column of support upon the right flank of Scho- 
field's command, to protect, cover and sustain him in certain 
offensive operations which he proposed to carry into execu- 
tion, marched on this morning. My division, in the rear of 
the other two, came up with them already encamped about 
two miles to the north of Utoy Creek, and passing through 
them, and also through the lines of Cox's Division, of the 
Twenty-Third Corps, the head of my column came up to the 
creek near an old mill. On the way I was informed that 
Hascall's Division, of the same corps, was about to cross the 
stream, and I was ordered to move my column so as to cover 
his right flank. When I arrived at his position he had already 
gotten over with but little resistance, and was establishing his 
line on the first range of open hills to the left of the road. It 
was then about 5 p. m., when meeting Major General Sher- 
man, I was ordered by him to put my division in line on 
Hascall's right, but to throw back my own right so as to rest 
on the creek. This order was at once carried into execution, 
yet it was quite dark before all the troops got into position, 
my line taking the highest ground stretched along the road for 
the length of a brigade beyond Hascall, and then bent to the 
rear. Its length was so great that I was required to put all 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



303 



my troops in a single line, while the division just formed on 
my left was compactly formed and held a brigade in reserve. 
This disposition I thought strange, since I had been sent out 
simply to support another division while it performed a cer- 
tain work. 

August 4th, in the morning my lines were rectified so as 
to conform better to the grounds, the batteries were put in 
position, and the works thrown up during the night strength- 
ened. About mid-day, as no movement of the troops on my 
left seemed to be in preparation, although I was told that an 
advance was contemplated, I reported in person at the head- 
quarters of the corps, two miles back of the creek, and while 
there I saw the First and Second Divisions of the corps just 
moving out and passing toward the front. I then returned 
to my command 'and soon after received a written order from 
General Palmer, directing me to adance my right with a view 
to gaining high ground on my right front, informing me that 
General Morgan would cross the creek on my right and sup- 
port my movement. It also stated that this movement was 
intended as a preliminary to an advance upon the enemy's 
works, should that be judged expedient or ordered and for 
which I would be expected to furnish the assaulting column. 
It further directed me to push out my skirmishers and begin 
the movement as soon as Morgan should begin crossing. A 
little later I received another written order, also from General 
Palmer, stating that it was intended that I should push out 
with Hascall as far as possible and reconnoiter the enemy's 
works, and directing me to attack in column if the works 



could be carried. The first part of these instructions had 
already been carried out before the order was received, for 
I had the night previous taken possession of all the high 
ground in that vicinity, and it only remained for me to await 
the other contingencies — the arrival of Morgan or the ad- 
vance of Hascall. I had made full preparations, and was 
waiting accordingly, when about 4 p. m. General Palmer came 
up in person and asked me if my brigade was ready for the 
reconnaisance. I replied that no special mention had been 
made of sending out a brigade on. that duty, and asked if he 
wished me to send one. He replied that he did, and I at once 
detailed Colonel Gleason's Brigade for that purpose. The 
brigade was formed in the shortest possible time in two lines, 
with a strong skirmishing party in front, and at once moved 
out. The operation was vigorously conducted and two lines 
of skirmish pits captured. The party kept on until the loca- 
tion and character of the rebel main line was fully developed 
and a heavy fire of artillery and musketry drawn from it. 
This accomplished, and no movement whatever of the troops 
on our left having been made, and no tidings of Morgan, I 
at dark directed Colonel Gleason to bring his men back, to 
their works, leaving his skirmishers in the first pits. Colonel 
Gleason and his officers and men deserve the highest praise 
for the manner in which this affair was conducted. They 
brought in 25 prisoners, and the brigade sustained a loss of 
26 in killed and wounded. 

August 5th, at 4:30 o'clock in the morning, I received, 
directly from General Schofield, commanding the Twenty- 



3°4 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Third Corps, an order prescribing movements for the Four- 
teenth and Twenty-Third Corps upon that day, embracing 
operations proposed for this division, and I at once wrote a 
note to him stating that I knew of no authority under which 
he could assume to give orders to mv division, which belonged 
to the Army of the Cumberland, but informing him that I 
would communicate his wishes to my commanding officer. As 
the order of Schofield detailed at length operations for all 
troops acting on the right of the army, and being always 
anxious to perform my part in whatever may be calculated to 
promote the success of our arms, I immediately went to my 
troops to prepare them for the execution of the orders in case 
they should receive proper sanction of my commander, or to 
be in readiness to co-operate on my own responsibility, in 
any movement which the troops near me might undertake. 
The order from Schofield, alluded to above, directed me tc 
move at 6 a. m., to push forward my whole line, conforming 
it to the direction of that of the enemy, and, driving his 
skirmishers, to press on until I had drawn the fire of his line. 
The Second Division, commanded by General Morgan, 
was directed to support my right in the movement and, if 
possible, to prolong my line when formed. I was also di- 
rected to move without reference to my connection with Has- 
call, as Cox would stand ready to fill any interval between us. 
It was 4 130 a. m. when I gave notice to Schofield that I did 
not recognize his authority, and both his 'headquarters and 
those of our corps were within a mile of mine, yet it was not 
until 6:30 a. m. that he wrote me another note, saying that 



my corps commander would communicate the order to me 
properly, and at about 7 a. m. notice was given me that the 
corps would act during the day under the direction of Scho- 
field. About that time 1 found the head of Cox's column well 
closed up in rear of my left, but I was informed that Hascall 
would make no movement during the day as his lines were 
already so close to the enemy that a farther advance was not 
possible. When I did finally receive authentic orders from 
my commanding officer for a movement I had not yet heard 
from Morgan, who was to move on my right flank. I did not 
know how far below us he had crossed the creek, nor how 
far distant he might be, but convinced from my experience 
the day before that, if anything was to be accomplished I 
must act independently of connections, taking care of my own 
flanks, I instructed my officers accordingly. 

The reconnaisance of the night previous had made us 
thoroughly acquainted with the ground we were to pass over, 
as well as the position which we wished to take up. and it 
took but a short time to prepare for the work. A doubly 
strong skirmish line was thrown from each brigade, supported 
by heavy reserves, and the troops were prepared to follow. 
A perfect understanding was established between the officers 
along the line, and at a signal given about 8 o'clock the skirm- 
ishers dashed forward. The more distant rifle pits which had 
been taken the evening before, but not held by us, had been 
reoccupied by a largely increased force and much strength- 
ened, with orders to the rebel officers in charge to hold them 
to the last extremity. This order, by keeping them there. 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



305 



enabled us to take more prisoners than we would otherwise 
have clone. Our men were met by a very heavy fire, but 
pushed on so rapidly that the struggle was of short duration, 
and a few minutes put us in possession of all the ground up 
to within short musket-range of the rebel main works. With 
the capture of the rebel skirmish line the forward movement 
of my troops was brought to an end, but their exposure to the 
fire of the main works did not cease. The regiments being 
brought up to take position and intrench themselves upon the 
new line were subjected throughout the day to a galling mus- 
ketry fire from the rebel main works, as well as from his 
batteries, from which our loss was considerable. 

In the very handsome charge of the skirmish line, Cap- 
tain Michael Sto'ne, Thirty-First Ohio, commanded the skirm- 
ishers of the First Brigade: Major R. C. Sabine, Eighty- 
Seventh Indiana, those of the Second Brigade, and Major 
William Irving, Thirty-Eighth Ohio, those of the Third 
Brigade, deserve special mention for their gallantry. Major 
Irving was wounded in the leg, which has since been ampu- 
tated, and a little later in the day the brave Lieutenant Colonel 
Myron Baker, commanding the Seventy-Fourth Indiana, was 
shot dead whilst putting his regiment in line. My casualties 
amounted in all to 5 officers and 78 enlisted men killed and 
wounded, whilst we captured about 140 prisoners. 

All engaged in this affair both officers and men behaved 
handsomely as men could do and are deserving the highest 
praise. When I first got into position the Second Division 
had not yet come up, and my two right regiments were re- 



fused so far as to cover that flank ; but later, when those 
troops did arrive, all were brought up on the same line. 
Whilst I was making my advance, and throughout the day 
until dark, no movements were made by the troops of the 
Twenty-Third Corps on my left, although the line of rebel 
rifle pits, captured by my men extended along Hascall's front, 
and could have been carried 'easily by a charge simultaneously 
with mine. They were the same pits which were taken two 
days later by our troops of our First Division, Fourteenth 
Corps. 

August 6th, about daybreak in the morning, the troops of 
the Twenty-Third Corps were withdrawn from my left to be 
transferred to the extreme right, and were replaced by the 
First Division of our corps, commanded by General King. 
The operations of the two corps for that day were again de- 
tailed and promulgated in a lengthy order from Schofield 
issued the night previous, but as the part to be performed by 
my division was dependent upon the movements of Cox and 
Hascall, who were expected to turn the enemy's left flank or 
to break through his line in the vicinity of the Sandtown road, 
and as those movements did not appear to be carried into 
execution, my men remained in their works. It was on the 
same day that Major General Palmer relinquished the com- 
mand of the Fourteenth Corps and turned it over to Brigadier 
General Johnson. 

August 7, the First Division having made arrangements 
to push out and take the skirmish pits of the enemy corre- 
sponding with those captured by my men on the 5th, I or- 



306 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



tiered a strong demonstration along my whole line to aid them. 
In some places my works were so close to those of the rebels 
that the men could not go out of them, but in others the 
skirmishers were pressed out so strongly and a sharp encoun- 
ter of some duration ensued. It ended in my advancing my 
left regiments, some 200 yards, and those on the right which 
had been retired came up on the line with the others. General 
Morgan moved forward at the same time and our divisions 
joined near the junction of the Sandtown and Lick Skillet 
roads. In the operations of that day I lost 66 men killed and 
wounded. The loss of the First Division was of course heavy, 
but it gained both prisoners and advanced position. I have 
been thus minute and circumstantial in my narrative of events 
since coming in contact with the Twenty-Third Corps, inas- 
much as complaint was made to the Major General, command- 
ing the Department of the Cumberland, that the Fourteenth 
Corps had failed to accomplish its portion of the work- 
marked out, when, in fact, every advantage of any kind that 
was gained from the time we moved to right up to the 8th 
of August was achieved by the Fourteenth Corps. 

August 8th, from this date until the 26th, the general 
position and disposition of my troops was not changed. The 
necessary location of our camps was such that they were ex- 
posed constantly to the enemy's fire, and there were few points 
at which a man could show himself without risk of being shot. 
On certain portions of the line a temporary truce would be 
arranged with the troops that chanced to be in front, whilst 



at others a vicious skirmish would be kept up and for days 
the men would be imprisoned in their trenches, not daring to 
show their heads above the parapet, and this varied by the fire 
of artillery or more active demonstrations begun by one or the 
other party. In this passive condition with no operations on 
hand our daily reports presented not unfrequently a list of 
10, 20 or 30 casualties, and a long continuance of the confine- 
ment and privations were extremely trying, yet the men bore 
all with a degree of cheerfulness, patience and heroism that 
can find its reward only in the consciousness of duty well per- 
formed and of devotion to the holy cause in which they were 
engaged. During our long stay in such close proximity to the 
enemy, deserters from their lines, chiefly from Alabama regi- 
ments, came in constantly and in large numbers. They finally 
became so numerous that the most strenuous means were re- 
sorted to by the rebel officers to prevent them. 

On the 22nd of August, Brigadier General Davis, having 
received the brevet of Major General and been assigned 
to the command of the Fourteenth Corps, relieved General 
Johnson, who was transferred out of the corps. 

:k & ik :k :k & :!: %. %; % 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. Baird, 
Brigadier General, Commanding Division. 
Capt. A. C. McClurg, 

Assistant Adjutant General. 



Letter from Justice John M. Harlan, our former 
Brigade Commander 



Washington, D. C, Oct. 7, 1911, 

Mr. J. B. Shaw, Secretary, Etc., 

LaFayette, Ind. 
Dear Sir : — Upon my return here recently I found your 
cordial invitation to attend the 34th Annual Reunion of the 
Tenth Regiment of Volunteer Infantry at Frankfort, Ind., on 
September 19th and 20th. At the time the reunion was held 
I was far off in Canada enjoying my vacation and could not 
have been with the "boys" at the time named. I recall with 
very great distinctness my association with the officers and 
men of your gallant regiment. They were very intimate and 
friendly with the officers and soldiers of my regiment — the 
Tenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry. It was a great honor 
for my men to have served with the true men of the Indiana 
regiment. There was no better regiment in the whole Union 
Army than the Tenth Indiana. I happen personally to know 
that General Thomas thought very highly of their patriotism 
and fine fighting qualities. If there should be another reunion 
of the regiment I will endeavor to be present if my public 
duties admit of my absence in a distant State. 

Yours truly, 

John M. Flarlan. 

(The above letter was received six days before his death, and 
is highly prized by the members of the regiment.) 



FIFTY YEARS HAVE COME AND GONE 



Dedicated to the 10th Indiana Volunteers. 
By James A. Price, Co. C. 



Comrades, fifty years ago today 

We took the oath and marched away, 
Fifty years, a long time in the history of a man, 

But in the history of a nation, 
Fifty years is but a span. ' 

Fifty years since first we drew the army ration, 
Yes, since first we put our armor on, 

Fifty years have come and gone. 

Fifty years since we marched south, 

To face the belching cannon's mouth; 
For three long years to hear the rattle, 

Of shot and shell in the hell of battle; 
Fifty years since we bade good-bye to Old Indiana, 
Fathers, sisters, sweethearts and mamma — 
Yes, since first we put our blue suits on, 

Fifty years have come and gone. 

It was at Mill Springs first we met the foe, 

Now almost fifty years ago. 
Where Zollicoffer fought his last, lost and fell, 

Where Col. Kise said, "Boys, Zollicoffer's killed dead as hell,' 
With Old "Pap" Thomas to lead us in the fray, 
We knew full well we'd win the day; 
We drove them from their fort so strong, 

Yes, fifty years have come and gone. 



The last of August, Eighteen Sixty-three, 

Old Rosy's Army crossed the Tennessee; 
Then marched o'er Lookout's rugged height, 

For on the other side we had to be, by Jove! 
Through valleys and gaps we marched day and night, 
And struck the enemy in force in McLemore's Cove. 
Yes, since first we buckled our armor on. 

Fifty years have come and gone. 

On the eve of Sept. 18 we started for Chickamauga and marched 
all night, 

And at sunrise were ordered to strip for the fight. 
With Companies C and H as skirmishers (how their muskets did 

rattle) 
For Major VanNatta had orders to push on and open the battle. 

Without any breakfast we opened the fray, 
And fought without eating all that terrible day. 
Our losses were heavy but we still fought on — 

Yes, fifty years surely have come and gone. 

What! fifty years! Can it be that long? says one; 

Yes, since first we put our blue suits on. 
Sure fifty years have come and gone. 

Now to enjoy the fruit of your victories won. 
My wish is that you old Comrades, every one, 
May be permitted to live on and on, 
And meet each year as time rolls along, 

'Till a full hundred years have come and gone. 



CHAPTER XIII 



Biographical 



Joseph M. Swope, Company I. 

Joseph Marion Swope was born October 10, 1842, near 
Elizaville, Boone Count}', Indiana. His father, Ebenezer H. 
Swope, was born in Estill County, Kentucky, in the year 1812, 
and there married in 1830 Luanda Robertson, whose birth 
occurred in 18 10. 

The father of Lucinda Robertson (Swope) was born on 
the banks of the Potomac, where the city of Richmond, Va., 
now stands. His father, John Robertson, was among the first 
of the Revolutionary patriots to offer his services and life, if 
need be, to Washington in defense of liberty against British 
oppression and tyranny, and fell while gallantly fighting the 
enemy at Eutaw Springs, S. C. Then it was that the loyal 
spirit of that son burned almost to the consuming point, 
and giving his mother a last farewell went to avenge the death 
of his father. He enlisted in a Virginia company, commanded 
by Captain John Beason, and served the remainder of that 
long struggle, a faithful continental soldier. He witnessed 
the burning of Charlestown, and brought with him marks of 
honor from Monmouth and Camden, from Bennington and 
Saratoga. He crossed with Washington the floating ice of 
the Delaware River on that fateful Christmas night. At Val- 
ley Forge he suffered the most intense hardships human kind 



ever suffered. No artist can picture the agony and despair 
on that boyish face, when his feet became frozen so badly 
that his toes crumbled away. When advised by his com- 
mander to remain for a time, he replied, "No, I am not afraid 
to die, if it be for my country," and onward he marched in 
his crippled condition and participated in the siege of York- 
town and the surrender of Cornwallis. After the close of the 
Revolutionary war he removed to Kentucky, where he helped 
build the fort at Booneville; afterward emigrated to Indiana, 
where he died at the age of 92 years. 

The father of Ebenezer Swope was Joseph Swope, who 
was born in Virginia in 1784, and whose death occurred May 
26, 1877, at the advanced age of 93 years. He served as an 
officer in the war of 1812. Married in his native state Mary 
Hines, who was born on the 15th day of July, 1782, in the 
old dominion. Joseph Swope and family moved to Kentucky 
about the year 18 10, and the death of his wife occurred in 
that State. 

The subject of this sketch, the story of his military ex- 
perience and character as a soldier is given by Captain Felix 
Shumate : 

"Joseph M. Swope was a citizen of Elizaville, or near 
there, when the war of the rebellion broke out, of good family. 




JOSEPH M. SWOPE 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



311 



with only a common school education and only 18 years of 
age. He was more than the average in intellect and a true 
type of the western soldier. Boy as he was, he enlisted in 
my company — I, Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infan- 
try — September 18, 1861, at Lebanon, Incl., and in three days 
was in front of the rebel army in Kentucky. He held the 
position as private soldier, preferring that to any promotions, 
which were offered him on several occasions. 

"Jo, as the boys called him, was honest and conscientious 
and made a true soldier in every sense of the word ; was never 
under arrest, never in hospital and never attended sick call 
while in the service ; made every march his company made, 
was in every skirmish and battle his company was in, including 
Mill Springs, Ky., Rolling Fork, Hartsville, Hoover's Gap, 
Tenn., Corinth, Miss., Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Ring- 
gold, Tunnel Hill, Buzzard Roost, Reseca, Adairsville, King- 
ston, New Hope Church, Chattahoochie, Kenesaw Mountain, 
Peach Tree Creek, Lost Mountain, Utoy Creek, Atlanta, 
Ga., and all the skirmishes on Sherman's Atlanta campaign. 

"I want to mention a few acts of bravery performed by 
Mr. Swope. Early in 1862, at the battle of Mill Springs, his 
first baptism in battle I discovered that he had the peculiar 
qualities of a good soldier. He and Thomas M. Small, of my 
company, were the last to leave the battle field. At Tullahoma, 
Tenn., in June, 1861, Jo, with one or two other members of 
his company, distinguished himself in the heat of battle by 
giving me some valuable information as to a flank movement 



of the enemy. Also at Perryville, Ky., 1862, while my com- 
pany was making a night attack, he, in company with his 
comrades, performed a deed which gave the brigade com- 
mander very valuable information as to the position of the 
enemy. At Chickamauga, Ga., Jo behaved himself most gal- 
lantly, and on Sunday, the 20th, he performed services that 
were scarcely equaled in the annals of the war. He was de- 
tailed, with Wiley Howard, to assist the wounded back to the 
surgeon in the rear, and so well did they do that duty that all 
the wounded of my company were saved and got back to 
Chattanooga and, notwithstanding the fact that the army was 
much broken and scattered and many changes in the lines, he 
came off the field that night with the remnant of his company. 
At Kenesaw Mountain he distinguished himself by standing 
out in a storm of shot and shell and greatly encouraged his 
comrades who were feeling blue. At Utoy Creek, to the right 
of Atlanta, when we charged up close to the rebel works, and 
were short of ammunition, and it looked to be just as 
hazardous to go backward as forward, there came an order to 
send a man after ammunition. I was desirous of obtaining 
information as to the rebel lines. Swope volunteered to go 
and after crawling up run into their pickets, who fired. Swope 
returned the fire and was afterward joined by Corporal Small. 
They found the location of the lines, which was of great im- 
portance to our commanding general. 

"The Orderly Sergeant rose up and said to the boys, 
'I don't feel like detailing a man to go to his death; will any 





As Private Company B, 10th Indiana 
Age 20 



MARTIN V. WERT 



As Captain Company M, 2nd Regiment I. N. 
G. in War with Spain. Age 54 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



3'3 



one volunteer to go?' After a brief pause the answer came 
from Jo, 'I will go,' and go he did, and although his comrade 
that was helping him was knocked senseless by a shell in front 
of him, Jo returned to the company with the box of cartridges. 
I could write more but health forbids." 

After the war Air. Swope attended school for some time, 
and then began farming on rented land, teaching for several 
years during winter seasons. His first purchase of real estate 
consisted of twenty acres, to which he made additions from 
time to time until eventually he became possessor of 384 acres 
which, under his successful labors and management, have been 
brought to a high state of cultivation. He is an active mem- 
ber of the G. A. R. and the Masonic fraternities, affiliates with 
the Republican- party, is an ardent friend and liberal patron 
of all public enterprises, having for their object the moral and 
material well being of Boone County, and to him as much as 
to an)' one man is the county indebted for its present excellent 
system of gravel roads. He was united in marriage Septem- 
ber 17, 1871, to Miss Patsey Garrett, who was born in Mont- 
gomery County, Kentucky, May 25, 1854, the daughter of 
Benjamin F. Garrett. To this union four children have been 
born to them, as follows: Ora, March 13, 1873; Alva D., 
May 28, 1875, died October 14, 1880; Edith, February 1, 1877, 
and Harlan, April 20, 1879, died August 12, 1881. 



Martin V. Wert, Company B. 

Martin V. Wert was born in Fountain County, Indiana, 
July 17, 1841, his parents being Henry and Isabelle Wert. 
The principal part of his life prior to his entry into the army 
was spent on the farm. He attended the county schools, and 
graduated in the Fountain County High School in i860. 

October I, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company B, 
Tenth Indiana Infantry, and served with that organization 
until September 5, 1864, at which time he was transferred to 
Company B, Fifty-Eighth Indiana Infantry, serving in that 
organization until November 1, 1864, at which time he was 
honorably mustered out of the service, having served three 
years and one month. His company received the brunt of 
battle at Perryville, being on the left of the regiment and 
suffered the heaviest loss of any company in the regiment, of 
four killed and seven wounded. After- the regiment left Tus- 
cumbia, Ala., in July, 1862, and stopped for a few days near 
Huntsville, Ala., Lieutenant Snyder, M. V. Wert and Fleet 
Martin, Company B, with two men from each of the other 
companies of the regiment, and ten men from the Fourth 
Kentucky, ten from the Tenth Kentucky and ten from the 
Fourteenth Ohio, were detailed to take a special train of ten 
cars and get 500 bales of cotton at Decatur, Ala., some forty 
miles down the Tennessee River. The men were told to take 



314 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



sixty rounds of ammunition and one day's rations. They 
were given to understand that they must not be captured. 
They were to be ready to start at 3 o'clock a. m., which was 
before daylight at that time. They were also told that 500 
of our cavalry had gone to the same place, starting at noon 
the day before, and that a heavy wagon train had gone with 
the cavalry. The men started, got the cotton on the train, 
running very slow and making no noise on the way there, but 
on the way back the engine and soldiers made plenty of noise. 
The detail arrived safely with the cotton. They saw large 
numbers of the "Johnnies" at a distance and used plenty of 
ammunition on them. A large force of our cavalry was scat- 
tered at points along the line which saved the detail from 
being killed or captured. They pressed in a large number of 
"darkies" to handle arid load the cotton, throwing out pickets 
in all directions on all roads to prevent a surprise, but the 
pickets were not attacked until on the way back, when squads 
of Confederate cavalry would be seen at some distance away. 
They fired on the train, but a few shots from the Enfield rifles 
would soon drive them out of sight. This raid was widely 
reported in the papers at the time and strongly condemned by 
the rebel press. The brigade wagon master, W. K. Harris, 
Company B, Tenth Indiana, had been sent with the cavalry 
to gather in the cotton and he stated he was glad we came for 
it because he did not believe he could have returned to the 
army without being captured. 

The above engraving is of M. V. Wert, who had charge 
of the squad from the Tenth Indiana and was posted on one 



of the roads on the outskirts of the town while the cotton was 
being loaded. He also had charge of one car of cotton on the 
return and made a barricade of cotton bales at the car doors 
for protection. It required a great deal of tact and courage 
to carry out the orders given. On another occasion he was 
selected for a very perilous and hazardous job, which was to 
take a large drove of cattle from Marietta to Atlanta in the 
early part of September, 1864. The distance was some 25 
or 30 miles. The detail consisted of some 300 men. They 
were two days getting through, being compelled to skirmish 
with the rebels the whole distance. At times it looked as 
though the enemy would capture the bunch, but our cavalry 
came out and cleared the road the remainder of the way to 
Atlanta. When the regiment returned home Wert was trans- 
ferred to the Fifty-Eighth Indiana, with which command he 
served the remainder of his three years, being discharged 
November 1, 1864. 

After the close of the war he learned the carpenter trade 
and moved to Crawfordsville in 1870. and has been in the 
contracting business ever since; was elected to the Common 
Council of the city of Crawfordsville for the term of two 
years in 1901 ; was elected Mayor of Crawfordsville for four 
years, taking his office January 1, 1910, and is at the present 
time occupying that position. He was elected First Lieuten- 
ant, Company D, First Regiment, Indiana National Guard, in 
August, 1887, serving in this organization three years. This 
company was transferred to the Second Regiment. I. N. G.. 
and assigned as Company I. ; was elected Captain of this com- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



315 



pany for three years ; was again appointed Captain, Company 
M, Second Regiment, I. N. G., May 24, 1897, by Governor 
Mount. At the outbreak of the war with Spain his regiment 
was sent to the front April 26, 1898, serving until the war 
ended. He was a number one soldier and a first-class citizen, 
honored and respected by all, a hero of two wars. 

Captain Thomas A. Cobb. 

Thomas A. Cobb was born in Harrison County, Ohio, on 
his father's farm, January 21, 1837, received a good education 
in Ohio and afterward attended the Thorntown Academy and 
Duff's Mercantile College, Pittsburg, Pa. 

At the age of seventeen he located in Boone County, 
Indiana, and assisted his father in clearing up his farm and 
was early inured to hard work. In August, 1861, he enlisted 
at the age of 24 years in Company A, Tenth Indiana Infantry, 
and was elected First Lieutenant of his company. He held 
this position until November 18, 1862, when he was commis- 
sioned Captain, caused by the resignation of Captain James 
H. Hamilton on that date. Captain Cobb was an excellent 
officer, rather of a retiring disposition, yet congenial when in 
company with others. In battle he was always cool and de- 
liberate in his actions, brave in the extreme but not reckless. 
His men had perfect confidence in him and would stand by 
him under the most trying circumstances. 

He was present at and participated in all the battles in 
which the regiment was engaged, viz. : Mill Springs, Ky., 



Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, Boonville, Miss., Perryville, Ky., 
Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga, Ga. (two days), Mission Ridge, 
Tenn., Tunnel Hill, Buzzard Roost, Kingston, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and Atlanta, Ga. At Chick- 
amauga his company saved the battery (C, First Ohio) from 
capture by dragging the guns away by hand. 

In all his military service he was a brave and discreet 
officer and won the respect of the entire regiment. After a 
service of three years and one month he was honorably mus- 
tered out September 19, 1864. 

After his return from the army he resumed farming in 
Boone County. He was married to Julia A. Wilharm, daugh- 
ter of Gotlieb and Amelia (Zumphe) Wilharm. Captain Cobb 
has made an enviable record as a leading educator of Boone 
County. He began teaching in Marion Township in 1857. 
In 1859 he went to Missouri, where he taught school and re- 
turned to Marion Township and continued to teach up to time 
of his enlistment in the army. After the war he taught school 
for six years in the home district. In the spring of 1865 he 
settled on his farm, consisting at that time of 120 acres, and 
has gradually added thereto until he now owns 400, one of 
the finest farm properties in Boone County. 

Politically he was a Douglas Democrat, but voted for 
Greeley in 1872, and afterward for Peter Cooper. He then 
voted for Ben Harrison and is now a Populist. He is a mem- 
ber of Rich Mountain Post No. 42, Lebanon, Ind., and a 
member of the Knights of Pythias. 



316 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



From the union six children were born, Addie A. and 
Eva A. (twins). Emma B., George M., Thomas A., and Julia 
L.. all living. His wife died August 24. 1893. 

John Lawkie. 

John Lawrie was born in the City of New York in the 
year 1825. His father was born in Scotland and his mother 
was born in Duchess County, New York. Her father and his 
three brothers were in the Continental Army. Two of them 
were commissioned officers, they served under General 
Schuyler, afterward under General Gates in the Revolutionary 
war. 

John Lawrie received a good common school education, 
and after serving an apprenticeship at the trade of black- 
smithing and edge toolmaker he then concluded to study for 
the ministry and entered a Universalist Seminary for that 
purpose and graduated. Shortly after this the whole family, 
with the exception of one son, migrated to White County, 
Indiana, and turned their attention to agriculture. Shortly 
after this, in 1853-4, the troubles in Kansas began, when he 
shouldered his rifle and started to join John Brown at Osa- 
watomie, Kan. They had several skirmishes and a number 
killed on both sides. Lawrie and twenty others were cap- 
tured and turned over to the civil authorities, tried before 
Judge Lecompte and convicted of manslaughter. Two of 
them were sentenced to imprisonment for life and Lawrie and 
the others were sentenced for five years hard labor with ball 



and chain. They were guarded by the sheriff in a log cabin 
just outside of the Capital, which was Lawrence, Kan. Dur- 
ing the time the} - were being guarded in this log cabin they 
assisted the two life men to escape during the night and cov- 
ered up the noise made by the escaping convicts in entertain- 
ing the guard by showing him the different drum beats. When 
word got out that the life prisoners had escaped the Border 
Ruffians would occasionally take a shot at the prisoners if one 
of them happened to step outside the cabin for fresh air and 
exercise. The prisoners then sent one of their number to 
Lawrence to purchase arms with which to defend themselves, 
bribing the guard. 

"Later Governor Geary was informed that these pris- 
oners were armed. The Governor sent a special messenger 
to the prisoners, who told that the Governor had just been 
informed that they were armed and asking them to hold 
themselves in readiness to go to the Governor's rescue at a 
moment's notice. This was the only case in history where 
convicts were the body guard of a governor. They were, 
however, never called upon by the Governor." (The fore- 
going Kansas matter furnished by Hon. John W. Holtzman. 
ex-Mayor of Indianapolis.) 

Mr. Lawrie returned to LaFayette and in April, 1861, 
enlisted as a private in Company E, Captain William Taylor, 
Tenth Indiana, three months' service. At the battle of Rich 
Mountain, Va., July 11, 1861, General Rosecrans had given 
the order to "cease firing." Lawrie saw a rebel "drawing a 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



317 



bead" on Rosecrans, and would undoubtedly have killed him 
had Lawrie not tired and killed the rebel. For this disobedience 
of orders Rosecrans drew his sword and lambasted Lawrie 




WILBUR P. STEVENSON 

over the back. Lawrie said nothing, did not even tell him 
why he had disobeyed orders, but rejoined his company. 

On the reorganization of the Tenth for the three years' 



service Lawrie re-enlisted in Company G. While at Stewart's 
Creek, Tenn., Lawrie was sitting on a trunk, when his captain 
came along, tipped the trunk, throwing Lawrie to the ground. 
For this little pastime he promptly knocked the captain down. 
Lawrie was court-martialed and sentenced to extra camp duty 
with ball and chain. At this time Rosecrans' headquarters 
was at Murfreesboro. Lawrie wrote a piece which was pub- 
lished in the Nashville Lmion, in which he referred to the 
episode at Rich Mountain. He signed his name "Old Tow- 
ser," but was sufficiently specific so "Rosey" could find him 
if he so desired. In due time Rosecrans saw the item, sent 
orders for Lawrie to report to him at Murfreesboro, which 
he did and was promptly released from arrest and placed on 
duty at headquarters. Upon his return to the regiment he 
was transferred to Company R, and was honorably discharged 
September 19, 1864. 

He was a brave soldier and a verv intelligent man, quiet 
and not given to exploitation of his services. 

Wilbur F. Stevenson. 

Mr. Stevenson was born in Scott County, Kentucky, No- 
vember 12, 1842. Parents, Evan Stevenson and Lydia Boggs 
Stevenson. The family moved to Benton County, Indiana, in 
1856. He attended school at the "Battle Ground" in i860 
and 1861. He enlisted in Company D. Tenth Indiana In- 
fantry, September 6, 1861 ; was made Corporal and later pro- 
moted to Sergeant. His service was marked by nothing of 



*I* 



HISTORY OE THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



unusual interest until the battle of Chickamauga, where he 
"stopped a bullet with his knee." After partial recovery he 
did hospital duty at Madison, Ind., until the expiration of his 
term of enlistment. He went to school in LaFayette in 1865. 
Moved to Piatt County, Illinois, in 1868. Married Alice Tall- 
man in 1871. Has five children — Evan Stevenson, born in 
1872; Mrs. W. H. Dilatush, born in 1876; Mrs. C. B. Cald- 
well, born in 1883; Mrs. J. W. Ayre, born in 1884; Mrs. E. 
J. Hawbaker, born in 1889. He has served terms as Super- 
visor of Piatt County and as Mayor of Monticello, but has 
managed, so far, to "side step the penitentiary." In politics 
he was originally a Republican, but becoming disgusted at the 
mean treatment of the Southern people during the reconstruc- 
tion period he "reformed" (Oh, Lord) and embraced De- 
mocracy. His principal business interests have been farming 
and the feeding of cattle and hogs. 

The above was written by himself. It is a mystery how 
the "political reformation'' of this fellow kept him out of the 
pen. That of itself was a sufficient crime to cause a life 
sentence. 

Captain James H. Boyl. 

Mr. Boyl was born one mile northwest of Kirklin, Clin- 
ton County, Indiana, February 18, 1836. His father, in 1843, 
moved to Michigantown, where he was engaged in the hotel, 
farming and saw mill business. 

Captain Boyl received the first rudiments of education 
from J. N. Sims and his "switch," who afterwards became a 



prominent lawyer of Frankfort, Ind., and a Captain in the 
One Hundredth Indiana Infantry. At the outbreak of the 
rebellion Captain Boyl enlisted as a private in Company C, 
Tenth Indiana, three months' service, under Captain J. W. 
Blake. His was the first name enrolled in the township ; 
served through the campaign in West Virginia and partici- 
pated in the battle of Rich Mountain, which was the first sur- 
render of the war by the rebels. He captured a rebel flag 
and a Bible, which he still holds in his possession. Of his 
conduct in that engagement. Colonel Manson said: "I cannot 
close my report without mentioning the name of Private 
James H. Boyl, of Company C, for great gallantry. 

In August, 1861, the regiment returned home for muster 
out, its term of service having expired. Upon the reorgan- 
ization of the regiment for the three years' service Captain 
Boyl immediately proceeded to raise a company in connection 
with A. O. Miller. He was successful and with his company 
reported at Camp Tippecanoe, LaFayette, and was subse- 
quently sent with the regiment to Indianapolis, being mus- 
tered into the United States service September 18, 1861, with 
J. H. Boyl as Captain. His company, with others of the right 
wing, was moved from Louisville to Lebanon Junction, Ky. 
While at this place Company C was called out to repulse the 
enemy supposed to be lurking on the west bank of Rolling 
Fork. Captain Boyl ordered his company to open fire, which 
they did with telling effect. The result of the fusilade was 
one "calf" riddled with bullets and an Irishman driven "under 
the bed" in a house on the opposite side of the river. He 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



319 



participated in the battle of Mill Springs. Ky., January 19, 
1862, was then sent home on recruiting service and rejoined 
the regiment at Nashville, Tenn., in March, 1862, in command 
of 150 recruits for various regiments. He was with the regi- 
ment in the march to Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., siege of 
Corinth, Miss., Buell's march to Louisville, and the battle of 
Perryville, Ky. December 29, 1862, he participated in the 
engagement with John Morgan at Rolling Fork, Ky. At mid- 
night before the battle of Perryville he came in possession of 
a bucket of honey, which he set down among the sleeping 
soldiers of his company. Soon after the "bees in the honey 
got busy," sending out skirmishers and the first man they 
found intruding on their domain was Cy Clark. There was 
stamping, slapping and swearing, and they were doing their 
utmost to find the man who had set down the bucket of bees 
in their quarters, but their efforts were fruitless until after 
muster out of the service they were then enlighted. 

At the battle of Chickamauga, Capt. Boyl, with Company 
C, and Captain Boswell, with Company H, were sent out in 
the skirmish line. The first shot fired was by one of his com- 
pany, and the first man wounded in the battle belonged to 
Company C (Jasper Berge), and the first man killed was in 
Company H (James Chissom). The credit of bringing on 
that terrific battle belongs to Captains Boyl and Boswell, 
under the command of Major J. H. Van Natta, Tenth Indiana. 

He participated in the battle of Mission Ridge and all 
through the Attlanta campaign. At Vinning's Station, Ga.. he 



had a pipe shot from his mouth, and the "reb" didn't say 
"put that in your pipe and smoke it." He afterward sent the 
pipe to New York for repairs. It was stolen in 1867, but 
subsequently recovered by a friend. After the death of the 
friend, his daughter-in-law returned it to him in 1909, after 
an absence of forty-three years. 

In 1879 Captain Boyl went South and engaged in the 
lumber business, but the panic of 1893 forced him to quit 
business, returning to Indianapolis, where he has since re- 
sided. 

Capt. Jehu W. Perkins. 

Mr. Perkins was born near Lebanon, Boone County, In- 
diana, in the year 1837. He was a graduate of Bloomington 
(now Indiana) University and studied law under "Jack" 
Boone, a well known and famous lawyer. At the outbreak of 
the rebellion he was a partner of Boone in Lebanon, Ind., and 
at once left his law practice to recruit a company for the war. 
In this he was successful and his company was known as 
Company I in the Tenth Indiana Infantry. He was a brave 
and fearless officer and in battle was cool and deliberate. He 
rendered especial service in the capacity of acting major at 
the battle of Chickamauga, being of great assistance to Col- 
onel Marsh B. Taylor, who commanded the regiment, the 
Colonel and Major both being wounded. . 

Captain Perkins was shot on the picket line at Chatta- 
nooga, Tenn., and died November 16, 1863. His death was 
universally mourned by all the regiment. 



320 



HISTOKY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



Captain Felix Shumate. 

Mr. Shumate was born in Spencer County, Kentucky, 
and removed with his parents to Boone County, Indiana, in 
the year 1847, where he spent the remainder of his life. 

On the first call for troops by President Lincoln, Captain 
Shumate enlisted as a private in Companv I, Tenth Indiana 
Infantry, for three months' service, participated in the battle 
of Rich Mountain, W. Va., and returned home August 6, 
1861, at the expiration of his term of service. He immedi- 
ately assisted Captain Perkins in recruiting his company for 
the three years' service and was made First Lieutenant, suc- 
ceeding to the captaincy of the company after the death of 
Captain Perkins. He was present at every battle and skirm- 
ish in which the regiment was engaged, being wounded in the 
battle of Mill Springs during the siege of Corinth and Chick- 
amauga. 

After the expiration of his three years' term of service 
he returned to Lebanon and engaged in business. He was 
the originator of many public enterprises and always at the 
head of every movement for the benefit of the people. He 
served as postmaster at Lebanon under the Harrison admin- 
istration and died at Lebanon December 18, 1895. 

William F. Ruby. 

Son of John O. and Deborah Ruby, was born December 
2. 1838. at LaFayette, Ind., and was reared and educated in 
the public schools of that city. He left LaFayette September 



19, 1856, going to Mexico and Texas and settled in Sherman. 
Texas, where he was engaged in the drug business for four 
years, giving it up to take charge of the postoffice at that 
place, being so employed at the breaking out of the rebellion. 
He left Texas April 12, 1861. for home, reaching LaFayette, 
July 24, 1 80 1. He enlisted in Company E, Tenth Indiana 
Infantry, as a private August 19, 1861, and promoted Commis- 
sary Sergeant in April. 1862, serving in this position until the 
muster out of the regiment September 19, 1864. 

In March, 1865, he was commissioned First Lieutenant 
and Quartermaster of the One Hundred Fifty-Fourth Indiana 
Infantry and sent to the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia. 

At the battle of Chickamauga he went after and brought 
Colonel W. P>. Carroll off the field after he was wounded and 
remained with him until his death, and later had his remains 
brought home to his family. At the battle of Perryville. Ky.. 
October 8, 1862, he carried cartridges to the regiment when 
the boys were short of "blue pills" for the Johnnies. At 
Reseca, Ga., was hit by a rebel sharpshooter and wounded. 

He was sent from Gallatin, Tenn., with a train of rations 
for the troops who had gone after Morgan's band in Mul- 
clragh Hill. Received a telegram to get back to Elizabethtown 
as fast as possible as Morgan was making for the railroad at 
that point to cut off and capture the train and supplies, beat 
him in the race about twenty minutes and saved the train. 

At the close of the war he returned to LaFayette, Ind., 
where he has since resided. ^ r as appointed Captain and Com- 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



321 



missary of the Indiana State Soldiers' Home at LaFayette, 
which position he held for eight years until a change of ad- 
ministration. 

Colonel Marsh B. Taylor. 

Was born March 13, 1835. at LaFayette, Ind. He was 
the eldest son of John and Marv A. ( Brown) Taylor, who 
were pioneers of LaFayette. 

After finishing his education at the State University at 
Bloomington, Ind., his daring and adventurous disposition 
asserted itself and he made several perilous trips to the plains. 
At the age of twelve he joined Walker's Nicaraguan filibus- 
tering expedition, was captured with others and sentenced to 
be shot, but his usual good fortune he succeeded in escaping 
and reached home after many exceedingly thrilling adventures. 

When the first gun of the Civil war was fired it filled his 
heart, as it did many others, with intense love and patriotism. 
At this time he was in Colorado with Kit Carson and took an 
overland stage for home. On the way the stage was held up 
by "Road Agents," and at the muzzle of revolvers and guns 
the passengers were ordered to hold up their hands. Marsh 
being tall and slim was somewhat cramped, and told the rob- 
bers to give a man a chance to straighten out. He drew his 
hands from his trousers pockets and with them two revolvers 
and at once opened fire. Four fell dead, the others mounting 
their ponies started to run. Marsh said, "Give me another 

gun, d it, they will get away." The road being clear the 

stage proceeded on its way. Immediately after arriving home 



he proceeded to raise a company for the war. In this he was 
successful and was elected as its Captain, his company being- 
assigned to the Tenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
and known as Company If. 

At the battle of Mill Springs, Ky., January 19, 1862, he 
was conspicuous for his daring and bravery under fire, and 
was designated by Colonel Kise as one of his "Three Tigers." 
An incident is told of him, that after the news of the victory 
at Mill Springs and his father having heard of his conduct, took 
down his ledger and, turning to Marsh's account, found he 
had advanced Marsh $1,500.00. On the credit side of the 
ledger his father made an entry, "By bravery at Mill Springs, 
$1,500.00," which balanced the account. Throughout his en- 
tire term of service he manifested the same spirit of bravery 
and recklessness. At Chickamauga he was in the thickest of 
the engagement and assumed command of the regiment after 
the death of Colonel Carroll. He led the regiment up Mission 
Ridge when the army was assaulting that stronghold, and 
through the Atlanta campaign. 

When the regiment was first sent to Bardstown, Ky., a 
romance began and continued under the exacting and uncer- 
tain conditions of the first three years of the war, but happily 
culminating in his marriage to Miss Sadie Bishop, November 
28, 1864, at her home in Bardstown. During the ceremony 
the house was surrounded by a guard of soldiers sent from 
Louisville by his commanding officer. He was shot at several 
times on his way to the house, so that it was deemed neces- 



322 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



sary to also guard the train which bore the gallant young offi- 
cer and his girl bride to Louisville, but nothing deterred, 
nothing daunted this brave, fearless heart, he had fought for 
his wife and had won her. Two children were born to this 
union, and they still survive — William John Taylor and Sadie 
Marsh Taylor, now Mrs. James H. Johnson, Jr. 

In March, 1865, he raised the One Hundred Fiftieth In- 
diana Infantry and was commissioned as its Colonel. The 
regiment was sent to the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, doing 
garrison duty principally, being mustered out August 5, 1865, 
by reason of the close of war. After going through the many 
dangers incident to war and escaping all uninjured, was acci- 
dentally killed at Hagensport, Texas, July 20, 1879. 

IN MEMORIAM 

"Soft! on the quiet stillness of the air 
A bugle's notes rise sad and clear, 
A soldier's farewell to his friends 

With the tribute of a falling tear. 

"Yes, rest, thy warfare here is o'er. 

Sleep on thy sleep, for thus hast conquered still, 
Nor victory, nor sting, is there in death 

When humbly we bend to our Father's will." 

From the LaFayette Daily Courier of September 20, 
1879, we find the following: 



"DEATH OE COLONEE MARSH Ii. TAYEOR." 

"The sad news has been received of the death of Colonel 
Marsh B. Taylor, at a small town in Texas, on the 20th inst. 
We have no particulars, nor do we know the cause of his 
death. Colonel Taylor was a man of rare courage, and had 
he been educated in a military school would have been a fit 
person to have rode at the head of an army. He was of a 
roving disposition, and crossed the plains to California when 
a mere boy. The hardships he endured on these campaigns 
did not quench his thirst for roving and he joined the Walker 
expedition to Nicaragua and with most of the command, was 
made a prisoner. He was tried and convicted as a fillibuster 
and the death sentence pronounced. The day of execution 
was near at hand and his head had been shaved as a part of 
the preparation for death, but young Taylor had no notion of 
remaining to witness the affair, and by dint of strategy he 
managed to escape from prison, and after great hardships he 
reached the States and finally returned home, where he re- 
mained until the breaking out of the war of the rebellion. 
He enlisted in the Tenth Indiana, and passed by well earned 
promotion to the highest rank of his gallant old regiment. He 
knew no fear and was brave to recklessness. When the regi- 
ment was mustered out he returned to this city, but was not 
content with the life of a civilian and applied to Governor 
Morton for service in the field. The Governor commissioned 
him to recruit the One Hundred Fiftieth Indiana, which he 
did in a very short time, and he took it to the field in A ir- 



HISTORY 01? THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



323 



ginia. The war closed, however, before the regiment saw 
any active service, and when it was mustered out he again 
came back to this city. The war spirit was not yet quenched 
and when the Fenian war cloud came up he again offered his 
services and opened a recruiting office in this city. Soon 
after this he moved to St. Louis, where he engaged in the real 
estate business for a while, and from there he went to Omaha 
and engaged in the boot and shoe business with the Shote 
brothers of St. Louis. He gave that up after a time, and since 
than has been trading in the West and South, and finally in 
Texas, where his death took place. He was a brother of 
Colonel W. C. L. Taylor and to Mrs. Colonel George S. Rose 
of this city." 

THE BUG. 

Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

Alnd never brought to mind, 
Should auld acquaintance be forgot 

In the days of Auld Lang Syne? 

We'll n're forget when first we met, 

In the days of Auld Lang Syne, 
How you made us scratch and swear you bet 

In the days of Auld Lang Syne. 

Every soldier will recognize the above bird — "he was a 
bird." When he first made his appearance the boys were in a 
quandary as to its pedigree, the place of its nativity and its 




occupation or habits. One of the officers, who was somewhat 
versed in Latin, upon being shown one of the "varmints," pro- 
nounced it a "Pediculous Humannus," and proceeded to give 
a dissertation on its habits, customs and general usefulness. 
He said "where the soldier had a few of these on his person 
he was not liable to go to sleep on picket. That in camp, 
when there was nothing doing in particular, the pediculous 
would find him something to do." 

After listening to the Lieutenant respectfully, for a time, 
(because he was a commissioned officer) the soldier went to 
his quarters, cogitating on the dissertation of the officer, said, 
"Well, I'll be damned." 

Some of the boys desiring to be choice in their language 
called it a "greyback," but the all around private gave its 
name in good old United States, that it was nothing more or 
less than a "body louse," pure and simple. 

This pediculous was not choice in his associations or the 
company he kept. He was just as happy and contented with 
a major general as he was with an "eighth" corporal's clerk 
or an army teamster. Race, color or nationality did not con- 
cern him. He cared not whether his victim was a Republican 
or Democrat, whether he was a Protestant. Catholic. Hebrew 
or Turk. They were all the same to him and he lavished the 
same amount of affection on one as the other, no partiality 
shown. He selected as his habitation the seams of shirts and 
trousers and took up his abode quietly therein and proceeded 
to increase his kind, which he did with astonishing rapidity. 




SKIRJIISHIXG 



HISTORY OF THE TENTH INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 



325 



If one died or met a fatal accident there were a thousand to 
fill the vacancy. He abhored hot weather, and when on the 
march the boys became hot and sweaty, the bug would at once 
"get busy." This had a tendency to irritate the men, causing 
them to use language not found in the general literature of the 
land. But revenge is sweet, and immediately after arriving 
in camp, they would go, singly and in squads, to the nearest 
tree — off came the shirts and the '"skirmishing" would begin. 
The continued "popping" between the thumb nails indicated 
a heavv skirmish fire all along the line and a wholesale 
slaughter of "pediculous." 

In color the "pediculous" was a ditry grey, similar to the 
rebel uniforms, and it was difficult for the Johnnies to locate 
him when he took up his abode on the grey uniform. It was 
different on a blue uniform. When he first made his appear- 
ance in the regiment it caused a great deal of worry, as to the 
best means of exterminating the nuisance. It was decided, 
however, that it would be impossible for him to live in boiling 
water and the camp kettle was resorted to. Sometimes the 
boys had to suspend this amusement in order to let the com- 
panv cooks put on the beans for dinner. Sometimes the ket- 



tles were washed out, other times simply rinsed. It may be 
that sometimes the "pediculous" lost its life in the boiling 
beans, but no court of inquiry was instituted to ascertain the 
fact. So they were rid of the pest was the main thing and it 
was immaterial whether its life was sacrificed in the boiled 
beans or beef soup. On one occasion we rested a short time 
in a rebel camp, the ground was sandy and one of the boys 
noticed the sand moving similar to a mole boring through the 
ground. Upon investigation they found millions of the ver- 
min. ( >ne picked up was found to have the mark "C. S. A." 
on its back. One of the boys got one off his blouse marked 
"U. S. A." Securing a chip they were placed head to head 
and at once commenced to fight. In a short time "C. S. A." 
began to retreat and in the round up both were killed, one for 
running, the other for making him run. 

It required a great deal of hard work on the part of the 
men to keep rid of the vermin and finally they formulated a 
plan by which they were well rid of them — the constant use 
of boiling water. 

Such is the pedigree of the "pediculous." May his "num- 
bers grow less." 



BuFt-llaywood Co, 



LaFaycttc, Indiana